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Crash of a Dassault Falcon 20CC in Thomson: 2 killed

Date & Time: Oct 5, 2021 at 0544 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N283SA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Lubbock - Thomson
MSN:
83
YOM:
1967
Flight number:
PKW887
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful cargo flight (service PKW887) from Lubbock-Preston Smith Airport, the crew initiated a night descent to Thomson-McDuffie County Airport. On short final, the aircraft impacted trees and crashed in a pasture, less than 2 km short of runway 10 threshold. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact and both pilots were killed. There was no fire.

Crash of a Raytheon 390 Premier I in Thomson: 5 killed

Date & Time: Feb 20, 2013 at 2006 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N777VG
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nashville - Thomson
MSN:
RB-208
YOM:
2007
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
13319
Captain / Total hours on type:
198.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2932
Copilot / Total hours on type:
45
Aircraft flight hours:
635
Circumstances:
Aircraft was destroyed following a collision with a utility pole, trees, and terrain following a go-around at Thomson-McDuffie Regional Airport (HQU), Thomson, Georgia. The airline transport-rated pilot and copilot were seriously injured, and five passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to the Pavilion Group LLC and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated at John C. Tune Airport (JWN), Nashville, Tennessee, about 1828 central standard time (1928 eastern standard time). The purpose of the flight was to transport staff members of a vascular surgery practice from Nashville to Thomson, where the airplane was based. According to initial air traffic control information, the pilot checked in with Augusta approach control and reported HQU in sight. About 2003, the pilot cancelled visual flight rules flight-following services and continued toward HQU. The last recorded radar return was observed about 2005, when the airplane was at an indicated altitude of 700 feet above mean sea level and 1/2 mile from the airport. There were no distress calls received from the crew prior to the accident. Witnesses reported that the airplane appeared to be in position to land when the pilot discontinued the approach and commenced a go-around. The witnesses observed the airplane continue down the runway at a low altitude. The airplane struck a poured-concrete utility pole and braided wires about 59 feet above ground level. The pole was located about 1/4 mile east the departure end of runway 10. The utility pole was not lighted. During the initial impact with the utility pole, the outboard section of the left wing was severed. The airplane continued another 1/4 mile east before colliding with trees and terrain. A postcrash fire ensued and consumed a majority of the airframe. The engines separated from the fuselage during the impact sequence. On-scene examination of the wreckage revealed that all primary airframe structural components were accounted for at the accident site. The landing gear were found in the down (extended) position, and the flap handle was found in the 10-degree (go-around) position. An initial inspection of the airport revealed that the pilot-controlled runway lights were operational. An examination of conditions recorded on an airport security camera showed that the runway lights were on the low intensity setting at the time of the accident. The airport did not have a control tower. An inspection of the runway surface did not reveal any unusual tire marks or debris. Weather conditions at HQU near the time of the accident included calm wind and clear skies.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to follow airplane flight manual procedures for an antiskid failure in flight and his failure to immediately retract the lift dump after he elected to attempt a go-around on the runway. Contributing to the accident were the pilot's lack of systems knowledge and his fatigue due to acute sleep loss and his ineffective use of time between flights to obtain sleep.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA26T Merlin IIA in Thompson: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jun 1, 1994 at 0001 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FFYC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Coral Harbour – Churchill – Thompson
MSN:
T26-36
YOM:
1969
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
20000
Captain / Total hours on type:
3160.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3700
Copilot / Total hours on type:
375
Aircraft flight hours:
12633
Circumstances:
The twin-engine turboprop aircraft had just completed a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) flight from Coral Harbour, Northwest Territories (NWT), to Churchill, Manitoba. At 2257 central daylight saving time (CDT), the aircraft departed Churchill for a night, instrument flight rules (IFR) flight to return to the aircraft's base of operations at Thompson, Manitoba. The en route portion of the return leg was conducted at an altitude of 18,000 feet above sea level (asl). Approximately one hour after take-off, the aircraft commenced an approach to the Thompson Airport. The crew remained in radio contact with air traffic control (ATC) personnel until approximately 2359 CDT. Just after midnight (0001 CDT), the Hotel non-directional beacon (NDB), which is located 3.4 miles northeast of the Thompson Airport, stopped transmitting. Ninety minutes later, the search and rescue satellite system (SARSAT) picked up an emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signal to the northeast of the airport. Thompson Airport staff, who had been dispatched to the site of the failed navigation beacon, found the wreckage of the aircraft in and around the NDB transmitter compound. Emergency responses were initiated by various airport and local authorities.
Probable cause:
The flight crew lost altitude awareness during the localizer back course approach and allowed the aircraft to descend below a mandatory level-off altitude. Contributing factors to this occurrence were the crew's deviation from a published approach procedure, ineffective in-flight monitoring of the approach, rapidly developing localized fog conditions, and, probably, pilot fatigue.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2-60 Marquise in McLeod: 5 killed

Date & Time: Sep 2, 1981 at 1653 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N233MA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Dallas - Thomson
MSN:
251
YOM:
1973
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
2526
Captain / Total hours on type:
155.00
Circumstances:
While cruising at an altitude of 21,000 feet, the pilot was cleared to climb to 23,000 feet when the airplane's speed dropped about 53 knots. The airplane entered a rapid descent and was observed spinning until it crashed in a field. All five occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Stall and rapid descent due to improper in-flight decisions. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Airframe ice,
- The pilot failed to maintain flying speed,
- Incorrect weather briefing,
- Icing conditions including sleet, freezing rain.
Final Report: