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Crash of a Piper PA-46-310P Malibu in Prescott

Date & Time: May 29, 2018 at 2115 LT
Registration:
N148ME
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Santa Ana – Prescott
MSN:
46-8608009
YOM:
1986
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3100
Captain / Total hours on type:
3.00
Circumstances:
According to the pilot, about 15 minutes before reaching the destination airport during descent, the engine lost power. The pilot switched fuel tanks, and the engine power was momentarily restored, but the engine stopped producing power even though he thought it "was still running all the way to impact." The pilot conducted a forced landed on a highway at night, and the right wing struck an object and separated from the airplane. The airplane came to rest inverted. According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector (ASI) that performed the postaccident airplane examination, the fuel lines to the fuel manifold were dry, and the fuel manifold valves were dry. He reported that the fuel strainer, the diaphragm, and the fuel filter in the duel manifold were unremarkable. Fuel was found in the gascolator. The FAA ASI reported that, during his interview with the pilot, "the pilot changed his story from fuel exhaustion, to fuel contamination." The inspector reported that there were no signs of fuel contamination during the examination of the fuel system. According to the fixed-base operator (FBO) at the departure airport, the pilot requested 20 gallons of fuel. He then canceled his fuel request and walked out of the FBO.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper fuel planning, which resulted in fuel exhaustion and the subsequent total loss of engine power.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-42 Cheyenne in Prescott: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 18, 2006 at 1347 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N121CS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Prescott - Prescott
MSN:
42-8001032
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
4363
Aircraft flight hours:
5317
Circumstances:
The pilot of a MiG 21 and the pilot of a Piper PA-42 Cheyenne III met just prior to the flight to discuss the flight in which the Cheyenne pilot would be taking aerial photos of the MiG. The two pilots established a minimum altitude of 2,500 to 3,000 feet agl and 200 knots as their minimum airspeed. The pilots did not establish a minimum separation distance, as it was not intended to be a formation flight. The MiG pilot reported that after takeoff the aircraft experienced a problem with the landing gear retraction. The pilot recycled the landing gear and a successful gear retraction was indicated. The MiG pilot notified the Cheyenne pilot of the situation and the Cheyenne pilot indicated that they would join up with the MiG, look it over and check-out the landing gear, and let the MiG pilot know what they saw. The MiG pilot flew at 9,000 feet msl in a 30-degree right hand turn at 200 knots (about 90 percent power set) with approach flaps selected (approximately 25 degrees) until the Cheyenne met up with the MiG. The MiG pilot reported that he observed the Cheyenne meet up with him at his 5 o'clock position about 300-400 feet behind him and about the same altitude. In this position, the Cheyenne was in the direct path of the high velocity jet core exhaust from the MiG. The MiG pilot looked forward and when he looked back, he could not see the Cheyenne. The Cheyenne pilot then contacted the MiG pilot and made a comment about the right landing gear or gear door, but the statement was not completed. The MiG pilot did not hear back from the Cheyenne pilot. The MiG pilot then observed smoke rising from the desert terrain and notified air traffic control. The airport manager that was monitoring the conversation between the two aircraft stated that he heard the Cheyenne pilot indicate that he would "drop down and go underneath and let you know how it looks." Wreckage documentation noted that the main wreckage was located in an inverted position on flat terrain. The T-tail, which consisted of the upper half of the vertical stabilizer, horizontal stabilizer, and elevator had separated in flight and was located about 1/2 mile south of the main wreckage. Inspection of the upper portion of the aft vertical spar displayed a right bend and twist at the point of separation. No evidence of pre-existing cracks, corrosion or wear was noted to the material. Inspection of the MiG aircraft found no evidence of contact between the two aircraft.
Probable cause:
The failure of the pilot following a jet aircraft to maintain adequate separation from the high velocity jet core exhaust. The separation of the T-tail upper section vertical stabilizer of the following aircraft due to contact with the high velocity jet core exhaust was a factor.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed P2V-7 Neptune near San Bernardino: 2 killed

Date & Time: Oct 3, 2003 at 1116 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N299MA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Prescott – San Bernardino
MSN:
726-7211
YOM:
1958
Flight number:
Tanker 99
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
7803
Captain / Total hours on type:
1853.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
7363
Copilot / Total hours on type:
853
Circumstances:
The fire tanker airplane was on a cross-country positioning flight and collided with mountainous terrain while maneuvering in a canyon near the destination airport. Witnesses who held pilot certificates were on a mountain top at 7,900 feet and saw a cloud layer as far to the south as they could see. They used visual cues to estimate that the cloud tops were around 5,000 feet mean sea level (msl). They noted that the clouds did not extend all the way up into the mountain canyons; the clouds broke up near the head of some canyons. When they first saw the airplane, they assumed that it came from above the clouds. It was proceeding north up a canyon near the edge of clouds, which were breaking up. They were definitely looking down at the airplane the whole time. They saw the airplane make a 180-degree turn that was steeper than a standard rate turn. The wings leveled and the airplane went through one cloud, reappeared briefly, and then entered the cloud layer. It appeared to be descending when they last saw it. About 2 minutes later, they saw the top of the cloud layer bulge and turn a darker color. The bulge began to subside and they observed several smaller bulges appear. They notified local authorities that they thought a plane was down. Searchers discovered the wreckage at that location and reported that the wreckage and surrounding vegetation were on fire. The initial responders reported that the area was cloudy and the visibility was low. Examination of the ground scars and wreckage debris path disclosed that the airplane collided with the canyon walls in controlled flight on a westerly heading of 260 degrees at an elevation of 3,400 feet msl. The operator had an Automated Flight Following (AFF) system installed on the airplane. It recorded the airplane's location every 2 minutes using a GPS. The data indicated that the airplane departed Prescott and flew direct to the Twentynine Palms VORTAC (very high frequency omnidirectional radio range, tactical air navigation). The flight changed course slightly to 260 degrees, which took it to the northeast corner of the wilderness area where the accident occurred. At 1102:57, the data indicated that the airplane was at 11,135 feet msl at 204 knots. The airplane then made three left descending 360-degree turns. The third turn began at 6,010 feet msl. At 1116:57, the last recorded data point indicated that the airplane was at an altitude of 3,809 feet heading 256 degrees at a speed of 128 knots.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate in-flight planning/decision and continued flight into instrument meteorological conditions that resulted in controlled flight into mountainous terrain.
Final Report:

Crash of a Helio H-550A Stallion in Salome

Date & Time: Mar 1, 1992 at 1500 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N550HZ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Prescott - Prescott
MSN:
007
YOM:
1972
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1725
Captain / Total hours on type:
72.00
Circumstances:
The certificated airline transport pilot and a passenger were conducting a low level flight over mountainous terrain. The surface wind conditions were reported to be from the south at or above 20 knots. The pilot reported that he approached the mountain peak in a southerly direction and climbed the airplane to an altitude of 150 feet above the ground to clear the mountain. The airplane encountered downdraft conditions on the lee side of the mountain. The pilot failed to immediately correct for this condition and the airplane collided with the upsloping mountainous terrain when the pilot was executing a 180° turn.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate in-flight planning, improper altitude, and delaying the required remedial action to prevent the collision with the mountain. Contributing to the accident was the unfavorable wind and downdraft conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft C-45g eXPEDITOR in Prescott: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 29, 1971 at 1450 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N74Q
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Las Vegas – Houston
MSN:
AF-290
YOM:
1953
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
2472
Captain / Total hours on type:
189.00
Circumstances:
En route from Las Vegas to Houston, the left engine failed. The pilot was able to feather the propeller but unable to maintain a safe altitude. He informed ATC about his situation and was cleared to divert to the nearest airport for an emergency landing. While trying to land at a ranch airstrip, the airplane hit a wood pile and crashed in flamers. The pilot and a passenger were seriously injured while four other occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Failure of the left engine in flight due to cylinder assembly failure. The following factors were reported:
- Material failure,
- Improper in-flight decisions or planning,
- Improper emergency procedures,
- Intentional wheels-up landing,
- Left engine lost power due to cracked n°9 cylinder.
Final Report:

Crash of a Consolidated P4Y-2 Privateer in Prescott

Date & Time: Jun 20, 1959
Registration:
N6884C
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
MSN:
66284
YOM:
1944
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crashed in unknown circumstances. Crew fate unknown.

Crash of a Lockheed C-121G Super Constellation in Prescott: 5 killed

Date & Time: Feb 28, 1959
Operator:
Registration:
54-4069
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Litchfield Park - Prescott - Litchfield Park
MSN:
4149
YOM:
1954
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The crew left Litchfield Park NAS near Phoenix to conduct a local training mission at Prescott Airport. After completing several touch and go manoeuvres, the crew was flying at an altitude of about 300 feet east of the airfield when control was lost. The aircraft entered a dive and crashed in flames in a near vertical attitude in a wooded area located along Highway 89. The aircraft burst into flames and all five crew members were killed. It was reported that one of the propeller was feathered when control was lost.
Crew:
Cdr Lukas Victor Dachs, pilot,
Lt Theodore L. Rivenburg Jr.,
Lt Edward Francis Souza,
Calvin Coolodge Coon, flight engineer,
James Stephan Miller, engineer.

Crash of a Lockheed 5 Vega near Prescott: 2 killed

Date & Time: Nov 3, 1928 at 1945 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
NX4769
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Los Angeles – New York
MSN:
7
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
From the 24th to the 25th of last October, the aircraft's owner Harry J. Tucker and his pilot Charles B.D. Collyer completed a nonstop flight from New York to Los Angeles in 24 hours and 51 minutes, establishing a new record. In the afternoon of the 3rd of November, they decided to return to the Big Apple on a new nonstop flight. While overflying Arizona by night, crew encountered poor weather conditions (low visibility due to fog and rain). Aircraft christened 'Yankee Doodle' hit a canyon wall some 20 miles north of Prescott and was destroyed by impact forces and postcrash fire. Both occupants were killed.