Crash of a Swearingen SA226T Merlin IIIB in Winslow: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 23, 2021 at 1519 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N59EZ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
T-394
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Scottsdale Airport with two pilots on board. En route, in unclear circumstances, the aircraft went out of control and crashed in an isolated area located in the region of Winslow, bursting into flames. Both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Swearingen SA226T Merlin IIIB in Teterboro

Date & Time: May 31, 2005 at 1130 LT
Registration:
N22DW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nantucket – Teterboro
MSN:
T-317
YOM:
1979
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2676
Captain / Total hours on type:
1400.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4698
Circumstances:
During takeoff from the departure airport, as the pilot advanced the throttles, the aircraft made a "sudden turn to the right." The pilot successfully aborted the takeoff, performed an engine run-up, and then took off without incident. The pilot experienced no anomalies during the second takeoff or the flight to the destination airport. As he reduced the power while in the traffic pattern, at the destination airport, the left engine accelerated to 60 percent power. The pilot reported to the tower that he had "one engine surging and another engine that seems like I lost control or speed." The pilot advanced and retarded the throttles and the engines responded appropriately, so he continued the approach. As the pilot flared the airplane for landing, the left engine surged to 65 percent power with the throttle lever in the "idle" position. The airplane immediately turned to the right; the right wing dropped and impacted the ground. Disassembly of the engines revealed no anomalies to account for surging, or for an uncommanded increase in power or lack of throttle response. Functional testing of the fuel control units and fuel pumps revealed the flight idle fuel flow rate was 237 and 312 pounds per hour (pph), for the left and right engines, respectively. These figures were higher than the new production specification of 214 pph. According to the manufacturer, flight idle fuel flow impacts thrust produced when the power levers are set to the flight idle position and differences in fuel flow can result in an asymmetrical thrust condition.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper decision to depart with a known deficiency, which resulted in a loss of control during landing at the destination airport. A factor was the fuel control units' improper flight idle fuel flow rate.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226T Merlin III in Byers: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 19, 1997 at 2017 LT
Registration:
N950TT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Front Range - Aspen
MSN:
T-225
YOM:
1973
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3316
Captain / Total hours on type:
479.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6599
Circumstances:
The pilot departed Front Range Airport (elevation 5512 feet) at approximately 2008, climbed to 7,000 feet msl, accelerated to 270 knots, and requested his IFR clearance. Weather at the time of N950TT's departure was 500 feet overcast; witnesses reported the tops of the thin cloud condition were 8,500 feet msl and it was very dark on top (no stars or moon). The pilot made several changes in airspeed and climb rate until radar indicated that he had entered an 8,500 fpm decent. The pilot reported to ATC that he had 'stalled' the airplane. Radar indicated that he then climbed at 7,500 fpm until his estimated airspeed was 10 knots, and then subsequently descended again at 8,400 fpm until he impacted the frozen ground. The pilot had flown 4 times for 7 hours in the previous 40 days. Five airline pilots, each of who had 3,000 to 5,000 hours in Swearingens, stated individually that even though the airplane is single pilot certified, they believed that 'its a two pilot airplane--because the work load is too high.'
Probable cause:
The pilot inadvertently stalling the airplane and his subsequent spatial disorientation which prevented him from maintaining airplane control. Factors were excessive workload on the pilot and the dark night light conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226T Merlin III in Ushuaia

Date & Time: Apr 4, 1996 at 1350 LT
Operator:
Registration:
LV-WLW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Río Grande – Ushuaia
MSN:
T-230
YOM:
1973
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On final approach to Ushuaia Airport, following an uneventful cargo flight from Río Grande, the twin engine aircraft collided with a flock of birds. The windshield was broken and the left engine lost power. The crew was able to continue the approach and landing. After touchdown, the aircraft went out of control and collided with a snow wall. Both pilots escaped with minor injuries and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Bird strike on final approach.

Crash of a Swearingen SA226T Merlin III in Chino

Date & Time: Sep 18, 1995 at 0624 LT
Registration:
N693PG
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Apple Valley - Chino
MSN:
T-207
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3282
Captain / Total hours on type:
346.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5218
Circumstances:
During arrival at dawn, the pilot contacted Approach Control about 22 miles from the airport at 8,500 feet and requested an ILS runway 26 approach. The ATIS was reporting 1/8 mile visibility with fog; the minimum published visibility for the ILS landing was 3/4 mile. The controller vectored the aircraft so that it intercepted the ILS localizer at the outer marker at an intercept angle that was 5 degrees greater than the maximum allowable intercept of 30 degrees. The intercept point should have been at least 3 miles further away from the airport. The aircraft was 650 feet above the ILS glideslope at the outer marker (which was outside the ILS glideslope parameter). Instead of making a missed approach, the pilot elected to continue the ILS. As he attempted to intercept the glideslope from above, the airplane entered a high rate of descent and passed through the glideslope. The pilot was arresting the descent, when the airplane collided with level terrain about 1,000 feet short of the runway. After the accident, at 0646 edt, the visibility was 1/16 mile with fog.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper IFR procedure by not initiating a missed approach at the outer marker, by attempting to intercept the glideslope from above after passing the outer marker, and by allowing the airplane to continue descending after reaching the decision height. Factors relating to the accident were: the adverse weather condition, and the approach controller's improper technique in vectoring the airplane onto the ILS localizer.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA227TT Merlin IIIC in Bristol: 4 killed

Date & Time: Apr 1, 1993 at 2128 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N500AK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Knoxville - Bristol
MSN:
TT-527
YOM:
1983
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
19105
Captain / Total hours on type:
235.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2294
Circumstances:
N500AK encountered icing in flight before start of ILS approach. Radar data showed that before reaching outer marker, it slowed in a manner that was consistent with a power reduction (or partial loss of power), then it entered a steep descent and crashed. Examination revealed engines were not operating at impact and that propellers had been feathered. No preimpact part failure or malfunction of engines, propellers or anti-ice system was found. There was evidence that engine inlet anti-ice annunciator lights and stability augmentation system (SAS) fault warning light were illuminated during impact. The engine manufacturer reported that flameouts had occurred in other aircraft, during or following operation in icing conditions, sometimes after descent into warmer air. Flight manual noted that if icing was encountered with anti-ice system off, select continuous ignition and then select engine and propeller heat (1 engine at a time, ensuring first engine was operating satisfactorily before selecting second engine) and engage sas heat. All four occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Failure of the pilot to follow procedures concerning use of the engine inlet anti-ice system and/or continuous ignition while operating in icing conditions, which resulted in probable ice ingestion and loss of engine power; and the pilot's failure to maintain sufficient airspeed while coping with the engine problem, which resulted in a stall. Factors related to the accident were: darkness, icing conditions, and engine inlet (nacelle) ice.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226T Merlin III in Nairobi

Date & Time: Oct 1, 1992
Registration:
5Y-TNT
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
T-211
YOM:
1971
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll, the nose gear collapsed. The aircraft slid for few dozen metres, overran, collided with a fence and came to rest in a ditch, bursting into flames. Both pilots were injured.
Probable cause:
Failure of the nose gear during takeoff for unknown reasons.

Crash of a Swearingen SA226T Merlin III in Helsinki: 7 killed

Date & Time: Feb 24, 1989 at 2350 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N26RT
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Southend - Helsinki
MSN:
T-216
YOM:
1971
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Captain / Total flying hours:
12991
Aircraft flight hours:
4401
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was completing a night charter flight from Southend to Helsinki, carrying seven passengers and one pilot. On final approach to Helsinki-Vantaa Airport runway 22, the pilot elected to reduce the speed when the aircraft lost altitude, descended below the MDA, struck the ground and came to rest inverted in a snow covered field located about one km short of runway threshold. A passenger was seriously injured while seven other occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
It is believed that the pilot probably encountered difficulties in controlling the altitude and an excessive speed during the final approach procedure. As a result, he retarded engine power by pulling both speed levers backwards. Investigations revealed that the flight idle gate allowing the speed levers to be stopped before being positioned at idle was worn, which allowed the pilot to position both levers to idle position while still on approach. This caused the aircraft to lose speed and altitude and to descend below the minimum descent altitude (MDA) until it struck the ground.
The following contributing factors were reported:
- The pilot did not have sufficient experience on this type of aircraft,
- The pilot's training on such operation was insufficient,
- The accident occurred in demanding instrument flight conditions.
Final Report: