Crash of a Piper PA-46-310P Malibu in Hartford

Date & Time: Jul 12, 1996 at 1115 LT
Registration:
N234DM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Hartford – Block Island
MSN:
46-8408043
YOM:
1984
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4918
Captain / Total hours on type:
488.00
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that he performed a rolling takeoff from the 2315 ft runway. He said that as soon as the airplane broke ground on the takeoff roll, he experienced a loss of engine power. The pilot said that he retracted the gear to help clear a 42 ft dike at the departure end of the runway. Also, he reported that after clearing the dike, he turned gradually to the left, and the left wing stalled. Two witnesses reported hearing loud, steady sounds from the airplane's engine and propeller. They said they saw the airplane in a high nose-up attitude, and watched the airplane descend behind the dike. The engine could be heard until the airplane contacted the river. During an operational check after the accident, the engine performed at recommended levels. According to performance data provided by the FAA, at the given takeoff weight, with a zero degree flap setting, the airplane required 2850 feet of runway to clear a 50 ft obstacle. The charts were based on full power before brake release.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate preflight planning/preparation, and his failure to attain the proper liftoff airspeed, which resulted in a stall and collision with the terrain (river).
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226AC Metro II in Hartford: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 17, 1993 at 0225 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N220KC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Farmingdale - Hartford
MSN:
AC-231
YOM:
1977
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
4200
Captain / Total hours on type:
600.00
Aircraft flight hours:
16710
Circumstances:
On an approach to land at the destination, the second-in-command (sic) was flying the airplane. The plane touched down with the landing gear retracted, and the propeller blades contacted the runway. The sic initiated a go-around (aborted landing). Witnesses saw the airplane in a steep left bank just before impact in a river next to the airport. Propeller strikes on the runway extended 380 feet, indicating a touchdown speed of 96 knots. The last propeller strikes on the right side indicated a speed of 86 knots. The last strikes on the left side indicated a slowing propeller. Published VMC for the airplane was 94 knots. The CVR tape revealed the crew completed a descent arrival check, performed an incomplete approach briefing, and did not perform a before landing check. The CVR revealed no sound of a gear warning horn. Company personnel stated that the circuit breaker for the warning horn had been found pulled at the completion of previous flights by other crew; this was to prevent a warning horn from sounding during a high rate of descent. Both pilots were killed.
Probable cause:
Failure of the copilot (second-in-command) to follow the checklist, assure the gear was extended for landing and attain or maintain adequate airspeed (VMC); and failure of the pilot-in-command (pic) to properly supervise the flight and take sufficient remedial action.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Grand Commander 690 in Goldsboro

Date & Time: Jan 15, 1980 at 0118 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N182
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Hartford - Charlotte
MSN:
690-11048
YOM:
1972
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
9708
Captain / Total hours on type:
948.00
Circumstances:
While in normal cruise on a cargo flight from Hartford to Charlotte by night, the pilot informed ATC about technical problems. The aircraft lost 2,000 feet then entered an uncontrolled descent and eventually crashed in a field. The pilot was seriously injured.
Probable cause:
Uncontrolled descent and subsequent crash due to engine structure issues. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Engine tearaway,
- Engine structure: mount and vibration isolators,
- Material failure,
- Separation in flight,
- Pilot reported pitchup with autopilot off,
- Recovered with light g load,
- Right engine inbound mount pulled out.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-61 Aerostar (Ted Smith 601P) in Hartford: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 28, 1978 at 0903 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N8999A
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hartford - Newburgh
MSN:
61-0501-206
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
3234
Captain / Total hours on type:
170.00
Circumstances:
After takeoff from Hartford-Brainard Airport, while climbing, the left engine failed while the right engine lost power. The pilot attempted an emergency landing when control was lost. The airplane crashed few miles from the airfield and was destroyed. All three occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Uncontrolled collision with ground following technical issues with both engines. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Engine structure: piston, piston rings, overheated,
- Exhaust system: external supercharger, erratic,
- Undetermined loss of aircraft control,
- Partial loss of power on one engine,
- Complete engine failure on one engine,
- Forced landing off airport on land,
- left engine over temperature piston,
- Right erratic turbo gate.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft C-45H Expeditor in Hartford

Date & Time: Jun 3, 1968 at 1510 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N4000Y
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
AF-820
YOM:
1954
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3631
Captain / Total hours on type:
151.00
Circumstances:
While on a positioning flight to Hartford-Brainard Airport, the pilot encountered strong crosswinds upon arrival. After touchdown, control was lost. The airplane lost its undercarriage and came to rest by the runway shoulder. The pilot was unhurt while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
The pilot exercised poor judgment and landed with unfavorable wind conditions. Upon landing, there was a right cross wind (80°) at 25 knots, gusting to 35 knots.
Final Report: