Crash of a Piper PA-60 Aerostar (Ted Smith 600) in Wichita

Date & Time: Jul 1, 2021 at 1910 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N10HK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Sioux Falls – Wichita
MSN:
60-0715-8061222
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On final approach to Wichita-Colonel James Jabara Airport, the pilot reported technical problems and elected to make an emergency landing. The aircraft crash landed in a field located about 3,5 km short of runway 18. The pilot escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-60 Marquise in Sioux Falls: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 7, 2020 at 0415 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N44MX
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Everett – Huron
MSN:
1526
YOM:
1981
Flight number:
MDS44
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The pilot departed Everett-Payne Field in the evening of June 6 on a cargo service to Huron, SD. En route, he was informed about the presence of thunderstorms in the Huron area and decided to divert to Sioux Falls Airport where he landed at 0140LT. Awaiting weather improvement, he left Sioux Falls around 0415LT to resume his flight to Huron. Upon takeoff, the twin engine aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances and was destroyed. The pilot was killed.

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Sioux Falls: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 9, 2011 at 1424 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N421SY
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sioux Falls - Rapid City
MSN:
421C-0051
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
3848
Captain / Total hours on type:
357.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4882
Circumstances:
Shortly after the airplane lifted off, the tower controller informed the pilot that a plume of smoke was visible behind the airplane. No communications were received from the pilot after he acknowledged the takeoff clearance. Witnesses reported that white smoke appeared to be trailing from the area of the left engine during takeoff. The witnesses subsequently observed flames at the inboard side of the left engine. The airplane began a left turn. As the airplane continued the turn, the flames and trail of white smoke were no longer visible. When the airplane reached a southerly heading, the nose dropped abruptly, and the airplane descended to the ground. Witnesses stated that they heard an increase in engine sound before impact. A postimpact fire ensued. The accident site was located about 3/4 mile from the airport. A postaccident examination determined that the left engine fuel selector and fuel valve were in the OFF position, consistent with the pilot shutting down that engine after takeoff. However, the left engine propeller was not feathered. Extensive damage to the right engine propeller assembly was consistent with that engine producing power at the time of impact. The landing gear and wing flaps were extended at the time of impact. Teardown examinations of both engines did not reveal any anomalies consistent with a loss of engine power. The left engine oil cap was observed to be unsecured at the accident site; however, postaccident comparison of the left and right engine oil caps revealed disproportionate distortion of the left oil cap, likely due to the postimpact fire. As a result, no determination was made regarding the security of left engine oil cap before the accident. Emergency procedures outlined in the pilot’s operating handbook (POH) noted that when securing an engine, the propeller should be feathered. Performance data provided in the POH for single-engine operations were predicated on the propeller of the inoperative engine being feathered, and the wing flaps and landing gear retracted. Thus, the pilot did not follow the emergency procedures outlined in the POH for single-engine operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed after shutting down one engine, which resulted in an inadvertent aerodynamic stall and impact with terrain. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s failure to follow the guidance contained in the pilot’s operating handbook, which advised feathering the propeller of the secured engine and retracting the flaps and landing gear.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage in Benton Harbor: 3 killed

Date & Time: Aug 4, 2002 at 1335 LT
Registration:
N316PM
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sioux Falls – Benton Harbor
MSN:
46-36317
YOM:
2001
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
2408
Captain / Total hours on type:
165.00
Aircraft flight hours:
187
Circumstances:
The single-engine airplane experienced a loss of engine power during cruise flight at flight level 190 (19,000 feet) and impacted the terrain while performing a forced landing to a nearby airport. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident with clear skies and unrestricted visibilities. The pilot reported the loss of engine power about 16 minutes prior to the accident and requested clearance to the nearest airport. Air traffic control (ATC) issued vectors to the Southwest Michigan Regional Airport (BEH). About 10 minutes prior to the accident, the airplane was positioned approximately 1.3 nm north of BEH at 13,500 feet. The pilot elected to follow ATC vectors verses circling down over BEH. ATC provided vectors for runway 27 at BEH. Witnesses to the accident reported seeing the airplane "spiraling down and crashing into the ground." The wreckage was located on the extended runway 27 centerline, about 1.12 nm from the runway threshold. The distribution of the wreckage was consistent with a stall/spin accident. Approximately four minutes before the accident, the airplane was on a 9.5 nm final approach at 6,700 feet. Between 9.5 and 5.3 nm the airspeed fluctuated between 119 and 155 knots, and the descent rate varied between 1,550 and 2,600 feet/min. Between 5.3 nm and the last radar return at 1.5 nm the airspeed dropped from 155 to 78 knots. According to the Pilot Operating Handbook (POH) the accident airplane should be flown at best glide speed (92 knots) after a loss of engine power. An average engine-out descent rate of 700 feet/min is achieved when best glide speed is maintained during engine-out descents. An engine teardown inspection revealed that the crankshaft was fractured at the number five crankpin journal. Visual examination of the crankshaft (p/n 13F27738, s/n V537920968) showed a fatigue-type fracture through the cheek, aft of the number five crankpin journal. The exact cause of the crankshaft failure could not be determined, due to mechanical damage at the fatigue initiation point. The fracture features for the accident crankshaft was consistent with 14 previous failures of the same part number. The engine manufacturer determined the failures were most likely due to the overheating of the steel during the forging process.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed above stall speed resulting in a stall/spin. Additional causes were the pilot not maintaining best glide airspeed and optimal glidepath following the loss of engine power. A factor to the accident was the engine failure due to the fatigue failure of the crankshaft.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 65-B80 Queen Air in Great Bend: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 12, 1995 at 0843 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N7057J
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sioux Falls - Fargo
MSN:
LD-291
YOM:
1966
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
6100
Captain / Total hours on type:
250.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6887
Circumstances:
The airplane was cruising at 6,000 feet where it encountered icing conditions. When cleared to 3,600 feet, the pilot reported that one engine lost all power and the other one was running rough. The airplane continued the descent. After about ten minutes the airplane departed controlled flight, reversing heading and impacting near vertically in the terrain. A post accident examination of the left engine (which was feathered) found an induction duct which had deteriorated and begun to come apart. Foreign object material in the compressor assembly similar in appearance to material from the duct was found. The number five piston had a hole burned through it.
Probable cause:
The pilot/mechanic's inadequate maintenance (inspection) of aircraft and the pilot's failure to maintain airspeed (VMC). Factors were icing conditions, deteriorated induction air ducting, and failure of a piston assembly.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 207 Skywagon near Hardwick: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 4, 1988 at 1820 LT
Registration:
N207CA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sioux Falls - Crystal
MSN:
207-0097
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
8000
Captain / Total hours on type:
260.00
Aircraft flight hours:
12000
Circumstances:
Witnesses observed the aircraft for approximately 8 minutes in erratic diving, climbing, and steep-turning maneuvers which culminated in a 12° descent to the ground. The sound of the engine was heard throughout the sequence and other evidence indicated engine power at impact. The aircraft struck trees, a farm building, farm equipment, and a vehicle, then burst into flames. The wreckage was strewn along a 320 feet path. No evidence of flight control malfunction was found. The pilot claimed an upset stomach before the flight. The pilot's speech was slurred in radio transmissions. The pilot did not respond to the last radio call from Sioux Falls tower. No emergency or distress calls were received from the pilot. The postmortem examination of the pilot did not identify specific impairment but was limited due to the severity of the impact and fire damage.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: maneuvering
Findings
1. (c) maneuver - improper - pilot in command
2. (c) aircraft control - not maintained - pilot in command
3. (f) physical impairment - pilot in command
4. Object - tree(s)
5. Object - building(nonresidential)
6. Object - vehicle
Final Report: