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Crash of a Piper PA-60-602P Aerostar (Ted Smith 600) in Greenville: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jul 30, 2018 at 1044 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-GRRS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Pembroke – Charlottetown
MSN:
60-8265-026
YOM:
1982
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
590
Captain / Total hours on type:
136.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4856
Circumstances:
The private pilot of the multiengine airplane was in cruise flight at 23,000 ft mean sea level (msl) in day visual meteorological conditions when he reported to air traffic control that the airplane was losing altitude due to a loss of engine power. The controller provided vectors to a nearby airport; about 7 minutes later, the pilot reported the airport in sight and stated that he would enter a downwind leg for runway 14. By this time, the airplane had descended to about 3,200 ft above ground level. Radar data indicated that the airplane proceeded toward the runway but that it was about 400 ft above ground level on short final. The airplane flew directly over the airport at a low altitude before entering a left turn to a close downwind for runway 21. Witnesses stated that the airplane's propellers were turning, but they could not estimate engine power. When the airplane reached the approach end of runway 21, it entered a steep left turn and was flying slowly before the left wing suddenly "stalled" and the airplane pitched nose-down toward the ground. Postaccident examination of the airplane and engines revealed no mechanical deficiencies that would have precluded normal operation at the time of impact. Examination of both propeller systems indicated power symmetry at the time of impact, with damage to both assemblies consistent with low or idle engine power. The onboard engine monitor recorded battery voltage, engine exhaust gas temperature, and cylinder head temperature for both engines. A review of the recorded data revealed that about 14 minutes before the accident, there was a jump followed by a decrease in exhaust gas temperature (EGT) and cylinder head temperature (CHT) for both engines. The temperatures decreased for about 9 minutes, during which time the right engine EGT data spiked twice. Both engines' EGT and CHT values then returned to normal, consistent with both engines producing power, for the remaining 5 minutes of data. It is possible that a fuel interruption may have caused the momentary increase in both engines' EGT and CHT values and prompted the pilot to report the engine power loss; however, the engine monitor did not record fuel pressure or fuel flow, and examination of the airplane's fuel system and engines did not reveal any mechanical anomalies. Therefore, the reason for the reported loss of engine power could not be determined. It is likely that the pilot's initial approach for landing was too high, and he attempted to circle over the airport to lose altitude. While doing so, he exceeded the airplane's critical angle of attack while in a left turn and the airplane entered an aerodynamic stall at an altitude too low for recovery.
Probable cause:
The pilot's exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack while maneuvering to land, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208B Super Cargomaster in Greenville

Date & Time: Sep 23, 2000 at 1950 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N590TA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Bangor - Greenville
MSN:
208B-0590
YOM:
1997
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5350
Captain / Total hours on type:
2000.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2671
Circumstances:
According to the pilot, he was conducting a GPS approach during occasional low ceilings, reduced visibility and rain. At the minimum descent altitude, the ground was 'occasionally' visible through fog and rain. Near the missed approach point, the runway lights were visible, so he continued the descent. He lost visual contact with the runway, and began a missed approach, but collided with trees. The accident site was 2 miles prior to the runway, on rising terrain, 200 feet below the runway elevation. The missed approach point was over the approach end of the runway.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper in-flight decision to continue his descent without visual contact with the runway, and his inattention to his altitude, in relation to the airport elevation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 402B in Greenville: 6 killed

Date & Time: May 11, 1973 at 1800 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N2985Q
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Concord - Greenville
MSN:
402B-0242
YOM:
1972
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
4471
Captain / Total hours on type:
290.00
Circumstances:
The crew started the descent to Greenville Airport in poor weather conditions with fog and limited visibility. On final approach, the pilot-in-command passed below the glide and below the MDA fixed at 2,200 feet, probably to establish a visual contact with the ground. While descending to an altitude of 1,400 feet, the twin engine airplane struck trees and crashed in a wooded area located few miles short of runway. The aircraft was destroyed and all six occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Improper IFR operation on part of the crew. The following factors were reported:
- High obstructions,
- Low ceiling, fog,
- Descended below MDA at 2,200 feet,
- Hit trees at 1,400 feet,
- Witnesses reported hillside was in fog about halfway up.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose in Greenville: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 30, 1971 at 1600 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N101LH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Greenville - Greenville
MSN:
1136
YOM:
1942
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1759
Captain / Total hours on type:
6.00
Circumstances:
45 minutes after takeoff from Greenville Airport, while conducting local practice, both engines failed simultaneously. The aircraft lost height and crashed in an uninhabited area. The passenger was killed and the pilot was seriously injured. The pilot recently purchased the aircraft and was not familiar with.
Probable cause:
Both engines stopped in flight due to fuel starvation. The following factors were reported:
- Lack of familiarity with aircraft,
- Mismanagement of fuel,
- Inattentive to fuel supply,
- Fuel starvation,
- Failure of both engines,
- The aircraft was not refueled since purchase,
- Both engines operated from the right main tank.
Final Report: