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Crash of a Cessna 404 Titan II in Englewood: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 30, 2014 at 0429 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N404MG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Denver - Denver
MSN:
404-0813
YOM:
1981
Flight number:
LYM182
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
2566
Captain / Total hours on type:
624.00
Aircraft flight hours:
16681
Circumstances:
The pilot was conducting an early morning repositioning flight of the cargo airplane. Shortly after takeoff, the pilot reported to air traffic control that he had “lost an engine” and would return to the airport. Several witnesses reported that the engines were running rough and one witness reported that he did not hear any engine sounds just before the impact. The airplane impacted trees, a wooden enclosure, a chain-linked fence, and shrubs in a residential area and was damaged by the impact and postimpact fire. The airplane had been parked outside for 5 days before the accident flight and had been plugged in to engine heaters the night before the flight. It was dark and snowing lightly at the time of the accident. The operator reported that no deicing services were provided before the flight and that the pilot mechanically removed all of the snow and ice accumulation. The wreckage and witness statements were consistent with the airplane being in a right-winglow descent but the airplane did not appear to be out of control. Neither of the propellers were at or near the feathered position. The emergency procedures published by the manufacturer for a loss of engine power stated that pilots should first secure the engine and feather the propeller following a loss of engine power and then turn the fuel selector for that engine to “off.” The procedures also cautioned that continued flight might not be possible if the propeller was not feathered. The right fuel selector valve and panel were found in the off position. Investigators were not able to determine why an experienced pilot did not follow the emergency procedures and immediately secure the engine following the loss of engine power. It is not known how much snow and ice had accumulated on the airplane leading up to the accident flight or if the pilot was successful in removing all of the snow and ice with only mechanical means. The on-scene examination of the wreckage and the teardown of both engines did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures. While possible, it could not be determined if water or ice ingestion lead to the loss of engine power at takeoff.
Probable cause:
The loss of power to the right engine for reasons that could not be determined during postaccident examination and teardown and the pilot’s failure to properly configure the
airplane for single-engine flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-310 Navajo B in Englewood: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 1, 1991 at 0653 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N7407L
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Englewood - Des Moines
MSN:
31-790
YOM:
1972
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
6200
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff, while climbing to cruise altitude, the pilot reported the left engine cowl assembly had come off. Witnesses observed the airplane at low altitude and noted that it was 'yawing, sputtering, and rocking back and forth.' They indicated the left engine was not running and that the airplane banked sharply to the right and disappeared behind trees before crashing. An investigation revealed the left propeller had not been feathered. The left engine cowling was found 1.8 miles from the accident site. The three primary (eyebolt) cowl fasteners on the outboard side of the left upper cowl were found unlocked & seven other cowl attaching studs (screws) were missing. The cowling had been removed 16 days before the accident to install an oil/air separator. This was the first flight since that work was performed. The mechanic, who did the work, said he noted several cowl stud fasteners were missing and that he had notified the pilot. The pilot was reported to have replied that he had some fasteners and would take care of the problem. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
In-flight separation of the left engine cowl assembly that was not properly latched, and failure of the pilot to maintain minimum control speed, which resulted in his loss of aircraft control. Factors related to the accident were: an inadequate preflight inspection, inadequate markings/alignment indications to assure that the cowl fasteners were locked, and an insufficiently defined procedure in the flight manual for checking the cowl fasteners.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader near Englewood: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 11, 1988 at 2010 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N9565T
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Englewood - El Paso
MSN:
303-00027
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
4550
Captain / Total hours on type:
42.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1070
Circumstances:
The pilot obtained two weather briefings and filed an IFR flight plan to El Paso, TX. He was not instrument rated. The aircraft departed Englewood at 1959 and disappeared from radar at 2010. The crash site was 11- 1/2 miles southeast of the Kiowa vortac and 36 miles southeast of Englewood. Radar showed a 15-miles wide band of snow showers southeast of the Kiowa vortac. Ground witnesses reported blizzard conditions. Pilot medical certificate stated, 'not valid for night flight or by color control.' Pilot autopsy also disclosed 'myxomatous alteration of the mitral valve, consistent with mitral valve prolapse (floppy mitral valve).' Both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight encounter with weather
Phase of operation: cruise - normal
Findings
1. (f) light condition - dark night
2. (c) flight into known adverse weather - initiated - pilot in command
3. (f) self-induced pressure - pilot in command
4. (f) lack of total instrument time - pilot in command
5. (f) weather condition - high wind
6. (f) weather condition - gusts
7. (f) weather condition - snow
8. (f) weather condition - obscuration
9. (f) weather condition - turbulence
----------
Occurrence #2: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: maneuvering
Findings
10. (c) spatial disorientation - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #3: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Findings
11. Terrain condition - snow covered
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-61 Aerostar (Ted Smith 601P) in Fountain: 2 killed

Date & Time: Nov 12, 1982 at 2303 LT
Registration:
N3641T
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Pueblo – Englewood
MSN:
61P-0818-8063427
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
7200
Aircraft flight hours:
948
Circumstances:
After taking off at approximately 2250, the aircraft was identified on radar and observed to climb on course to an altitude of 10,700 feet. The aircraft then descended thru 10,500 feet and the crew reported they would maintain that altitude. At about 2301 the aircraft was about 5 miles southeast of Colorado Springs and at 10,300 feet when radar contact was lost. The aircraft crashed in that area in a near vertical descent. The outboard 8 feet of the right wing had separated in flight and impacted about 1/4 mile from the main wreckage. The right aileron had sheared in 3 pieces also and was found near the failed wing. There was evidence that the the wing had yielded to a down and up loading (1 cycle) when it separated upward and rearward. All fracture surfaces had evidence of overload failures except the aileron control linkage which was further damaged on impact and could not be evaluated. Both pilots were using medication that was contraindicated for use by airmen and both pilots had little sleep during the previous 48 hours. Before the flight the pilot seemed agitated and the copilot had an odor of beer. Both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: cruise - normal
Findings
1. (c) reason for occurrence undetermined
----------
Occurrence #2: airframe/component/system failure/malfunction
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Findings
2. (f) light condition - night
3. (c) design stress limits of aircraft - exceeded
4. (f) fatigue - pilot in command
5. (f) fatigue - copilot/second pilot
6. Other psychological condition - pilot in command
7. Impairment(alcohol) - copilot/second pilot
8. Impairment(drugs) - pilot in command
9. Impairment(drugs) - copilot/second pilot
10. Flight control,aileron - overload
11. Flight control,aileron - separation
12. Wing,spar - overload
13. Wing,spar - separation
----------
Occurrence #3: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Final Report: