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Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 500 south of Burns: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 11, 2010 at 0855 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N500FV
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Redding - Butte
MSN:
500A-1248-73
YOM:
1962
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1360
Aircraft flight hours:
5375
Circumstances:
The evening prior to the accident, the pilot acquired a computer generated text weather briefing. On the day of the accident, the pilot acquired another computer generated text weather briefing, and then contacted the Flight Service Station (FSS) for an interactive telephonic weather briefing. The information provided in all three briefings indicated that a flight on a direct route between the pilot's point of departure and his planned destination would take him through an area of forecast rain showers, thunderstorms, and cloud tops significantly higher than his intended en route altitude. Although the FSS briefer recommended an alternate route, for which he provided weather information, after departure the pilot flew directly toward his destination airport. While en route, the pilot, who was not instrument rated, encountered instrument meteorological conditions, within which there was an 80 percent probability of icing. After entering the area of instrument meteorological conditions, the airplane was seen exiting the bottom of an overcast cloud layer with a significant portion of its left wing missing. It then made a high velocity steep descent into the terrain. A postaccident inspection of the airplane's structure did not find any evidence of an anomaly that would contribute to the separation of the wing structure, and it is most likely that the wing section separated as a result of the airplane exceeding its structural limitations after the pilot lost control in the instrument meteorological conditions.
Probable cause:
The non-instrument rated pilot's improper decision to continue flight into an area of known instrument meteorological conditions and his failure to maintain control of the airplane after entering those conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12 in Butte: 14 killed

Date & Time: Mar 22, 2009 at 1432 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N128CM
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Oroville - Bozeman
MSN:
403
YOM:
2001
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
13
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
14
Captain / Total flying hours:
8840
Captain / Total hours on type:
1760.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1916
Circumstances:
On March 22, 2009, about 1432 mountain daylight time, a Pilatus PC-12/45, N128CM, was diverting to Bert Mooney Airport (BTM), Butte, Montana, when it crashed about 2,100 feet west of runway 33 at BTM. The pilot and the 13 airplane passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged by impact forces and a postcrash fire. The airplane was owned by Eagle Cap Leasing of Enterprise, Oregon, and was operating as a personal flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed Oroville Municipal Airport, Oroville, California, on an instrument flight rules flight plan with a destination of Gallatin Field, Bozeman, Montana. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.
Probable cause:
The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was:
(1) the pilot’s failure to ensure that a fuel system icing inhibitor was added to the fuel before the flights on the day of the accident;
(2) his failure to take appropriate remedial actions after a low fuel pressure state (resulting from icing within the fuel system) and a lateral fuel imbalance developed, including diverting to a suitable airport before the fuel imbalance became extreme; and
(3) a loss of control while the pilot was maneuvering the left-wing-heavy airplane near the approach end of the runway.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 99 in Butte: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 18, 2006 at 1455 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N54RP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Helena-Butte
MSN:
U-218
YOM:
1983
Flight number:
AMF2591
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
5219
Captain / Total hours on type:
2616.00
Aircraft flight hours:
22169
Aircraft flight cycles:
35539
Circumstances:

The twin engine aircraft was making the cargo flight n° AMF2591 from Helena to Butte with a cargo of 10 pounds on board. It departed Helena at 1435LT and crashed few minutes before landing at Butte Airport. Rescue teams found the debris 2 days later, on 20 March 2006. Both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft G18 in Butte: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jan 26, 1995 at 2230 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N250RP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Seattle-Missoula
MSN:
BA-047
YOM:
1955
Flight number:
MER035
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
14575
Captain / Total hours on type:
2806.00
Aircraft flight hours:
15043

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Butte: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 6, 1986 at 0436 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N421AR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Helena - Butte
MSN:
421C-0254
YOM:
1977
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4000
Aircraft flight hours:
2890
Circumstances:
Pilot was attempting the VOR-B instrument approach to Butte, MT Airport. Pilot reported over the Coppertown vortac inbound on the airport. The procedure turn inbound course to the vortac is 124°. The inbound course to the airport is 094°. The aircraft wreckage was found on the 124° radial 5 miles southwest of the airport. The wind was reported to be 340° at 9 knots. The VOR-B approach terminates at runway 11. Runway 33 is 9,000 feet long and equipped with mirl's and reil's. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight encounter with weather
Phase of operation: approach
Findings
1. (f) weather condition - low ceiling
2. (c) in-flight planning/decision - poor - pilot in command
3. (f) weather condition - snow
4. (c) ifr procedure - not followed - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: approach
Findings
5. (f) terrain condition - mountainous/hilly
6. (c) altitude - improper - pilot in command
7. (c) clearance - not possible - pilot in command
8. (f) visual/aural perception - pilot in command
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II in Butte: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 1, 1980 at 1842 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N36941
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Forsyth - Butte
MSN:
441-0018
YOM:
1977
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
13826
Captain / Total hours on type:
68.00
Circumstances:
On approach to Butte-Bert Mooney Airport, the pilot encountered poor weather conditions and decided to initiate a go-around and to divert to another airport. At low height, the twin engine airplane struck a hill and crashed 11 miles south of the airport. Both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Controlled collision with ground during a missed approach due to improper IFR operation. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Low ceiling,
- Fog,
- Snow.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Grand Commander 690A in Kingston: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 12, 1974 at 1804 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N40MP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Phoenix - Butte
MSN:
690-11116
YOM:
1973
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
2754
Captain / Total hours on type:
200.00
Circumstances:
While cruising by night at an altitude of 17,500 feet on a ferry flight from Phoenix to Butte, the twin engine airplane collided with a USAF General Dynamics F-111A Aardvark registered 67-0055. Following the collision, both aircraft entered a dive and crashed in flames near Kingston. The pilot of the Commander was killed while both military pilots were seriously injured.
Probable cause:
The collision occurred by night when the aircraft was not under radar contact with no control. It is understood that the F-111 crew had a rendezvous with the crew of a USAF Boeing KC-135 refueling plane for a night exercise but he mistook the Commander that was struck from the rear with a 0-10° angle.
Final Report: