Crash of an Embraer EMB-505 Phenom 300 in Blackbushe: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jul 31, 2015 at 1508 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
HZ-IBN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Milan - Blackbushe
MSN:
505-00040
YOM:
2010
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
11000
Captain / Total hours on type:
1180.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft entered the left-end circuit for runway 25 via the crosswind leg. Towards the end of the downwind leg, it overtook a microlight aircraft, before climbing slightly to pass ahead of and above that aircraft. As this climb began, at approximately 1,000 feet above aerodrome level (aal), a TCAS 'descend' Resolution Advisory (RA) was presented to the pilot of HZ-IBN, to resolve a confliction with the microlight. The TCAS RA changed to 'maintain vertical speed' and then 'adjust vertical speed', but these instructions may have been to resolve a second confliction with another aircraft which was above HZ-IBN, to the east of the aerodrome. Following this climb, HZ-IBN the descended at up to 3,000 feet per minute towards the threshold of Runway 25. The aircraft's TCAS annunciated 'clear of conflict' when HZ-IBN was 1,1 NM from the runway threshold, at 1,200 feet aal at a speed of 146 knots, with the landing gear down and flap 3 selected. The aircraft continued its approach with a rate of descent averaged approximately 3,000 feet, the TAWS generated six 'pull up' warnings on final approach and the aircraft crossed the threshold of Runway 25 at approximately 50 feet aal at 150 knots. Tyre marks made by the aircraft at touchdown indicated that it landed approximately 710 metres beyond the Runway 25 threshold. Runway 25 has a declared LDA of 1,059 metres , therefore the aircraft touched down approximately 349 metres before the end of the declared LDA, 438 metres before the end of the paved runway surface. The aircraft departed the paved runway surface at the end of Runway 25 approximately three metres to the left of the extended runway centreline. It then collided with a one meter high earth bank causing the lower section of the nose landing gear and the nose gear doors to detach. The aircraft became airborne again briefly, before colliding with several cars parked at an adjacent business and coming to rest approximately 70 metres beyond the earth bank. The aircraft's wing detached from the fuselage during the impact sequence and an intense fire developed shortly thereafter, consuming the majority of the aircraft. All four occupants were fatally injured.
Probable cause:
Please consult the attached preliminary report.
Final Report:

Crash of a Raytheon 390 Premier I in Blackbushe

Date & Time: Apr 7, 2004 at 0932 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N200PR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Farnborough - Blackbushe
MSN:
RB-79
YOM:
2001
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4511
Captain / Total hours on type:
413.00
Circumstances:
After takeoff the pilot was unable to raise the landing gear and was presented with failure indications affecting both the lift dump and anti skid systems. Following a successful landing at Farnborough, and discussions with the aircraft's maintenance organisation, the aircraft was flown to Blackbushe for further technical investigation. After landing on Runway 26 the aircraft left the runway, struck a series of obstructions and was destroyed: there was no fire and the pilot was uninjured. The support bracket for the right main landing gear weight-on-wheels switch was found to have sustained a pre-impact failure which accounted for the indications reported by the pilot. Five recommendations have been made as a result of this investigation.
Probable cause:
The support bracket for the right main landing gear weight-on-wheels switch was found to have sustained a pre-impact failure which accounted for the indications reported by the pilot.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B200 Super King Air in Blackbushe: 5 killed

Date & Time: Dec 23, 2000 at 1351 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VP-BBK
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Blackbush - Palma de Mallorca
MSN:
BB-1519
YOM:
1995
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
2664
Captain / Total hours on type:
1243.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft, with the pilot and four passengers on board, departed Blackbushe from Runway 08 in fog with a visibility of less than 500 metres. As the aircraft reached the upwind end of the runway it was seen to bank to the left before disappearing from view. It crashed 13 seconds later into a factory complex where a major fire ensued. All on board were fatally injured. A substantial amount of the aircraft structure was consumed by fire. Engineering examination of that which remained showed that there was no malfunction found within the engines, propellers or controls that would have affected the flight. Analysis of the cockpit voice recorder however showed a reduction in one of the propellers rpm as the aircraft rotated that would have led to thrust asymmetry. Through a combination of lack of visual reference, confusion as to the cause of the power reduction and possible disorientation the pilot lost control of the aircraft and although he may have realised the situation seconds before impact with the ground there was insufficient height available to effect a safe recovery.
Probable cause:
Whilst the CVR does not provide any comments by the pilot as to the problems he was experiencing, spectral analysis of the CVR recording indicates that a significant difference in propeller rpm occurred at rotation when the pilot would normally have removed his right hand from the power levers. There was no evidence of a malfunction in either engine or the propeller control systems thus it is probable that migration of a power lever(s) occurred due to insufficient friction being set on the power lever friction control. The fiction control had been slackened during recent maintenance and it was possible that it was not adjusted sufficiently by the pilot during his checks prior to takeoff. His simulator training had included engine failures but as far as could be established, the pilot had not encountered or been trained for the situation of power lever(s) migration during takeoff. With his level of experience the pilot should have controlled the resultant asymmetric thrust and in reasonable conditions continued the takeoff to a safe height where analysis of the problem could have been carried out. In the event the takeoff was carried out in extremely low visibility conditions leading to the pilot's total loss of any ground references within seconds of lift off. Having controlled the aircraft initially the lack of visual reference with the ground, possible confusion with attitude instrument bank angle display, physical disorientation brought about by cockpit activity and confusion as to the exact nature of the problem led the pilot to lose control of the aircraft at a low altitude. The unusual attitude developed by the aircraft and the reason for the power asymmetry may have been recognised by the pilot several seconds before impact however there was insufficient height available for him to effect a safe recovery. The transition from visual to instrument flight in the low visibility conditions existing at the time of departure was considered to be a major contributory factor in this accident.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II in Blackbushe: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 26, 1987 at 1145 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-MOXY
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Leeds - Blackbushe
MSN:
441-0154
YOM:
1980
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Aircraft flight hours:
5135
Circumstances:
The accident occurred at Blackbushe airfield following a go-around from an approach to land on runway 26. The aircraft appeared to begin the go-around normally but was then seen to bank to the left and start turning left. The turn continued through 135° of heading, at a low height, with the bank angle increasing progressively, until the aircraft crashed into trees, semi-inverted, approximately 550 meters from the runway 26 threshold. The reason for the initiation of the go-around was an unsafe main landing gear indication caused by a defective microswitch. The reasons for the subsequent loss of control could not be determined.
Probable cause:
The effectiveness of the investigations was considerably reduced by the lack of flight recorders. There was no evidence of pilot incapacitation. Extensive examination of the wreckage revealed no flap or flying control malfunction, neither was there any evidence of failure of either engine or propeller control mechanism. The curved flight path of the aircraft from go-around to impact and progressive increase in bank angle suggest that an asymmetric thrust condition was most probable.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in Blackbushe: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 19, 1975 at 0811 LT
Operator:
Registration:
G-BBPV
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Blackbushe - Stansted
MSN:
31-7305097
YOM:
1973
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
5391
Captain / Total hours on type:
122.00
Aircraft flight hours:
771
Circumstances:
The aircraft was en route from Blackbushe to Stansted when about three minutes after takeoff it descended to aerodrome level and flew into some trees which were obscured by fog and low cloud. The aircraft caught fire and the pilot, the sole occupant, was killed.
Probable cause:
The accident was caused by the aircraft descending into fog covered ground. No reason for this loss of height could be positively established but there is a strong possibility that the pilot's ability to fly the aircraft became impaired by the onset of symptoms associated with coronary artery disease.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 610 Viking 1B in Blackbushe: 34 killed

Date & Time: May 1, 1957 at 2220 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AJBO
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Blackbushe – Tripoli
MSN:
241
YOM:
1947
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
30
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
34
Captain / Total flying hours:
6800
Captain / Total hours on type:
4800.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft was on a trooping flight from Blackbushe Airport to Idris in Tripoli and was carrying a crew of four, one supernumerary crew as passenger and thirty passengers. A few seconds after 2214LT the aircraft was observed to make its run and to take off. At 2216, it called the control tower and passed the following message, "I have got a port engine failure I am making a left-hand circuit to come in again". Having completed the downwind and base legs of this circuit, the aircraft crashed in a wood just as, or just after, it had turned onto the final approach and at a distance of about 1 200 yards from the threshold of the runway. Thirty-four of the thirty-five persons on board lost their lives.
Probable cause:
The accident was caused by the failure of the captain to maintain height and a safe flying speed when approaching to land on one engine after the failure (or suspected failure) of the port engine for reasons unknown.
Final Report:

Crash of a Handley Page H.P.81 Hermes IV/A in Blackbushe: 7 killed

Date & Time: Nov 5, 1956 at 2352 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-ALDJ
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tripoli – Blackbushe
MSN:
81/11
YOM:
1950
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
74
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
The aircraft was flying under charter to the Air Ministry and had flown from Idris Airport, Tripoli with a crew of 6 and 74 passengers, nearly all members of servicemen's families. Shortly before midnight, on landing at Blackbushe in poor visibility, the aircraft undershot the runway, hit a beech tree 3,617 feet short of the threshold, swung sharply to port, came down among pine trees about 3,000 feet from the beech tree and caught fire. Three crew members were killed by the impact and four children lost their lives due to fire.
Probable cause:
The most probable cause of the accident is that in difficult conditions and while suffering from a degree of fatigue above the normal, the captain, relying on his vision of the airport lights to assess his height, judged his height to be higher than it actually was.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 701 Viscount in Blackbushe

Date & Time: Jan 20, 1956 at 0850 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AMOM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Blackbushe - Blackbushe
MSN:
26
YOM:
1953
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft took off from London Airport at 0755LT on a training flight, which was part of a routine base check being carried out by a training captain on a line captain. Having completed the first part of the check the aircraft landed at Blackbushe. At approximately 0850LT a takeoff was commenced from this airport for another exercise. On reaching the takeoff safety speed the training captain simulated a starboard outer engine failure. At this point the aircraft was just leaving the ground and as it did so the starboard inner propeller was seen to be stopping and the aircraft began turning to the right with an increasing amount of bank. It rose to about 30 feet and then descended and hit the ground at a point 250 yards from the runway in a steeply banked, nose-down attitude. It cartwheeled, slid along the ground backwards for 200 yards and came to rest just inside the northwest boundary of the aerodrome. The aircraft sustained major impact damage and fire broke out which almost completely destroyed it. The five occupants escaped with only slight injuries.
Probable cause:
The accident was due to an error by the training captain who operated No. 3 high pressure cock lever instead of No. 4 when simulating a failure of No. 4 engine during take-off. This resulted in the loss of all power from both starboard engines at a critical point of the take-off.
Final Report:

Crash of an Avro 652 Anson C.19 off Calshot

Date & Time: Aug 6, 1955
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
G-AHIG
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Jersey – Blackbushe
MSN:
1322
YOM:
1946
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While overflying the Isle of Wight, enroute from Jersey to Blackbushe, the pilot encountered technical problems with both engines that lost power. He reduced his altitude and ditched the aircraft on the Solent, off Calshot. While the aircraft sank and was lost, all 11 occupants were quickly rescued by the crew of a yacht and then transferred to shore.
Probable cause:
It was determined that both engines failed in-flight due to fuel exhaustion. It is believed that the pilot failed to prepare his flight properly and did not refuel at Jersey (Saint Peter) Airport.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 627 Viking 1B in Blackbushe

Date & Time: Aug 15, 1954 at 1000 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AIXS
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Blackbushe – Nice
MSN:
234
YOM:
1946
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
32
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Ten minutes after takeoff from Blackbushe, at an altitude of 6,000 feet, an oil leak occurred on the right engine that was shot down and its propeller feathered. The crew received the permission to return to Blackbushe. On final approach, at a speed of 100 knots, the aircraft stalled and crashed in flames in a field located 135 yards short of runway 26 threshold. All 37 occupants evacuated the cabin and four of them were injured, two seriously. The aircraft was destroyed by fire.
Probable cause:
The accident was the result of the captain allowing the aircraft to stall when making a single engine approach to land. A contributory factor was distraction of the captain's attention by the flickering of the undercarriage red indicator lights during a critical stage of the approach. The starboard engine was also damaged by fire and was removed for detailed examination by the Engine Division of the Bristol Aeroplane Company Ltd. Their report stated that the rear of the crankcase had been almost consumed by fire and that a number of cylinder barrels were severely burned. A detailed strip examination did not disclose any mechanical defect and no reason for the failure was established.
Final Report: