Crash of a Grumman G-73 Mallard in Perth: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 26, 2017
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-CQA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Serpentine - Serpentine
MSN:
J-35
YOM:
1948
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The aircraft left Serpentine Airfield at 1628LT with a pilot and his wife on board. They were performing a demo flight vertical to Perth and the Swan River to take part to the Australian Day celebrations. While cruising at an altitude of about 150 feet, the pilot attempted a turn to the left when the aircraft lost height and crashed in a near vertical attitude into the Swan River. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Partenavia P.68 in Rottnest Island

Date & Time: Nov 12, 2006 at 1500 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-IYK
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Rottnest Island-Perth
MSN:
138
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:

Shortly after takeoff, the twin engine aircraft crashed in a salt lake located near the airport. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact while all occupants escaped with minous injuries.

Crash of a Beechcraft Super King Air 200 in Burketown: 8 killed

Date & Time: Sep 4, 2000 at 1510 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VH-SKC
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Perth-Leonora
MSN:
BB-0047
YOM:
1975
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
8
Captain / Total flying hours:
2053
Captain / Total hours on type:
138.00

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2 Marquise in Australia: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 26, 1990 at 0105 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
VH-MUA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Perth-Port Hedland
MSN:
0746
YOM:
1979
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
11030
Captain / Total hours on type:
51.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1902

Crash of a Swearingen SA226TC Metro II in Esperance

Date & Time: May 13, 1980 at 0745 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-SWO
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Perth - Esperance
MSN:
TC-275
YOM:
1978
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
9010
Captain / Total hours on type:
1155.00
Circumstances:
Weather conditions at Esperance were fine; there was no cloud, visibility was in excess of 30 km and the surface wind was from the northwest at 5 to 10 knots. The aircraft entered the circuit on a left downwind leg for an approach to Runway 29. The flaps were lowered, firstly a quarter and then half-way, on the downwind leg and the landing gear was extended just before the aircraft turned onto a base leg. This configuration, and an airspeed of 133 knots (best single - engine rate of climb speed), was maintained until after the aircraft was straightened onto final approach. At an altitude of 1100 feet, the pilot considered he was at Decision Height and committed to land. He lowered full flaps and reduced the airspeed to 115 knots. At about this time, as he was retarding the power levers, the right engine flamed out. The pilot reported that he promptly sensed the engine failure and checked the engine instruments while re-opening both power levers. He noted both torque and fuel flow indication s for the right engine were zero. He briefly considered retracting the landing gear and flaps but decided to do neither. Left engine power was increased initially to the maximum available of 940°C ITT (Inter-turbine temperature) and then adjusted to the normal maximum limit of 923°C ITT. The right propeller was feathered. During this period the aircraft banked to the right and turned away from the runway. Its airspeed had reduced and the rate of descent increased. The turn had been opposed but the pilot found that the application of full left rudder and aileron would not enable him to maintain runway heading, although the airspeed was above the minimum control airspeed of 94 knots, specified in the aircraft flight manual. It was evident to the pilot that the aircraft would land short of the aerodrome, amongst trees to the right of the runway approach path. He therefore abandoned his efforts to regain the normal approach path and allowed the aircraft to turn further to the right, towards a large, clear paddock. Just before touchdown, he observed a power pole on his selected landing path and he again turned further right to avoid it. During this turn the right wing tip struck the ground. The nosegear then impacted heavily and collapsed . The aircraft slid and bounced across the ground for 188 metres before coming to rest. Fuel from ruptured line s ignite d under the left engine , but the fire was slow to develop and the occupants were able to make an orderly evacuation . By the time the fire brigade arrived from Esperance township, the fire had spread and most of the aircraft was consumed.
Probable cause:
The right engine had flamed out because of fuel starvation, when a spur gear in the fuel control drive train failed. Five teeth of the spur gear had broken off and the remaining teeth were badly worn. The failures and abnormal wear were due to looseness of the torque sensor housing, in which the spur gear was mounted, allowing the gear to move out of its correct alignment. The housing had probably loosened because of vibration, as its natural frequency was close to some frequencies generated by the engine during normal operation. The following contributing factors were reported:
- The natural frequency of the torque sensor housings in the engines fitted to VH-SWO were susceptible to vibration frequencies generated by the engines during normal operation,
- Vibration loosened the torque sensor housing on the right engine, which in turn led to misalignment of a spur gear in the fuel drive train, failure of the gear and fuel starvation
of the engine,
- The engine failed when the aircraft was being operated in a landing configuration which precluded a successful continuation of the landing approach,
- The landing procedure used by the pilot was in accordance with the operator's Company Operations Manual, which did not appreciate the poor performance and handing' difficulties of the Swearingen SA226TC in the event of an engine failure in the landing configuration.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 720 Viscount near Port Hedland: 26 killed

Date & Time: Dec 31, 1968 at 1135 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-RMQ
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Perth – Port Hedland
MSN:
45
YOM:
1954
Flight number:
MV1750
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
22
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
26
Captain / Total flying hours:
19129
Captain / Total hours on type:
367.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2660
Copilot / Total hours on type:
143
Circumstances:
Flight 1750 was a scheduled domestic flight from Perth to Port Hedland in the State of Western Australia. Whilst taxiing for take-off on runway 02 at Perth Airport, the crew received and acknowledged an air traffic clearance communicated by Perth Tower. Of the alternative clearances offered, the pilot-in-command elected to proceed via the 030° radial of the Perth Very High Frequency Omni-Range (VOR), to Ballidu, whilst climbing to FL 170. Take-off was normal and the crew reported the departure time as 0836 hours Western Standard Time. At 0839 hours the pilot-in-command reported that he was climbing at an indicated airspeed of 155 kt, instead of the 175 kt proposed in the flight plan, because of turbulence which he first encountered at 1 500 ft. During this climb the co-pilot also advised Perth that the aircraft would continue its climb beyond the proposed FL 170 and cruise at FL 190. Apart from these minor changes to the flight plan the aircraft continued normally along the intended route with position reports being transmitted as scheduled to Perth Flight Service Centre, Meekatharra Flight Service Unit and Port Hedland Flight Service Centre. At 1114 hours the aircraft advised Port Hedland that it was abeam Wittenoom Gorge at FL 190 and that its estimated time of arrival at Port Hedland was 1142 hours. At 1120 hours the flight advised that it would be commencing its descent from FL 190 in three minutes and at 11-34 hours it reported that it was 30 miles by Distance Measuring Equipment south of Port Hedland-and had left 7 000 ft on descent. The flight service officer at Port Hedland acknowledged this message and transmitted the surface wind and temperature conditions and the altimeter setting for landing at Port Hedland. When this communication was not acknowledged further calls were made but no further communication from the aircraft was heard or recorded. At about the time that the aircraft failed to respond to the radio communication, two persons, each in different positions, saw the aircraft descending rapidly and steeply although these observations were made from distances of 44 and 64 miles respectively. Neither of these eyewitnesses was able to observe any impact with the ground because of intervening high terrain. At 1212 hours a Cessna 337 aircraft left Port Hedland to search along the route which the aircraft had been expected to follow and, eleven minutes later, the pilot of the search aircraft saw the burning wreckage of the Viscount aircraft, close to the intended route. Approximately one hour later a ground party from Port Hedland reached the scene of the accident. The location of the wreckage was later determined to be 28.1 miles on a bearing of 184' true from Port Hedland Airport. The aircraft was totally destroyed and none of the 26 occupants survived the crash.
Probable cause:
The cause of the accident was that the fatigue endurance of the starboard inner main spar lower boom was substantially reduced by the insertion of a flared bush at station 143 when the margin of safety associated with the retirement life specified for such booms did not ensure that this boom would achieve its retirement life in the presence of such a defect.
Final Report:

Crash of an Avro 652 Anson I in Carnamah

Date & Time: Nov 7, 1952
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-AVS
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Perth – Carnamah
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crashed on approach to Carnamah, while on a flight from Perth. Both occupants were injured and the aircraft was written off.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.104 Dove near Kalgoorlie: 7 killed

Date & Time: Oct 15, 1951 at 1520 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-AQO
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Perth – Kalgoorlie
MSN:
04002
YOM:
1946
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
While descending to Kalgoorlie, the twin engine aircraft went out of control, dove into the ground and crashed in a prairie located about 22 km west of Kalgoorlie, in the Kurrawang Natural Reserve. All seven occupants were killed, among them Captain Charles M. Hood and hostess/radio operator Dorothy Reilly.
Probable cause:
It was determined that the accident was caused by the physical loss of the left wing that detached in flight due to metal fatigue.

Crash of a Douglas DC-4-1009 near York: 29 killed

Date & Time: Jun 26, 1950 at 2212 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-ANA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Perth – Adelaide – Melbourne
MSN:
42910
YOM:
1946
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
24
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
29
Circumstances:
The four engine aircraft christened 'Amana' left Perth Airport runway 29 at 2150LT on a regular schedule service to Melbourne via Adelaide. Shortly after takeoff, the crew encountered technical problems with the engine number four that must be shut down. Later, few other problems occurred on the three remaining engines, and in such situation, the captain decided to return to Perth for a safe landing. During the last turn completed by night and at low height, the aircraft hit trees and crashed in a wooded area located 19 km northwest of York. The aircraft was totally destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire. A passenger was seriously injured while 28 other occupants were killed. Six days later, the only survivor died from his terrible injuries.
Probable cause:
The Inquiry found that the aircraft suffered a total loss of engine power on at least one occasion, followed by rapid loss of height until it struck the ground. However, the evidence did not allow the court to determine the cause of the total loss of engine power. Consequently, the court was unable to determine the cause of the accident.