Crash of a PZL-Mielec AN-2 in Chernoye: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 2, 2017
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RA-35171
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Chernoye - Chernoye
MSN:
1G113-10
YOM:
30
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The pilot and his passenger were taking part to an airshow at Chernoye Aerodrome, celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Antonov AN-2. The pilot was completing a steep turn to the left to join the grassy runway when the airplane lost height and struck the ground with its left wing and crashed in flames. Both occupants were killed and the aircraft was totally destroyed.

Crash of a Grumman G-73 Mallard in Perth: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 26, 2017
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-CQA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Serpentine - Serpentine
MSN:
J-35
YOM:
1948
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The aircraft left Serpentine Airfield at 1628LT with a pilot and his wife on board. They were performing a demo flight vertical to Perth and the Swan River to take part to the Australian Day celebrations. While cruising at an altitude of about 150 feet, the pilot attempted a turn to the left when the aircraft lost height and crashed in a near vertical attitude into the Swan River. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Comp Air CA-8 in Merritt Island

Date & Time: Nov 28, 2012 at 1435 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N155JD
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Merritt Island - Merritt Island
MSN:
998205
YOM:
2001
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5569
Captain / Total hours on type:
102.00
Aircraft flight hours:
923
Circumstances:
On November 28, 2012, about 1435 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Comp Air 8 (CA-8), N155JD, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged during a go-around, while attempting to land at the Merritt Island Airport (COI), Merritt Island, Florida. The certificated commercial pilot sustained serious injuries and a passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The pilot reported that he flew from Smithfield, North Carolina, to Marion, South Carolina (MAO), without incident. After refueling, he departed MAO for COI. While en route, approximately 150 miles north of Ormond Beach, Florida, the airplane began to experience a left rolling tendency, which required right aileron control inputs to counteract. He configured the fuel selector to the left fuel tank in an attempt to lighten the wing and compensate for the turning tendency; however, the force required to maintain directional control became greater as the flight progressed. The pilot subsequently entered the traffic pattern at COI for runway 29, a 3,601-foot-long, 75- foot-wide, asphalt runway. While maneuvering in the traffic pattern, full right aileron control was required to maintain straight and level flight, and only a slight relaxing of right aileron control was needed to turn left. The pilot had difficulty compensating for a northwest crosswind, which resulted in the airplane drifting to the southern edge of the runway. He performed a go-around and lined-up on the northern side of the runway 29 approach course for a second landing attempt, which again resulted in a go-around. When the pilot applied engine power, the airplane began to slowly roll to the left despite right aileron and rudder control inputs. He decreased engine power; however, the airplane's left wing struck the ground and the airplane flipped-over. The left wing, propeller, and empennage separated during the impact sequence. The airplane's flight controls were electrically actuated. On site examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector did not reveal any preimpact malfunctions, which would have precluded normal operation. The fuel tanks were compromised during the accident. The airplane's rudder, elevator, and aileron control servos were removed for further examination. According to the FAA inspector, the rudder and elevator control servos functioned normally; however, the aileron control servo sustained impact damage during the accident sequence and could not be tested. The six seat, high-wing, tail-wheel, turboprop airplane, serial number 998205, was constructed primarily of composite material and was equipped with a Walter M601D series, 650 horsepower engine, with an AVIA 3-bladed constant-speed propeller. According to FAA records, the airplane was issued an experimental airworthiness certificate on April 26, 2001. The airplane was purchased from one of the builders, by the commercial pilot, through a corporation, on September 30, 2012. At that time, the airplane had been operated for about 925 total hours and had undergone a condition inspection. The pilot reported about 5,570 hours of total flight experience, which included about 100 hours in the same make and model as the accident airplane. In addition, the pilot had accumulated about 23 hours and 5 hours in make and model, during the 30 and 90 days preceding the accident, respectively. Winds reported at an airport located about 8 miles southeast of the accident site, about the time of the accident, were from 340 degrees at 16 knots.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper decision to continue a cross-country flight as a primary control (aileron) system anomaly progressively worsened. Contributing to the accident was an aileron control system anomaly, the reason for which could not be determined because the aileron control system could not be tested due to impact damage, and the pilot’s inability to compensate for crosswind conditions encountered during the approach due to the aileron problem.
Final Report:

Crash of a Sukhoï Superjet 100-95 in Mt Salak: 45 killed

Date & Time: May 9, 2012 at 1431 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RA-97004
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Jakarta - Jakarta
MSN:
95004
YOM:
2009
Flight number:
RA36801
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
41
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
45
Captain / Total flying hours:
10347
Captain / Total hours on type:
1348.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3318
Copilot / Total hours on type:
625
Aircraft flight hours:
843
Aircraft flight cycles:
500
Circumstances:
Aircraft was performing a demo flight and left Jakarta-Halim Perdanakasuma Airport at 1400LT with 41 passengers (potential buyers) on board and a crew of four. About thirty minutes later, while turning around Mount Salak, pilots received the authorization to descend from 10,000 feet to 6,000 feet in low visibility. Aircraft hit the edge of a cliff and crashed few yards further and was totally destroyed by impact and post impact fire. SAR teams arrived on scene 18 hours later and all 45 occupants were killed. At the time of the accident, weather conditions were marginal with clouds shrouding both Mount Salak and Mount Gede. First accident involving a Sukhoi Superjet 100. Present model was manufactured 09AUG2009 and totalized 843 flying hours for 500 cycles. Captain had 10,347 flying hours and was a test pilot by Sukhoi Civil Aircraft Company.
Probable cause:
- The flight crew was not aware of the mountainous area in the vicinity of the flight path due to various factors such as available charts, insufficient briefing and statements of the potential customer that resulted in inappropriate response to the TAWS warning. The impact could have been avoided by appropriate action of the pilot up to 24 seconds after the first TAWS warning.
- The Jakarta Radar service had not established the minimum vectoring altitudes and the Jakarta Radar system was not equipped with functioning MSAW for the particular area around Mount Salak.
- Distraction of the flight crew from prolonged conversation not related to the progress of the flight, resulted in the pilot flying not constantly changing the aircraft heading while in orbit. Consequently, the aircraft unintentionally exited the orbit.
Final Report:

Crash of a Boeing B-17G-105-VE Flying Fortress in Aurora

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2011 at 0930 LT
Registration:
N390TH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Aurora - Aurora
MSN:
8643
YOM:
1944
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On June 13, 2011, about 0947 central daylight time, a Boeing B-17G "Flying Fortress" airplane, N390TH, experienced an in-flight fire and performed an emergency landing near Oswego, Illinois. One passenger sustained a minor injury. The 3 crew members and 3 other passengers were not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged as a result of a fire that ensued after it was on the ground. The aircraft was registered to and operated by The Liberty Foundation under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a repositioning flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Aurora Municipal Airport (ARR), Aurora, Illinois at 0938. The accident airplane departed ARR with a North American SNJ-4, N299FM, as a flight of two airplanes. About 6 minutes after takeoff, the pilot of the SNJ airplane informed the flight crew of the B-17 that they had an in-flight fire. The SNJ pilot subsequently advised the B-17 crew to execute an emergency landing to a field. The flight crew of the B-17 reported that they smelled smoke and were attempting to locate the source when they received the call from the pilot of the SNJ. They had already shut off the electrical generators in an effort to isolate the problem. Once they determined that the fire was on the left wing, they elected to shut down the number 2 engine and discharge the fire bottles. Following the advice from the SNJ pilot, the B-17 flight crew performed an emergency landing to a corn field about 8 miles southeast of ARR. The B-17 came to rest near the east end of the corn field. The crew and passengers exited the airplane as the fire persisted. Emergency crews responding to the airplane were hampered by muddy field conditions, and the fire ultimately consumed the fuselage and inboard portion of both wings.
Final Report:

Crash of a Travel Air 4000 in Fort Myers

Date & Time: Nov 14, 2009 at 1018 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N3823
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Myers - Fort Myers
MSN:
306
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1789
Captain / Total hours on type:
60.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5284
Circumstances:
During approach, the pilot of the tailwheel-equipped biplane flew along at 20-30 feet above the runway until he was at midfield. The biplane touched down, bounced back in to the air, touched down again, and bounced once more prior to touching down for a third time in a nose-high attitude. The biplane then veered to the right, the right wing dipped, and the biplane cartwheeled, coming to rest inverted. The pilot had 60 hours of flight experience in the biplane. The previous owner had advised the pilot that landing the biplane took patience to land it perfectly and that attempting to land the biplane on asphalt with low experience could cause the biplane to bump repeatedly. He also advised that if the pilot pulled back on the control stick too soon during landing it could result in ballooning and porpoising.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper recovery from a bounced landing and failure to maintain directional control, which resulted in a ground loop. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's minimal experience in the airplane make and model.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan in Aerfort na Minna (Aran Island): 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 5, 2007 at 1449 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N208EC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Inis Meáin-Aerfort na Minna
MSN:
208-1153
YOM:
2005
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
9001
Captain / Total hours on type:
476.00
Aircraft flight hours:
320
Aircraft flight cycles:
275
Circumstances:
The aircraft was performing a demonstration flight for business men who wanted to buy it. After a tour in the Galway (Connemara) region, the single aircraft was returning to Aerfort na Minna airport. On landing, the aircraft crashed and was destroyed. Two passengers were killed while 7 others were injured.

Crash of a Grob G180 SPn in Mindelheim-Mattsies: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 29, 2006 at 1315 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-CGSP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Mindelheim - Mindelheim
MSN:
97002
YOM:
2006
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Aircraft flight hours:
28
Aircraft flight cycles:
40
Circumstances:
The pilot, sole occupant, was performing a demonstration flight on this second prototype to a group of invited guests staying on the ground. Shortly after takeoff, the aircraft turned to rejoin the landing pattern when it plunged into a meadow approximately 4,5 miles from the runway. The French pilot Gérard Guillaumaud was killed and the aircraft, the first Grob business all-composite jet was completely destroyed upon impact.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan in California: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 28, 2006 at 1655 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N208WE
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Thermal-Ontario
MSN:
208-1171
YOM:
2005
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2300
Aircraft flight hours:
52
Circumstances:
The aircraft and its two occupants were flying to Ontario, California. During flight, the single engine aircraft struck a mountain slope near Yucaipa, California. Both occupants were killed. According to Palm Springs Weather Briefing Center, sky was broken at 7,500 & 9,000 feet at the time of the accident. The pilot was making a demonstration flight to the passenger, president of Pacific Aircraft Sales Company.

Crash of a SCAN-30 Super Widgeon in Lake Garda

Date & Time: Mar 29, 2005
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
OE-FWS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Salzburg - Lake Garda
MSN:
30
YOM:
1949
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft experienced a problem while landing on water north of Sirmione, on the Lake Garda, north Italy. The aircraft sank while the crew escaped unharmed.