Crash of a Britten Norman BN-2B-27 Islander in Puerto Montt: 6 killed

Date & Time: Apr 16, 2019 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
CC-CYR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Puerto Montt - Ayacara
MSN:
2169
YOM:
1983
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Puerto Montt-Marcel Marchant (La Paloma) Airport, while in initial climb, the twin engine airplane lost height and crashed in flames onto a house located in a residential area about 400 meters from the airfield. The house and the aircraft were totally destroyed by a post crash fire and all six occupants have been killed. Two people in the house were slightly injured.

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in Madeira: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 12, 2019 at 1516 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N400JM
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Cincinnati - Cincinnati
MSN:
31-8152002
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On March 12, 2019, at 1516 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-31-350, N400JM, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain in Madeira, Ohio. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by Marc, Inc. under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a commercial aerial surveying flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that originated from Cincinnati Municipal Airport-Lunken Field (LUK), Cincinnati, Ohio, at 1051. Review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) preliminary air traffic control (ATC) and radar data revealed that the airplane flew several surveying tracks outside of Cincinnati before proceeding north to fly tracks near Dayton. The pilot reported to ATC that he was having a fuel problem and requested "direct" to LUK and a lower altitude. The controller provided the position of Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport (MGY), which was located 8 miles ahead. The pilot reported MGY in sight but requested to continue to LUK. When the pilot checked in with the subsequent ATC facility, he reported that the fuel issue was resolved. Seven miles north of LUK, the pilot established radio contact with the LUK tower controller. He advised the controller that the airplane was experiencing a fuel problem and he did not think it was going to reach the airport. The airplane slowed to a ground speed of 80 knots before the air traffic controller noted a simultaneous loss of radar and radio contact about 5 nautical miles north of LUK. A relative of the pilot reported that the pilot told him the airplane "had a fuel leak and it was killing his sinuses" about 1 week prior to the accident. A company employee revealed that the airplane had a fuel leak in the left wing, and that the airplane was due to be exchanged with another company PA-31-350 the week before the accident occurred so that the fuel leak could be isolated and repaired. The accident airplane remained parked for a few days, was not exchanged, and then the accident pilot was brought in to continue flying the airplane. According to witnesses, the airplane flew "very low" and the engine sputtered before making two loud "pop" or "back-fire" sounds. One witness reported that after sputtering, the airplane "was on its left side flying crooked." Another witness reported that the "unusual banking" made the airplane appear to be flying "like a stunt in an airshow." Two additional witnesses reported that the airplane was flying 100-120 ft above ground level in a southerly direction before it turned to the left and "nosedived." Another witness reported that he could see the entire belly of the airplane and the airplane nose was pointing down toward the ground just prior to the airplane impacting a tree. A witness from an adjacent residence reported that there was a "whitish gray smoke coming from the left engine" after the accident, and that a small flame began rising" from that area when he was on the phone with 9-1-1 about 3 minutes after the accident. According to FAA airmen records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land and instrument airplane. The pilot also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine and instrument airplane and a ground instructor certificate. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued November 8, 2018. Examination of pilot's logbooks revealed 6,392 total hours of flight experience as of February 19, 2019, including 1,364 hours in the accident airplane make and model. His most recent logged flight review was completed January 31, 2017. According to FAA airworthiness records, the twin-engine airplane was manufactured in 1981. It was powered by two Lycoming, 350-horsepower engines, which drove two 3-bladed, constant speed, counter-rotating propellers. Examination of the accident site and wreckage revealed that the airplane impacted a tree and private residence before it came to rest upright on a 335° heading. All major portions of the airplane were located on site. The fuselage was substantially damaged. The instrument panel was fragmented and destroyed. The engine control levers were fire damaged and all levers were in the full forward position. Control continuity was established from the flight controls to the flight control surfaces except for one elevator cable attachment, which exhibited a tensile overload fracture. The left wing remained attached to the fuselage. The outboard leading edge of the left wing was crushed upward and aft, and the inboard section displayed thermal and impact damage. The right wing outboard of the right nacelle was impact separated, and a section of the right wing came to rest on the roof of the home. The leading edge of the right wing section displayed a semi-circular crush area about 1 ft in diameter. The left horizontal stabilizer and elevator were dented. The right horizontal stabilizer and elevator were bet upward at the tip. Measurement of the rudder trim barrel revealed a nose-right trim setting. Both engines remained attached to their respective wings. The left engine remained attached at the mount, however the mount was bent and fractured in multiple locations. The engine was angled upward about 75°. All but 4 inches of the left propeller was buried and located at initial ground impact point, which was about 13 ft from the left engine. The right engine was found attached to the right wing and its respective engine mounts, however the engine mounts were fractured in multiple locations. All but 6 inches of the right propeller was buried and located at the initial ground impact point, which was about 18 ft from the right engine. The left engine crankshaft would not rotate upon initial examination. Impact damage was visible to ignition harness leads on both sides of the engine. Both magnetos remained secured and produced sparks at all leads when tested. Less than 2 ounces of fuel was observed within the fuel inlet of the fuel servo upon removal of the servo. The sample tested negative for water. The fuel servo was disassembled and both diaphragms were present and damage free with no signs of tears. The fuel inlet screen was found unobstructed. Rotation of the engine crankshaft was achieved through the vacuum pump drive after the removal of impact damaged pushrods. Spark plugs showed coloration consistent with normal operation and electrodes remained mechanically undamaged. A borescope inspection of all cylinders did not reveal any anomalies. The oil filter was opened, inspected, and no debris was noted. Fuel injectors were removed and unobstructed. Residual or no fuel was found during the examination and removal of components such as fuel lines, injector lines and the fuel pump. The right engine crankshaft would not rotate upon initial examination. Minor impact damage was visible to ignition harness leads. Cylinder Nos. 2, 4, and 6 displayed varying degrees of impact damage to their top sides. The alternator mount was found fractured and the alternator was not present at the time of engine examination. Spark plugs showed coloration consistent with normal operation and electrodes remained mechanically undamaged. Both magnetos produced sparks at all leads when tested. The fuel servo was dissembled and both diaphragms were present and free of damage with no signs of tears. Engine crankshaft rotation was achieved through the vacuum pump drive after the removal of impact damaged pushrods. A borescope inspection of all cylinders did not reveal any anomalies. The oil filter was opened, inspected and no debris was noted. Fuel injectors were removed and were unobstructed. The oil suction screen was found unobstructed but contained nonferrous pieces of material. Fuel was found during examination of the right engine fuel lines, injector lines, and the fuel pump. Both propellers were separated from the engine mounting flanges. Examination of the right propeller revealed that all blades exhibited aft bending and bending opposite rotation, twisting leading edge down, and chordwise rotational scoring on both face and camber sides. Examination of the left propeller revealed that two blades exhibited aft bending with no remarkable twist or leading-edge damage. One blade exhibited no remarkable bending or twisting. All three blades exhibited mild chordwise/rotational abrasion. The wreckage was retained by the NTSB for further examination.

Crash of a Cessna 414A Chancellor in Yorba Linda: 5 killed

Date & Time: Feb 3, 2019 at 1345 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N414RS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Fullerton - Fullerton
MSN:
414A-0821
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
On February 3, 2019, at 1345 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 414, N414RS, experienced an inflight breakup over Yorba Linda, California, about 11 miles west of the departure airport Fullerton Municipal Airport (FUL), Fullerton, California. The pilot and four individuals on the ground sustained fatal injuries, two individuals on the ground sustained serious injuries and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the private pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 cross-country personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed over the accident location, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed at 1339, with a planned destination of Minden-Tahoe Airport (MEV), Minden, Nevada. Radar and audio communications data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that after departing FUL, the pilot initiated a climbing left turn to the east. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) existed at the departure airport, however, preliminary information indicated that the weather transitioned to instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) with precipitation, microburst and rain showers over the accident area. During the takeoff clearance, the FUL tower air traffic controller cautioned the pilot regarding deteriorating weather, about 4 miles east of FUL. Radar data showed that 5 1/2 minutes after takeoff, the airplane had climbed to an altitude of about 7,800 ft above ground level before it started a rapid descending right turn and subsequently impacted the ground. Numerous witnesses who were located near the accident site, saw the airplane exit the clouds at a high rate of descent before parts of the airplane started to break off. One witness reported that he, "observed an aircraft emerge from the overcast layer on a northwesterly heading with a nose down pitch of approximately 60 degrees, pointed directly at my location with no discernable movement. It remained in that attitude for approximately 4 to 5 seconds before initiating a high-speed dive recovery. Approaching the bottom of the recovery the aircraft began to roll to its right. As it did, the left horizontal stabilizer departed the aircraft, immediately followed by the remainder of the empennage. The left wing then appeared to shear off just outside of the number one (left) engine igniting the left wing. After which, the aircraft disappeared behind the hill to the northeast of the observed location, trailing flames behind it. The sound of an explosion and large plume of black smoke immediately followed." Examination of the accident site revealed that the wreckage debris was scattered throughout a neighborhood area about 1,000 ft long and 800 ft wide on a south-to-north orientation. At the far south parameter of the debris field were tail sections. The far north area contained the left engine, and left propeller and the fuselage. About 700 ft north-east from the first recovered piece of debris, the right engine and the right propeller impacted an asphalt road, and came to rest in a nearby front yard. The left wing was found about 716 ft north of the first recovered piece of debris, about 140 ft south-west of a burned house. Within the house, fragments of the outboard right wing (which also contained the fuel tank) were located. The fuselage with the attached right inboard wing, along with the left propeller and left engine were located about 310 ft downhill from the burned house on a heading of 310°. The wreckage was recovered and moved to a secure location for future examination.

Crash of a Boeing 707-3J9C in Fath: 15 killed

Date & Time: Jan 14, 2019 at 0830 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EP-CPP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Bishkek - Payam
MSN:
21128/917
YOM:
1976
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
16
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
15
Circumstances:
The airplane, owned by the Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force (IRIAF) was completing a cargo flight from Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, on behalf of Saha Airlines, and was supposed to land at Payam Airport located southwest of Karaj, carrying a load of meat. On approach, the crew encountered marginal weather conditions and the pilot mistakenly landed on runway 31L at Fath Airport instead of runway 30 at Payam Airport which is located 10 km northwest. After touchdown, control was lost and the airplane was unable to stop within the remaining distance (runway 31L is 1,140 meters long), overran and crashed in flames into several houses located past the runway end. The aircraft was destroyed by fire as well as few houses. The flight engineer was evacuated while 15 other occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 525 CitationJet CJ1 in Payson: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 13, 2018 at 0230 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N526CP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
525-0099
YOM:
1995
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Owned by a construction company and registered under Vancon Holdings LLC (VanCon Inc.), the aircraft was parked at Spanish Fork-Springville Airport when it was stolen at night by a private pilot. After takeoff, hew flew southbound to Payson, reduced his altitude and voluntarily crashed the plane onto his house located in Payson. The airplane disintegrated on impact and was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire. The pilot was killed. His wife and daughter who were in the house at the time of the accident were uninjured despite the house was also destroyed by fire. Local Police declared that the pilot intentionally flew the airplane into his own home hours after being booked for domestic assault charges.

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in Santa Ana: 5 killed

Date & Time: Aug 5, 2018 at 1228 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N727RP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Concord – Santa Ana
MSN:
414-0385
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
While approaching Santa Ana-John Wayne Airport in excellent weather conditions, the twin engine aircraft entered a dive and crashed in a vertical attitude in the parking lot of a commercial mall located in Bristol Street, about 1,7 mile northwest of the airport. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and there was no fire. At least one vehicle on the ground was destroyed. All five occupants were killed while no one on the ground was injured.

Crash of a Beechcraft C90A King Air in Mumbai: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jun 28, 2018 at 1315 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VT-UPZ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Juhu - Juhu
MSN:
LJ-1400
YOM:
1995
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
Following technical maintenance, a test flight was scheduled with two engineers and two pilots. The twin engine airplane departed Mumbai-Juhu Airport and the crew completed several manoeuvres over the city before returning. On approach in heavy rain falls, the aircraft went out of control and crashed in flames at the bottom of a building under construction located in the Ghatkopar West district, some 3 km east from Mumbai Intl Airport. The aircraft was completely destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all four occupants were killed as well as one person on the ground.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-310P Malibu in Prescott

Date & Time: May 29, 2018 at 2115 LT
Registration:
N148ME
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Santa Ana – Prescott
MSN:
46-8608009
YOM:
1986
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3100
Captain / Total hours on type:
3.00
Circumstances:
According to the pilot, about 15 minutes before reaching the destination airport during descent, the engine lost power. The pilot switched fuel tanks, and the engine power was momentarily restored, but the engine stopped producing power even though he thought it "was still running all the way to impact." The pilot conducted a forced landed on a highway at night, and the right wing struck an object and separated from the airplane. The airplane came to rest inverted. According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector (ASI) that performed the postaccident airplane examination, the fuel lines to the fuel manifold were dry, and the fuel manifold valves were dry. He reported that the fuel strainer, the diaphragm, and the fuel filter in the duel manifold were unremarkable. Fuel was found in the gascolator. The FAA ASI reported that, during his interview with the pilot, "the pilot changed his story from fuel exhaustion, to fuel contamination." The inspector reported that there were no signs of fuel contamination during the examination of the fuel system. According to the fixed-base operator (FBO) at the departure airport, the pilot requested 20 gallons of fuel. He then canceled his fuel request and walked out of the FBO.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper fuel planning, which resulted in fuel exhaustion and the subsequent total loss of engine power.
Final Report:

Crash of a PZL-Mielec AN-2 in Ekimchan: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 7, 2017 at 0825 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RA-02305
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Ekimchan - Udskoye
MSN:
1G240-07
YOM:
1990
Flight number:
SHA9001
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Ekimchan Airport, the single engine aircraft struck trees and crashed in flames in a wooded and snow covered area located near few houses. One of the pilots was killed while the second occupant was injured. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire. According to preliminary report, the loss of control was caused by an engine failure during initial climb.

Crash of a Cessna 402B in St Petersburg

Date & Time: Oct 18, 2017 at 1545 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N900CR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Miami - Tallahassee
MSN:
402B-1356
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
En route from Opa Locka to Tallahassee, the pilot encountered an unexpected situation and apparently decided to divert to St Petersburg-Albert Whitted Airport. Eventually, he attempted an emergency landing when the airplane struck an electric pole and crashed on two occupied vehicles before coming to rest onto the intersection of 18th Avenue South and 16th Street South in St. Petersburg, about 1,5 mile from runway 07 threshold. The pilot and four peoples in the cars were injured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.