Country

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Hawk Junction: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 11, 2019 at 0900 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FBBG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Hawk Junction - Oba Lake
MSN:
358
YOM:
1952
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft departed Hawk Air seaplane base on Hawk Lake near Hawk Junction on a positioning flight to Oba Lake, carrying two Hawk Air's employees, a pilot and a co-worker. Shortly after takeoff, the floatplane crashed near a power substation and was destroyed. Both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan near Pickle Lake: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 11, 2015 at 0910 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FKDL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Pickle Lake – Angling Lake
MSN:
208B-0240
YOM:
1990
Flight number:
WSG127
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The pilot, sole on board, left Pickle Lake Airport at 0900LT bound for Angling Lake (Wapekeka) Airstrip with various goods on board. Radio contact was lost enroute and as the aircraft failed to arrive, SAR operations were initiated. The wreckage was spotted in a remote area at 1315LT and the first rescuers arrived on site at 2250LT. The pilot was killed.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver near Kennedy Lake

Date & Time: Jun 25, 2014 at 1425 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FHVT
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Sudbury - Kennedy Lake
MSN:
284
YOM:
1952
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3500
Captain / Total hours on type:
1000.00
Circumstances:
The Sudbury Aviation Limited float-equipped de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver aircraft (registration C-FHVT, serial number 284) was on approach to Kennedy Lake, Ontario, with the pilot and 2 passengers on board, when the aircraft rolled to the left prior to the flare. The pilot attempted to regain control of the aircraft by applying full right rudder and right aileron. The attempt was unsuccessful and the aircraft struck rising tree-covered terrain above the shoreline. The aircraft came to a stop on its right side and on a slope. The pilot and the passenger in the rear seat received minor injuries. The passenger in the right front seat was not injured. All were able to walk to the company fishing camp on the lake. There was no fire and the 406 megahertz emergency locator transmitter (ELT) was manually activated by one of the passengers. One of the operator's other aircraft, a Cessna 185, flew to the lake after C-FHVT became overdue. A search and rescue aircraft, responding to the ELT, also located the accident site. Radio contact between the Cessna 185 and the search and rescue aircraft confirmed that their assistance would not be required. The accident occurred at 1425 Eastern Daylight Time.
Probable cause:
Prior to touchdown in a northerly direction, the aircraft encountered a gusty westerly crosswind and the associated turbulence. This initiated an un-commanded yaw and left wing drop indicating an aerodynamic stall. The pilot was unsuccessful in recovering full control of the aircraft and it impacted rising terrain on the shore approximately 30 feet above the water surface.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA227AC Metro III in Red Lake: 5 killed

Date & Time: Nov 10, 2013 at 1834 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FFZN
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Sioux Lookout - Red Lake
MSN:
AC-785B
YOM:
1991
Flight number:
BLS311
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
5150
Captain / Total hours on type:
3550.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2200
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1060
Aircraft flight hours:
35474
Circumstances:
Flight from Sioux Lookout was uneventful till the final descent to Red Lake completed by night and in light snow with a ceiling at 2,000 feet and visibility 8 SM. On final approach to runway 26, crew reported south of the airport and declared an emergency. Shortly after this mayday message, aircraft hit power cables and crashed in flames in a dense wooded area located 800 meters south of the airport. Two passengers seating in the rear were seriously injured while all five other occupants including both pilots were killed.
Probable cause:
A first-stage turbine wheel blade in the left engine failed due to a combination of metallurgical issues and stator vane burn-through. As a result of the blade failure, the left engine continued to operate but experienced a near-total loss of power at approximately 500 feet above ground level, on final approach to Runway 26 at the Red Lake Airport. The crew were unable to identify the nature of the engine malfunction, which prevented them from taking timely and appropriate action to control the aircraft. The nature of the engine malfunction resulted in the left propeller being at a very low blade angle, which, together with the landing configuration of the aircraft, resulted in the aircraft being in an increasingly high drag and asymmetric state. When the aircraft’s speed reduced below minimum control speed (VMC), the crew lost control at an altitude from which a recovery was not possible.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft D18S off Red Lake: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 30, 2013 at 1727 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-FWWV
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Red Lake - Red Lake
MSN:
CA-18
YOM:
1951
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The pilot and his wife, a couple from Phoenix, were performing a flight from Red Lake harbor to a tourist camp located to the north of the city of Red Lake. Twin engine aircraft took off at 1727LT in marginal weather conditions: wind and rain. Shortly after departure, aircraft crashed into the Bruce Channel located between Cochenour and McKenzie Island. Aircraft sank and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Socata TBM-850 in Ontario: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 8, 2012 at 1215 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FBKK
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Carp - Goderich
MSN:
621
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
26000
Circumstances:
Aircraft left Carp Airport (about 20 km east of Ottawa) around noon bound to Goderich, southwest of Ontario Province. While cruising at 27,000 feet, pilot informed ATC about technical issues. Moment later, single engine aircraft went out of control, dove into the ground and crashed in a wooded area. Pilot was killed and aircraft disintegrated on impact.

Ground fire of an Avro 748 in Sandy Lake

Date & Time: Jun 12, 2012 at 1343 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FTTW
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Pickle Lake – Sandy Lake
MSN:
1681
YOM:
21
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft was parked on the ramp at Sandy Lake Airport. The flight crew had disembarked and were off-loading the cargo (JET A-1 jet fuel) from the aircraft to fuel tanks adjacent to the ramp. A fire broke out and the flight crew used the available fire extinguishers but the fire spread and consumed most of the aircraft, which was destroyed. There were no injuries.
Probable cause:
A leak occurred in a hose downstream of the pumps (located on the ground beside the aircraft). The ambient wind blew vapors toward the pumps and a fire broke out.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Lillabelle Lake: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 25, 2012 at 1408 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FGBF
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Edgar Lake - Lillabelle Lake
MSN:
168
YOM:
1952
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1100
Captain / Total hours on type:
300.00
Aircraft flight hours:
22000
Circumstances:
The Cochrane Air Service de Havilland DHC-2 Mk.1 Beaver floatplane (registration C-FGBF, serial number 168) departed Edgar Lake, Ontario, with 2 passengers and 300 pounds of cargo on board. The aircraft was destined for the company’s main base located on Lillabelle Lake, Ontario, approximately 77 miles to the south. On arrival, a southwest-bound landing was attempted across the narrow width of the lake, as the winds favoured this direction. The pilot was unable to land the aircraft in the distance available and executed a go-around. At 1408, Eastern Daylight Time, shortly after full power application, the aircraft rolled quickly to the left and struck the water in a partially inverted attitude. The aircraft came to rest on the muddy lake bottom, partially suspended by the undamaged floats. The passenger in the front seat was able to exit the aircraft and was subsequently rescued. The pilot and rear-seat passenger were not able to exit and drowned. The emergency locator transmitter activated on impact.
Probable cause:
The investigation determined that the aircraft was maintained in accordance with existing rules and regulations, and that the company was operating within the rules and guidelines laid out in the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) and the company operations manual. The analysis will therefore focus on the pilot, on the particular circumstances that led to the aircraft impacting the water, and on the underlying systemic safety issues within the floatplane industry. The wind at the time of the occurrence was very strong and gusty. While these conditions were known to the pilot, changes in wind speed and direction, as well as the mechanical turbulence caused by the wind’s passage over obstacles on the windward side of the approach, would have made for challenging landing conditions. There likely was an increase in headwind, which in turn increased the float time of the aircraft while in the landing flare. As the available landing distance was used up in this landing flare, the pilot decided to conduct a missed approach, applied power, and increased the aircraft angle of attack. It is possible that the pilot inadvertently allowed the aircraft speed to bleed off, or perhaps a change in the headwind component due to the gusty winds (wind shear) resulted in a sudden drop in airspeed below the stall speed. The rapid application of full power caused the aircraft to yaw to the left, and a left roll quickly developed. This movement, in combination with a high angle of attack and low airspeed, likely caused the aircraft to stall. The altitude available to regain control before striking the water was insufficient. The aircraft was not equipped with a stall warning system, which may have given the pilot additional warning of an impending stall.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in North Spirit Lake: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jan 10, 2012 at 0957 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-GOSU
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Winnipeg - North Spirit Lake
MSN:
31-7752148
YOM:
1977
Flight number:
KEE213
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
2400
Captain / Total hours on type:
95.00
Circumstances:
The Piper PA31-350 Navajo Chieftain (registration C-GOSU, serial number 31-7752148), operating as Keystone Air Service Limited Flight 213, departed Winnipeg/James Armstrong Richardson International Airport, Manitoba, enroute to North Spirit Lake, Ontario, with 1 pilot and 4 passengers on board. At 0957 Central Standard Time, on approach to Runway 13 at North Spirit Lake, the aircraft struck the frozen lake surface 1.1 nautical miles from the threshold of Runway 13. The pilot and 3 passengers sustained fatal injuries. One passenger sustained serious injuries. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post-impact fire. After a short period of operation, the emergency locator transmitter stopped transmitting when the antenna wire was consumed by the fire.
Probable cause:
Findings as to causes and contributing factors:
1. The pilot's decision to conduct an approach to an aerodrome not serviced by an instrument flight rules approach in adverse weather conditions was likely the result of the pilot's inexperience, and may have been influenced by the pilot's desire to successfully complete the flight.
2. The pilot's decision to descend into cloud and continue in icing conditions was likely the result of inadequate awareness of the Piper PA31-350 aircraft's performance in icing conditions and of its de-icing capabilities.
3. While waiting for the runway to be cleared of snow, the aircraft held near North Spirit Lake (CKQ3) in icing conditions. The resulting ice accumulation on the aircraft's critical surfaces would have led to an increase in the aircraft's aerodynamic drag and stall speed, causing the aircraft to stall during final approach at an altitude from which recovery was not possible.
Findings as to risk:
1. Terminology contained in aircraft flight manuals and regulatory material regarding “known icing conditions,” “light to moderate icing conditions,” “flight in,” and “flight into” is inconsistent, and this inconsistency increases the risk of confusion as to the aircraft’s certification and capability in icing conditions.
2. If confusion and uncertainty exist as to the aircraft’s certification and capability in icing conditions, then there is increased risk that flights will dispatch into icing conditions that exceed the capability of the aircraft.
3. The lack of procedures and tools to assist pilots in the decision to self-dispatch leaves them at increased risk of dispatching into conditions beyond the capability of the aircraft.
4. When management involvement in the dispatch process results in pilots feeling pressure to complete flights in challenging conditions, there is increased risk that pilots may attempt flights beyond their competence.
5. Under current regulations, Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) 703 and 704 operators are not required to provide training in crew resource management / pilot decision-making or threat- and error-management. A breakdown in crew resource management / pilot decision-making may result in an increased risk when pilots are faced with adverse weather conditions.
6. Descending below the area minimum altitude while in instrument meteorological conditions without a published approach procedure increases the risk of collision with terrain.
7. If onboard flight recorders are not available to an investigation, this unavailability may preclude the identification and communication of safety deficiencies to advance transportation safety.
Final Report:

Crash of an Embraer ERJ-145LR in Ottawa

Date & Time: Sep 4, 2011 at 1535 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N840HK
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chicago - Ottawa
MSN:
145-341
YOM:
2001
Flight number:
UA3363
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
44
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful flight from Chicago-O'Hare, crew started the descent to Ottawa-MacDonald-Cartier Airport, Ontario, in poor weather conditions. Aircraft landed on the wet runway 32 and after a course of 8,200 feet, aircraft veered off runway to the left. While penetrating in a soft ground, both main gear were partially sheared off and aircraft came to rest. All 47 occupants were evacuated safely and the aircraft was declared as write off. At the time of the accident, weather conditions were as follow: wind from 300 at 10 knots, visibility one-half of a mile, heavy rain showers, sky overcast with a ceiling at 3,000 feet with towering cumulus clouds.