Crash of a Beechcraft A100 King Air in Charallave: 9 killed

Date & Time: Dec 19, 2019
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
YV1104
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Guasipati – Charallave
MSN:
B-231
YOM:
1977
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
On final approach to Charallave-Óscar Machado Zuloaga Airport in marginal weather conditions, the twin engine airplane crashed in unknown circumstances about 8 km from the runway threshold. The aircraft was destroyed and all nine occupants were killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft B100 King Air in Abbotsford

Date & Time: Feb 23, 2018 at 1204 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GIAE
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Abbotsford - San Bernardino
MSN:
BE-8
YOM:
1976
Flight number:
IAX640
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
10000
Captain / Total hours on type:
800.00
Aircraft flight hours:
10580
Circumstances:
Weather conditions at Abbotsford at the time of departure consisted of a temperature of -2°C in moderate to heavy snowfall with winds of approximately 10 knots. Prior to the departure, the fuel tanks were filled to capacity and the pilot and passengers boarded the aircraft inside the operator's heated hangar. The aircraft was towed outside of the hangar without being treated with anti-ice fluid, and taxied for the departure on runway 07. Due to an inbound arrival at Abbotsford, C-GIAE was delayed for departure. Once cleared for takeoff, the aircraft had been exposed to snow and freezing conditions for approximately 14 minutes. After becoming airborne, the aircraft experienced power and control issues shortly after the landing gear was retracted. The aircraft collided with terrain within the airport perimeter. Four passengers and the pilot sustained serious injuries as a result of the accident which destroyed the aircraft.
Probable cause:
The accident was the consequence of the combination of the following findings:
- The occurrence aircraft exited a warm hangar and was exposed to 14 minutes of heavy snow in below-freezing conditions. This resulted in a condition highly conducive to severe ground icing,
- As the aircraft climbed out of ground effect on takeoff, it experienced an aerodynamic stall as a result of wing contamination,
- The pilot’s decision making was affected by continuation bias, which resulted in the pilot attempting a takeoff with an aircraft contaminated with ice and snow adhering to its critical surfaces,
- The pilot and the passenger seated in the right-hand crew seat were not wearing the available shoulder harnesses. As a result, they sustained serious head injuries during the impact sequence,
- During the impact sequence, the cargo restraint system used to secure the baggage in the rear baggage compartment failed, causing some of the baggage to injure passengers seated in the rear of the aircraft cabin,
- The aircraft was not airworthy at the time of the occurrence as a result of an incomplete airworthiness directive.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B100 King Air in Pearland: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 19, 2014 at 0845 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N811BL
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Austin – Galveston
MSN:
BE-15
YOM:
1976
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1281
Captain / Total hours on type:
192.00
Circumstances:
The non-instrument-rated pilot departed on a cross-country flight in a twin-engine turboprop airplane on an instrument flight plan. As the pilot neared his destination airport, he received heading and altitude vectors from air traffic control. The controller cleared the flight for the approach to the airport; shortly afterward, the pilot radioed that he was executing a missed approach. The controller then issued missed approach instructions, which the pilot acknowledged. There was no further communication with the pilot. The airplane collided with terrain in a near-vertical angle. About the time of the accident, the automated weather reporting station recorded a 300-foot overcast ceiling, and 5 miles visibility in mist. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Additionally, both engines displayed signatures consistent with the production of power at the time of impact. The pilot's logbook indicated that he had a total of 1,281.6 flight hours, with 512.4 in multi-engine airplanes and 192.9 in the accident airplane. The logbook also revealed that he had 29.7 total hours of actual instrument time, with 15.6 of those hours in the accident airplane. Of the total instrument time, he received 1 hour of instrument instruction by a flight instructor, recorded about 3 years before the accident. The accident is consistent with a loss of control in instrument conditions.
Probable cause:
The noninstrument-rated pilot's loss of airplane control during a missed instrument approach. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's decision to file an instrument flight rules flight plan and to fly into known instrument meteorological conditions.
Final Report: