code

GA

Crash of a Cessna 560 Citation V in Atlanta: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 20, 2018 at 1211 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N188CW
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Atlanta - Millington
MSN:
560-0148
YOM:
1991
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
Less than a minute after takeoff from runway 08 at Atlanta-Fulton County-Brown Field Airport, the crew was instructed to turn heading 310° when the airplane went out of control and crashed in a sports field. Upon impact, the aircraft partially disintegrated before it came to rest in flames in a wooded area in English Park, about 1,3 mile northeast of the airport. The aircraft was destroyed and all four occupants have been killed.

Crash of a Lockheed HC-130H Hercules in Savannah: 9 killed

Date & Time: May 2, 2018 at 1130 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
65-0968
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Savannah – Davis-Monthan
MSN:
4110
YOM:
1965
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
After takeoff from runway 10 at Savannah-Hilton Head Airport, while in initial climb, the four engine airplane went out of control, entered a dive and crashed in a huge explosion on road 21 located about a mile east of the airport. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and all nine occupants were killed, all members of the contingent of the Puerto Rico Air National Guard (ANG). The aircraft, built in 1965, was on its way to Davis-Monthan AFB to be retired. This was its last flight.

Crash of a Cessna 500 Citation I in Marietta: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 24, 2017 at 1924 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N8DX
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Cincinnati – Atlanta
MSN:
500-0303
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
6000
Aircraft flight hours:
9299
Circumstances:
The private pilot departed on an instrument flight rules flight plan in his twin-engine turbojet airplane. The flight was uneventful until the air traffic controller amended the flight plan, which required the pilot to manually enter the new routing information into the GPS. A few minutes later, the pilot told the controller that he was having problems with the GPS and asked for a direct route to his destination. The controller authorized the direct route and instructed the pilot to descend from 22,000 ft to 6,000 ft, during which time the sound of the autopilot disconnect was heard on the cockpit voice recorder (CVR). During the descent, the pilot told the controller that the airplane had a steering problem and was in the clouds. The pilot was instructed to descend the airplane to 4,100 ft, which was the minimum vectoring altitude. The airplane continued to descend, entered visual meteorological conditions, and then descended below the assigned altitude. The controller queried the pilot about the airplane's low altitude and instructed the pilot to maintain 4,100 ft. The pilot responded that he was unsure if he would be able to climb the airplane back to that altitude due to steering issues. The controller issued a low altitude warning and again advised the pilot to climb back to 4,100 ft. The pilot responded that the autopilot was working again and that he was able to climb the airplane to the assigned altitude. The controller then instructed the pilot to change to another radio frequency, but the pilot responded that he was still having a problem with the GPS. The pilot asked the controller to give him direct routing to the airport. A few minutes later, the pilot told the controller that he was barely able to keep the airplane straight and its wings level. The controller asked the pilot if he had the airport in sight, which he did not. The pilot then declared an emergency and expressed concerns related to identifying the landing runway. Afterward, radio contact between the controller and the pilot was lost. Shortly before the airplane impacted the ground, a witness saw the airplane make a complete 360° roll to the left, enter a steep 90° bank to the left, roll inverted, and enter a vertical nose-down dive. Another witness saw the airplane spiral to the ground. The airplane impacted the front lawn of a private residence, and a postcrash fire ensued.The pilot held a type rating for the airplane, but the pilot's personal logbooks were not available for review. As a result, his overall currency and total flight experience in the accident airplane could not be determined. The airplane was originally certified for operations with a pilot and copilot. To obtain an exemption to operate the airplane as a single pilot, a pilot must successfully complete an approved single-pilot exemption training course annually. The accident airplane was modified, and the previous owner was issued a single-pilot conformity certificate by the company that performed the modifications. However, there was no record indicating that the accident pilot received training under this exemption. Several facilities that have single-pilot exemption training for the accident airplane series also had no record of the pilot receiving training for single-pilot operations in the accident airplane. Therefore, unlikely that the pilot was properly certificated to act as a single-pilot. The GPS was installed in the airplane about 3.5 years before the accident. A friend of the pilot trained him on how to use the GPS. The friend said that the pilot generally was confused about how the unit operated and struggled with pulling up pages and correlating data. The friend of the pilot had flown with him several times and indicated that, if an air traffic controller amended a preprogrammed flight plan while en route, the pilot would be confused with the procedure for amending the flight plan. The friend also said the pilot depended heavily on the autopilot, which was integrated with the GPS, and that he would activate the autopilot immediately after takeoff and deactivate it on short final approach to a runway. The pilot would not trim the airplane before turning on the autopilot because he assumed that the autopilot would automatically trim the airplane, which led to the autopilot working against the mis-trimmed airplane. The friend added that the pilot was "constantly complaining" that the airplane was "uncontrollable." A postaccident examination of the airplane and the autopilot system revealed no evidence of any preimpact deficiencies that would have precluded normal operation. This information suggests that pilot historically had difficulty flying the airplane without the aid of the autopilot. When coupled with his performance flying the airplane during the accident flight without the aid of the autopilot, it further suggests that the pilot was consistently unable to manually fly the airplane. Additionally, given the pilot's previous experience with the GPS installed on the airplane, it is likely that during the accident flight the pilot became confused about how to operate the GPS and ultimately was unable to properly control of the airplane without the autopilot engaged. Based on witness information, it is likely that during the final moments of the flight the pilot lost control of the airplane and it entered an aerodynamic stall. The pilot was then unable to regain control of the airplane as it spun 4,000 ft to the ground.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed while manually flying the airplane, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's inability control the airplane without the aid of the autopilot.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Cherokee County: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 4, 2017 at 0010 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N421KL
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
421B-0015
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Aircraft flight hours:
7522
Circumstances:
On March 4, 2017, about 0023 eastern standard time, a Cessna 421B, N421KL, was substantially damaged during an attempted go-around and subsequent collision with terrain at Cherokee County Airport (CNI), Canton, Georgia. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and was being operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal cross-country flight. The flight originated about 1930 on March 3, 2017, from Richard Lloyd Jones Jr Airport (RVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma, and was destined for CNI. According to personnel at an aviation brokerage company in Oklahoma, the pilot purchased the airplane on March 2, 2017. A flight instructor reported that he and the pilot flew the airplane on March 1, 2017, for 1.5 hours to go over the various systems of the Cessna 421B. On March 2, 2017, the flight instructor flew with the pilot again for 45 minutes conducting pattern work. The flight instructor said that the pilot told him that he had previously owned two Cessna 421Cs, was a little "rusty," and had not flown that type of airplane since 1984. The instructor reported that, overall, the pilot was knowledgeable of the operation of airplane. He also reported that the pilot departed with enough fuel for the cross-country flight. A review of the pilot's logbook revealed that the flight instructor signed off a flight review on March 3, 2017. Radar and audio data obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot was in contact with air traffic control and receiving visual flight rules (VFR) flight following services while inbound to CNI. The pilot cancelled flight following when he had the airport in sight. Radar data continued to show the airplane on approach to CNI until 2,500 ft when the airplane descended below radar coverage. A review of airport video surveillance footage revealed that the runway lights were illuminated during the airplane's approach to runway 05. The airplane's landing lights became visible as the airplane neared the runway. On short final, the airplane pitched up and rolled to the right. The airplane then descended in a nose-down attitude into a ravine on the right side of the runway. The video footage stopped for a second, and then a fire was seen in the ravine. Witnesses observed the airplane flying extremely low before noticing a "ball of fire" erupt near the airport.

Crash of a Swearingen SA227AC Metro III near Pebble City: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 5, 2016 at 2222 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N765FA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Panama City – Albany
MSN:
AC-765
YOM:
1990
Flight number:
LYM308
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
8451
Captain / Total hours on type:
4670.00
Aircraft flight hours:
24233
Circumstances:
The airline transport pilot delayed his scheduled departure for the night cargo flight due to thunderstorms along the route. Before departing, the pilot explained to the flight follower assigned to the flight that if he could not get though the thunderstorms along the planned route, he would divert to the alternate airport. While en route, the pilot was advised by the air traffic controller in contact with the flight of a "ragged line of moderate, heavy, and extreme" precipitation along his planned route. The controller also stated that he did not see any breaks in the weather. The controller cleared the pilot to descend at his discretion from 7,000 ft mean sea level (msl) to 3,000 ft msl, and subsequently, the controller suggested a diversion to the northeast for about 70 nautical miles that would avoid the most severe weather. The pilot responded that he had enough fuel for such a diversion but concluded that he would "see what the radar is painting" after descending to 3,000 ft msl. About 1 minute 30 seconds later, as the airplane was descending through 7,000 ft msl, the controller stated, "I just lost you on radar, I don't show a transponder, it might have to do with the weather." About 40 seconds later, the pilot advised the controller that he intended to deviate to the right of course, and the controller told the pilot that he could turn left and right as needed. Shortly thereafter, the pilot stated that he was going to turn around and proceed to his alternate airport. The controller cleared the pilot direct to his alternate and instructed him to maintain 3,000 ft msl. The pilot acknowledged the instruction, and the controller then stated, "do you want to climb back up? I can offer you any altitude." The pilot responded that he would try to climb back to 3,000 ft msl. The controller then recommended a heading of 180° to "get you clear of the weather quicker," and the pilot responded, "alright 180." There were no further communications from the pilot. Shortly thereafter, radar data showed the airplane enter a right turn that continued through about 540°. During the turn its airspeed varied between 198 and 130 knots, while its estimated bank angles were between 40 and 50°. Examination of the wreckage indicated that airplane experienced an in-flight breakup at relatively low altitude, consistent with radar data that showed the airplane's last recorded altitudes to be around 3,500 ft msl. The symmetrical nature of the breakup, damage to the outboard wings, and damage to the upper fuselage were all signatures indicative that the left and right wings failed in positive overload almost simultaneously. All of the fracture surfaces examined had a dull, grainy appearance consistent with overstress separation. There was no evidence of pre-existing cracking noted at any of the separation points, nor was there evidence of any mechanical anomalies that would have prevented normal operation. Review of base reflectivity weather radar data showed that, while the pilot was maneuvering to divert to the alternate airport, the airplane was operating in an area of light precipitation that rapidly intensified to heavy precipitation, as shown by radar scans completed shortly after the accident. During this time, the flight was likely operating in clouds along the leading edge of the convective line, where the pilot most likely would have encountered updrafts and severe or greater turbulence. The low visibility conditions that existed during the flight, which was conducted at night and in instrument meteorological conditions, coupled with the turbulence the flight likely encountered, were conducive to the development of spatial disorientation. Additionally, the airplane's maneuvering during the final moments of the flight was consistent with a loss of control due to spatial disorientation. The pilot's continued flight into known convective weather conditions and his delayed decision to divert the flight directly contributed to the accident. Although the operator had a system safety-based program, the responsibility for the safe outcome of the flight was left solely to the pilot. Written company policy required completion of a flight risk assessment tool (FRAT) before each flight by the assigned flight follower; however, a FRAT was not completed for the accident flight. The flight followers responsible for completing the FRATs were not trained to complete them for night cargo flights, and the operator's management was not aware that the FRATs were not being completed for night cargo flights. Further, if a FRAT had been completed for the accident flight, the resultant score would have allowed the flight to commence into known hazardous weather conditions without any further review. If greater oversight had been provided by the operator, it is possible that the flight may have been cancelled or re-routed due to the severity of the convective weather conditions present along the planned route of flight.
Probable cause:
The pilot's decision to initiate and continue the flight into known adverse weather conditions, which resulted spatial disorientation, a loss of airplane control, and a subsequent in-flight breakup.
Final Report:

Ground accident of a Pilatus PC-12/47E in Savannah

Date & Time: Jan 6, 2016 at 0836 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N978AF
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Savannah - Lexington
MSN:
1078
YOM:
2008
Flight number:
Cobalt Air 727
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While taxiing to runway 01 at Savannah-Hilton Head Airport on a flight to Lexington-Blue Grass, the aircraft went out of control, veered off the taxiway and came to rest in flames into a ditch. Both occupants were rescued and evacuated while the fire was quickly extinguished. However, the aircraft was written off.

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II in Climax: 2 killed

Date & Time: Nov 9, 2015 at 1001 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N164GP
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Lakeland - Cairo
MSN:
441-0164
YOM:
1980
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
While descending to Cairo-Grady Airport and flying at an altitude of 2,000 feet, the twin engine aircraft crashed in a dense wooded area located in Climax. The wreckage was spotted few hours later, both occupants have been killed.

Crash of a Raytheon 390 Premier I in Atlanta: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 17, 2013 at 1925 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N50PM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Atlanta - New Orleans
MSN:
RB-80
YOM:
2003
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Atlanta-Fulton County-Brown Field Airport, bound to New Orleans-Lakefront Airport, while in initial climb, pilot informed ATC he was encountering problems and elected to return. He did not request emergency equipment and started a descent to runway 26 when aircraft went out of control and crashed in a huge explosion in a wooded area located 6 km northwest of the airport. Both occupants were killed, among them the CEO of Mallen Industries, Peter J. Mallen.

Crash of a Raytheon 390 Premier I in Thomson: 5 killed

Date & Time: Feb 20, 2013 at 2006 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N777VG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nashville - Thomson
MSN:
RB-208
YOM:
2007
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
13319
Captain / Total hours on type:
198.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2952
Copilot / Total hours on type:
45
Circumstances:
Aircraft was destroyed following a collision with a utility pole, trees, and terrain following a go-around at Thomson-McDuffie Regional Airport (HQU), Thomson, Georgia. The airline transport-rated pilot and copilot were seriously injured, and five passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to the Pavilion Group LLC and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated at John C. Tune Airport (JWN), Nashville, Tennessee, about 1828 central standard time (1928 eastern standard time). The purpose of the flight was to transport staff members of a vascular surgery practice from Nashville to Thomson, where the airplane was based. According to initial air traffic control information, the pilot checked in with Augusta approach control and reported HQU in sight. About 2003, the pilot cancelled visual flight rules flight-following services and continued toward HQU. The last recorded radar return was observed about 2005, when the airplane was at an indicated altitude of 700 feet above mean sea level and 1/2 mile from the airport. There were no distress calls received from the crew prior to the accident. Witnesses reported that the airplane appeared to be in position to land when the pilot discontinued the approach and commenced a go-around. The witnesses observed the airplane continue down the runway at a low altitude. The airplane struck a poured-concrete utility pole and braided wires about 59 feet above ground level. The pole was located about 1/4 mile east the departure end of runway 10. The utility pole was not lighted. During the initial impact with the utility pole, the outboard section of the left wing was severed. The airplane continued another 1/4 mile east before colliding with trees and terrain. A postcrash fire ensued and consumed a majority of the airframe. The engines separated from the fuselage during the impact sequence. On-scene examination of the wreckage revealed that all primary airframe structural components were accounted for at the accident site. The landing gear were found in the down (extended) position, and the flap handle was found in the 10-degree (go-around) position. An initial inspection of the airport revealed that the pilot-controlled runway lights were operational. An examination of conditions recorded on an airport security camera showed that the runway lights were on the low intensity setting at the time of the accident. The airport did not have a control tower. An inspection of the runway surface did not reveal any unusual tire marks or debris. Weather conditions at HQU near the time of the accident included calm wind and clear skies.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to follow airplane flight manual procedures for an antiskid failure in flight and his failure to immediately retract the lift dump after he elected to attempt a go-around on the runway. Contributing to the accident were the pilot's lack of systems knowledge and his fatigue due to acute sleep loss and his ineffective use of time between flights to obtain sleep.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft Beechjet 400A in Macon

Date & Time: Sep 18, 2012 at 1003 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N428JD
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Charleston - Macon
MSN:
RJ-13
YOM:
1986
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On September 18, 2012, about 1003 eastern daylight time, a Beech 400, N428JD, was substantially damaged when it overran runway 28 during landing at Macon Downtown Airport (MAC), Macon, Georgia. The airplane had departed from Charleston Air Force Base/International Airport (CHS), Charleston, South Carolina about 0930. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed. Both Airline Transport Pilots and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The corporate flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. According to an interview with the pilots, during the approach the calculated speed was 108 knots. They reported the airport in sight to Macon Air Traffic Control (ATC) Approach Radar Control and canceled the IFR flight plan. The landing was within the first 1,000 feet of the runway and there was water visible on the runway. Maximum reverse thrust, braking, and ground spoilers were deployed; however, both pilots reported a "pulsation" in the brake system. The airplane departed the end of the runway, traveled into the grass, went down an embankment, across the road, and into the trees. They further added that the airplane "hit hard" at the bottom of the embankment. Examination of the paved portion of the landing runway revealed that beginning approximately 1,000 feet from the departure end of the runway, evidence of tire tracks were visible. The tire tracks were observed veering to the left of the centerline and then veering to the right of centerline. Subsequently, the tracks exited the end of the runway into the grass, traveled to the crest of, and subsequently down an approximate 25-foot embankment, traveled across a two-lane paved highway, through some brush prior to coming to a rest. The airplane came to rest upright and at the base of a tree 283 feet from the paved portion of the runway and on a heading of 292 degrees. The cockpit voice recorder, Garmin 500 global positioning unit, Power Brake Valve, Antiskid unit, both wheel speed transducers, brake units, and hydraulic valve package, were retained by the NTSB for further examination.