Zone

Crash of an Airbus A320-232 into the Mediterranean Sea: 66 killed

Date & Time: May 19, 2016 at 0237 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SU-GCC
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Paris – Cairo
MSN:
2088
YOM:
25
Flight number:
MS804
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
10
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
56
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
66
Captain / Total flying hours:
6275
Captain / Total hours on type:
2101.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2675
Aircraft flight hours:
48000
Circumstances:
The aircraft left Paris-Roissy-Charles de Gaulle Airport at 2321LT on May 18 bound for Cairo. The crew maintained radio contacts with the Greek ATC and was transferred to the Egyptian ATC but failed to respond. Two minutes after the airplane left the Greek airspace, the aircraft fell from FL370 to FL220 in few seconds, apparently making a first turn to the left and then a 360 turn to the right before disappearing from the radar screen at 0237LT while at an altitude of 10'000 feet. It is believed the aircraft crashed into the Mediterranean sea about 280 km northwest of Alexandria, halfway between the Greek island of Crete and the Egyptian coast. The crew did not send any mayday message, thereby all assumptions remains open. It appears that some various debris such as luggage were found on May 20 about 290-300 km north of Alexandria. Two days after the accident, it is confirmed that ACARS messages reported smoke on board, apparently in the lavatory and also in a technical compartment located under the cockpit. Above that, several technical issues were reported by the ACARS system. The CVR has been recovered on June 16, 2016, and the DFDR a day later. As both recorder systems are badly damaged, they will need to be repaired before analyzing any datas.

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II in Climax: 2 killed

Date & Time: Nov 9, 2015 at 1016 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N164GP
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Lakeland - Cairo
MSN:
441-0164
YOM:
1980
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1150
Captain / Total hours on type:
150.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
9500
Aircraft flight hours:
18422
Circumstances:
The purpose of the flight was for the commercial pilot/owner to pick up passengers at the destination airport and return to the departure airport. The airplane was 33 miles from its destination in cruise flight at 3,300 ft mean sea level (msl) and above a solid cloud layer when the pilot declared to air traffic control (ATC) that he had the destination airport "in sight" and cancelled his instrument flight rules (IFR) clearance. During the 13 minutes after cancellation of the IFR clearance, the airplane's radar track made an erratic sequence of left, right, and 360° turns that moved the airplane away from the destination airport in a westerly direction. The altitudes varied between about 4,000 and 900 ft msl. Later, the pilot reestablished communication with ATC, reported he had lost visual contact with the airport, and requested an instrument approach to the destination airport. The controller then provided a sequence of heading and altitude assignments to vector the airplane onto the approach, but the pilot did not maintain these assignments, and the controller provided several corrections. The pilot expressed his inability to identify the initial approach fix (IAF) and asked the controller for the correct spelling. The radar target then climbed and subsequently entered a descending right turn at 2,500 ft msl and 180 knots ground speed near the IAF, before radar contact with the airplane was lost. Although a review of airplane maintenance records revealed that the airplane was overdue for several required inspections, examination of the wreckage revealed signatures consistent with both engines being at high power at impact, and no evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomalies were found that would have precluded normal operation. Examination of the airplane's panel-mounted GPS, which the pilot was using to navigate the flight, revealed that the navigation and obstruction databases were expired. During a weather briefing before the flight, the pilot was warned of low ceilings and visibility. The weather conditions reported near the destination airport about the time of the accident also included low ceilings and visibilities. The restricted visibility conditions and the high likelihood of inadvertent entry into instrument meteorological conditions were conducive to the development of spatial disorientation. The flight's erratic track, which included altitude and directional changes inconsistent with progress toward the airport, were likely the result of spatial disorientation. After reestablishing contact with ATC and being cleared to conduct an instrument approach to the destination, the airplane's flight track indicated that the pilot was not adequately prepared to execute the controller's instructions. The pilot's subsequent loss of control was likely the result of spatial disorientation due to his increased workload and operational distractions associated with his attempts to configure his navigation radios or reference charts. Postaccident toxicological testing of samples obtained from the pilot revealed the presence of ethanol; however, it could not be determined what percentage was ingested or produced postmortem. The testing also revealed the presence of amphetamine, an opioid painkiller, two sedating antihistamines, and marijuana. Although blood level quantification of these medications and drugs could not be made from the samples provided, their combined effects would have directly impacted the pilot's decision-making and ability to fly the airplane, even if each individual substance was only present in small amounts. Based in the reported weather conditions at the time the pilot reported the airport in sight and canceled his IFR clearance, he likely was not in a position to have seen the destination airport even though he may have been flying between cloud layers or may have momentarily observed the ground. His decision to cancel his IFR clearance so far from the destination, in an area characterized by widespread low ceilings and reduced visibility, increased the pilot's exposure to the hazards those conditions posed to the successful completion of his flight. The pilot showed other lapses in judgment associated with conducting this flight at the operational, aircraft, and the personal level. For example, 1) the pilot did not appear to recognize the significance of widespread low ceilings and visibility along his route of flight and at his destination (nor did he file an alternate airport even though conditions warranted); 2) the accident airplane was being operated beyond mandatory inspection intervals; and 3) toxicological testing showed the pilot had taken a combination of multiple medications and drugs that would have likely been impairing and contraindicated for the safe operation of an airplane. The pilot's decision-making was likely affected by the medications and drugs.
Probable cause:
The pilot's loss of airplane control due to spatial disorientation. Also causal to the accident was the pilot's impairment by the combined effects of multiple medications and drugs.
Final Report:

Crash of an Airbus A300B4-203F in Afgooye

Date & Time: Oct 12, 2015 at 1930 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SU-BMZ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Oostend – Cairo – Mogadishu
MSN:
129
YOM:
5
Flight number:
TSY810
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a cargo flight from Ostend to Mogadishu with an intermediate stop in Cairo with perishable goods on board on behalf of the AMISOM, the African Mission in Somalia. The final approach to Mogadishu-Aden Adde International Airport was performed by night. The crew was unable to localize the runway so decided to abandon the approach and made a go around. A second attempt and maybe a third one failed as well and the crew completed a go around and continued to the north of the capital city. Eventually, the captain decided to make an emergency belly landing in a field located near Afgooye, about 25 km north of Mogadishu. On landing, the aircraft lost both engines and came to rest in the bush. Two crew members were taken to hospital while four others were unhurt. The aircraft was damaged beyond economical repair. According to Somalian Authorities, the International Airport of Mogadishu is open to traffic from 0600LT to 1800LT. For undetermined reason, the crew started the descent while the airport seems to be already closed (sunset at 1747LT). Also, an emergency landing was unavoidable, probably due to a fuel exhaustion. It is not known yet why the crew did not divert to the alternate airport. It is also not indicated if the airport was equipped with approach lights or not.

Ground fire of a Boeing 777-266ER in Cairo

Date & Time: Jul 29, 2011 at 0911 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SU-GBP
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cairo - Jeddah
MSN:
28423/71
YOM:
1997
Flight number:
MS667
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
10
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
307
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
16982
Captain / Total hours on type:
5314.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2247
Copilot / Total hours on type:
198
Aircraft flight hours:
48281
Aircraft flight cycles:
11448
Circumstances:
Aircraft was parked at gate F7, terminal 3, with its 10 crew and 307 passengers on board, ready for departure. A fire erupted in the cockpit and smoke enter the cabin. While the captain tried to extinguish the fire, the decision was taken to deplane all 317 occupants. Fire brigade arrived on scene within three minutes but the fire destroyed all the cockpit and some holes were also visible on the right side of the fuselage. While only seven people were slightly injured, the aircraft was considered as damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Probable causes for the accident can be reached through:
- Accurate and thorough reviewing of the factual information and the analysis sections
- Excluding the irrelevant probable causes included in the analysis section
Examination of the aircraft revealed that the fire originated near the first officer's oxygen mask supply tubing, which is located underneath the side console below the no. 3 right hand flight deck window. Oxygen from the flight crew oxygen system is suspected to have contributed to the fire's intensity and speed.
The cause of the fire could not be conclusively determined. It is not yet known whether the oxygen system breach occurred first, providing a flammable environment or whether the oxygen system breach occurred as a result of the fire.
Accident could be related to the following probable causes:
1. Electrical fault or short circuit resulted in electrical heating of flexible hoses in the flight crew oxygen system. (Electrical Short Circuits; contact between aircraft wiring and oxygen system components may be possible if multiple wire clamps are missing or fractured or if wires are incorrectly installed).
2. Exposure to Electrical Current
Final Report:

Mishap of a Boeing 747-300 in Cairo

Date & Time: Jul 17, 2010 at 0730 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HS-VAC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cairo - Jeddah
MSN:
23056/587
YOM:
1983
Flight number:
SV9302
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
22
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crew was engaged in a positioning flight to Jeddah from Cairo. On departure, engine number four experienced an uncontained failure. Take off procedure was rejected and aircraft came to a halt and was later transferred to a hangar. All 22 crew members escaped unhurt but aircraft was later considered as damaged beyond repair. It was leased to Phuket Air.
Probable cause:
Failure of # four engine on take off.

Crash of a Boeing 707 in Cairo

Date & Time: Apr 2, 2004 at 0500 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SU-AVZ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Le Caire-Ostende
MSN:
20762
YOM:
1973
Flight number:
MHS200
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On takeoff, the aircraft veered off runway after a gear collapsed. One or more engines were badly damaged and the aircraft was declared as write off.

Crash of a Boeing 737-500 in Tunis: 14 killed

Date & Time: May 7, 2002 at 1517 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SU-GBI
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Le Caire-Tunis
MSN:
25307
YOM:
1991
Flight number:
MS843
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
55
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
14
Aircraft flight hours:
26082
Aircraft flight cycles:
15686

Crash of an Airbus A320 in Bahrain: 143 killed

Date & Time: Aug 23, 2000 at 1939 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
A40-EK
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Cairo - Bahrain - Muscat
MSN:
481
YOM:
1994
Flight number:
GF072
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
135
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
143
Captain / Total flying hours:
4416
Captain / Total hours on type:
1083.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
608
Copilot / Total hours on type:
408
Aircraft flight hours:
17370
Aircraft flight cycles:
13990

Crash of a Boeing 767 off New York: 217 killed

Date & Time: Oct 31, 1999 at 0150 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SU-GAP
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Los Angeles - New York - Cairo
MSN:
24542
YOM:
1989
Flight number:
MS990
Crew on board:
15
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
202
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
217
Captain / Total flying hours:
14384
Captain / Total hours on type:
6356.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
12538
Copilot / Total hours on type:
5191
Aircraft flight hours:
33354
Aircraft flight cycles:
7594
Circumstances:
Crashed into the sea off the US coast, causing the death of all 217 occupants.
Probable cause:
According to US authorities, the accident was caused by the suicide of the copilot.