Crash of a Beechcraft A60 Duke near Santa Rosa: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 5, 2019 at 1559 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N102SN
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Arlington - Santa Fe
MSN:
P-217
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane departed Arlington Municipal Airport at 1431LT bound for Santa Fe. En route, while cruising at an altitude of 9,700 feet, the pilot informed ATC about engine problems and was cleared to divert to Santa Rosa-Route 66 Airport at 1551. The pilot continued the descent when control was lost and the airplane crashed eight minutes later few miles from the airport. Both occupants have been killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke in Fullerton: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 18, 2019 at 1950 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N65MY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Fullerton - Heber City
MSN:
P-314
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 24 at Fullerton Airport, while climbing to a height of 50 feet at a speed of 69 knots, the twin engine airplane went out of control and crashed in flames onto the runway. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot, sole on board, was killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft 60 Duke in Destin: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 30, 2018 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N1876L
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Toledo - Destin
MSN:
P-386
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
While approaching runway 14 at Destin-Executive Airport, the twin engine aircraft struck tree tops and crashed in a wooded area located northwest of the airfield. The airplane was destroyed and all four occupants have been killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke near Ferris

Date & Time: Mar 1, 2018 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N77MM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Addison – Mexia
MSN:
P-587
YOM:
1982
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6400
Captain / Total hours on type:
2200.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2210
Circumstances:
The pilot in the multi-engine, retractable landing gear airplane reported that, during an instrument flight rules cross-country flight, about 5,000 ft above mean sea level, the left engine surged several times and he performed an emergency engine shutdown. Shortly afterward, the right engine lost power. During the emergency descent, the airplane struck treetops, and landed hard in a field with the landing gear retracted. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the engine mounts, and the lower fuselage. The pilot reported that he had requested 200 gallons of fuel from his home airport fixed base operator, but they did not fuel the airplane. The pilot did not check the fuel quantity during his preflight inspection. According to the Federal Aviation Administration Airplane Flying Handbook, Chapter 2, page 2-7, pilots must always positively confirm the fuel quantity by visually inspecting the fuel level in each tank. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper preflight inspection of the fuel level, which resulted in a loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to lower the landing gear before the emergency landing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke in Duette: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 4, 2017 at 1330 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N39AG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
P-425
YOM:
1977
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1120
Captain / Total hours on type:
200.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
20900
Copilot / Total hours on type:
165
Aircraft flight hours:
3271
Circumstances:
The private pilot, who had recently purchased the airplane, and the flight instructor were conducting an instructional flight in the multi-engine airplane to meet insurance requirements. Radar data for the accident flight, which occurred on the second day of 2 days of training, showed the airplane maneuvering between 1,000 ft and 1,200 ft above ground level (agl) just before the accident. The witness descriptions of the accident were consistent with the airplane transitioning from slow flight into a stall that developed into a spin from which the pilots were unable to recover before the airplane impacted terrain. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal evidence of any preexisting mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. After the first day of training, the pilot told friends and fellow pilots that the instructor provided non-standard training that included stall practice that required emergency recoveries at low airspeed and low altitude. The instructor used techniques that were not in keeping with established flight training standards and were not what would be expected from an individual with his extensive background in general aviation flight instruction. Most critically, the instructor used two techniques that introduced unnecessary risk: increasing power before reducing the angle of attack during a stall recovery and introducing asymmetric power while recovering from a stall in a multi-engine airplane; both techniques are dangerous errors because they can lead to an airplane entering a spin. At one point during the first day of training, the airplane entered a full stall and spun before control was regained at very low altitude. The procedures performed contradicted standard practice and Federal Aviation Administration guidance; yet, despite the pilot's experience in multi-engine airplanes and in the accident airplane make and model, he chose to continue the second day of training with the instructor instead of seeking a replacement to complete the insurance check out. The spin encountered on the accident flight likely resulted from the stall recovery errors advocated by the instructor and practiced on the prior day's flight. Unlike the previous flight, the accident flight did not have sufficient altitude for recovery because of the low altitude it was operating at, which was below the safe altitude required for stall training (one which allows recovery no lower than 3,000 ft agl).
Probable cause:
The pilots' decision to perform flight training maneuvers at low airspeed at an altitude that was insufficient for stall recovery. Contributing to the accident was the flight instructor's inappropriate use of non-standard stall recovery techniques.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 60 Duke near Jackson: 8 killed

Date & Time: Nov 6, 1978 at 2046 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N135D
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Montgomery - Tulsa
MSN:
P-7
YOM:
1968
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
8
Captain / Total flying hours:
2000
Captain / Total hours on type:
60.00
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was completing a demo flight from Montgomery, Alabama, to Tulsa, Oklahoma, carrying seven passengers and a pilot. While cruising at an altitude of 14,000 feet in icing conditions, the pilot informed ATC about an engine failure and was cleared to divert to Jackson-Municipal Airport. On descent, the aircraft went out of control and crashed few miles from Jackson Airport. The aircraft was destroyed and all eight occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Uncontrolled collision with ground on final approach due to powerplant failure for undetermined reasons. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Diverted attention from operation of aircraft,
- Improper in-flight decisions,
- Icing conditions including sleet, freezing rain,
- Fog,
- Complete failure on one engine,
- Weather briefing included freezing level 13,000 to 15,000 feet,
- Cruising altitude 14,000 feet.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 60 Duke in Faribault: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jul 12, 1978 at 0758 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N777HH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Olivia - Lafayette
MSN:
P-109
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
3209
Captain / Total hours on type:
338.00
Circumstances:
En route from Olivia to Lafayette, Indiana, while in normal cruise, the pilot encountered poor weather conditions with thunderstorm activity and turbulences. The airplane went out of control, entered an uncontrolled descent, suffered a general disintegration and crashed in an open field. All six occupants were killed. It was determined that the pilot departed Olivia with the aircraft's weather radar inoperative.
Probable cause:
Airframe failure and subsequent uncontrolled descent after the pilot attempted operation with known deficiencies in equipment. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Exceeded designed stress limits of aircraft,
- Thunderstorm activity,
- Turbulences associated with clouds and thunderstorm,
- Separation in flight,
- Weather radar inoperative.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke in Palm Desert: 6 killed

Date & Time: Apr 15, 1976 at 1455 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N37D
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
San Diego – Palm Springs
MSN:
P-335
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
4900
Captain / Total hours on type:
38.00
Circumstances:
En route from San Diego to Palm Springs, weather conditions deteriorated and the twin engine airplane entered a thunderstorm area with severe turbulences and strong winds. The right empennage assembly and the right outboard wing panel failed in flight, causing the airplane to enter an uncontrolled descent and to crash in flames near Palm Desert. The aircraft was destroyed and all six occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Airframe failure in flight and uncontrolled descent after the pilot exceeded the designed stress limits of the aircraft. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Windshear,
- Turbulences associated with clouds and thunderstorms,
- Overload failure,
- Continued VFR flight in adverse weather conditions,
- Separation in flight,
- Weather slightly worse than forecast,
- Gusts 80 knots,
- Severe turbulence was reported in area.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke in Houston: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 21, 1975 at 2130 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N8794R
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Brownsville - Houston
MSN:
P-294
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
15060
Captain / Total hours on type:
180.00
Circumstances:
While on a night approach to Houston Airport, the pilot encountered poor weather conditions with low clouds and fog. He descended too low until the aircraft collided with ground about two miles short of runway. All three passengers were injured while the pilot was killed.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into terrain on final approach due to improper IFR operation. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Misread instruments or failed to read,
- Low ceiling,
- Fog,
- Limited visibility to 1/2 mile or less,
- Sky obscured,
- Descended into ground about 2 miles short of runway in below minima conditions.
Final Report: