code

FL

Crash of a Convair C-131B Samaritan off Miami: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 8, 2019 at 1215 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N145GT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nassau - Miami
MSN:
256
YOM:
1955
Flight number:
QAI504
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
23000
Captain / Total hours on type:
725.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
650
Copilot / Total hours on type:
305
Circumstances:
The airplane departed Nassau-Lynden Pindling Airport at 1113LT back to Opa Locka in Miami after delivering various goods. At 1203LT, while cruising at an altitude of 4,300 feet in good weather conditions, the crew declared an emergency and informed ATC about a double engine failure. The crew elected to ditch the aircraft that crashed into the sea 12 minutes later about 13 miles east of the Bay Harbor Islands. Coast Guards were quickly dispatched on the scene and the copilot aged 28 was able to climb by himself in the rescue basket and to be airlifted to hospital. Unfortunately, the captain aged 68 died. On Feb 22nd 2019 the NTSB released a preliminary report stating the crew had departed Opa Locka for Nassau with 900 gallons of fuel on board but experienced trouble with the left hand propeller control enroute to Nassau when the propeller became stuck at 2,400 rpm. The crew was unable to reset the propeller control. A message sent to maintenance did not transmit. The captain decided that they wouldn't start up for the return flight, if the propeller control had not reset they'd shut down again and wait for maintenance. Both engines and propellers came up normally however and they departed for Opa Locka. Climbing through 4,000 feet the left hand propeller became again stuck at 2,400 rpm. The captain managed to bump the propeller up to 2,700 rpm, equalized power on both engines, levelled off at 4,500 feet, cancelled the IFR flight plan and continued visually to Opa Locka. The flight was uneventful until they began the descent to 1,500 feet. At that point the right hand engine "backfired" and surged. The crew shut the engine down. A short time later the left hand engine also backfired and surged. The captain continued flying the aircraft while the first officer worked the related checklists, however, when they were getting too low and it became clear they had to ditch the captain instructed to declare Mayday and brace for impact.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu off Ponte Vedra Beach: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 20, 2018 at 0904 LT
Registration:
N307JM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Kissimmee - Princeton
MSN:
46-36253
YOM:
2000
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft departed Kissimmee Airport at 0822LT on a flight to Princeton-Rocky Hill Airport, New Jersey. At 0901LT, while flying along the shore (east Florida coast) at an altitude of 22,000 feet, the airplane lost height and descended to 1,500 feet in two minutes while its speed dropped from 234 mph to just 60 mph. After it spiraled down, the airplane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off Ponte Vedra Beach. SAR operations were dispatched but after a day, the aircraft and both occupants were still missing and presumed dead.

Crash of a Beechcraft 60 Duke in Destin: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 30, 2018 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N1876L
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Toledo - Destin
MSN:
P-386
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
While approaching runway 14 at Destin-Executive Airport, the twin engine aircraft struck tree tops and crashed in a wooded area located northwest of the airfield. The airplane was destroyed and all four occupants have been killed.

Crash of a Quest Kodiak 100 off Welaka: 2 killed

Date & Time: Feb 27, 2018 at 1930 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N969TB
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Welaka - Welaka
MSN:
100-0173
YOM:
2016
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
On February 27, 2018, about 1930 eastern standard time, a Quest Kodiak 100, N969TB, was substantially damaged after it impacted a river near Georgetown, Florida. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by an individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and there was no flight plan filed for the flight, which was destined for Mount Royal Airport (3FL0), Welaka, Florida. According to preliminary air traffic control data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), a radar target identified as the accident airplane overflew 3FL0 and then proceeded to make a right turn toward and over the Ocala National Forest. It circled back to the airport, overflew it, and entered a left turn. The airplane continued the left turn, again overflew the airport, and impacted a river that was about 1 mile to the west of the airport. According to a witness, the airplane departed 3FL0 on the day of the accident around 1530. Another witness, observed the airplane shortly before the accident and noted that it was flying "really low," and was in a 45° bank left turn, "wobbled" once, and then continued the turn. In addition, she noted that the lights on the airplane had "halos" around them because it was foggy, and that the engine sounded "fine." Local law enforcement and recovery personnel reported that there were no downed tree branches and no down powerlines in the along the shore in the vicinity of the accident site. Furthermore, recovery personnel noted several gallons of Jet A fuel draining from the airplane during recovery. According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, single-engine sea, multiengine land, multiengine sea, and instrument airplane. The pilot was issued a third-class medical certificate on November 27, 2016. At that time, he reported 3,400 hours of total flight time, of which the 20 hours were within the previous 6 months of the medical examination.According to FAA records, the pilot-rated passenger held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land and airplane multiengine sea. He held commercial certificate ratings for airplane single-engine land and airplane single-engine sea. In addition, he held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine and instrument airplane. His most recent second-class medical certificate was issued on October 4, 2013. According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 2016 and issued an airworthiness certificate in April 2016. In addition, it was equipped with a Pratt and Whitney Canada PT6A34, 750-horsepower engine that powered a 4-bladed Hartzell constant speed propeller. The 1915 recorded weather observation at Palatka Municipal Airport – Lt. Kay Larkin Field (28J), Palatka, Florida, which was about 13 miles to the north of the accident location, included wind from 050° at 8 knots, visibility 10 miles, overcast clouds at 1,500 feet above ground level, temperature 17° C, dew point 15° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.25 inches of mercury. The airplane impacted a river and came to rest inverted in about 10 feet of water. All major components of the airplane were recovered from the river except the outboard section of the left wing and the left aileron. The forward section of the fuselage was impact-crushed aft. The right wing was impact separated from the fuselage and when the wing was moved for the wreckage examination, an unquantified amount of jet A fuel drained from the wing. The left wing was impact separated from the fuselage and the left flap was separated from the left wing. The flap jackscrew was measured and corresponded to a full flap position. The empennage remained attached to the fuselage and the horizontal stabilizers and elevators were cut to facilitate recovery. Flight control continuity was obtained from all flight control surfaces to the cockpit through tensile overload breaks and cuts made to facilitate recovery. The propeller remained attached to the reduction gearbox but was separated from the engine. All four propeller blades remained attached to the hub and three were not in the feathered position. Two of the propeller blades exhibited S-bending, the other 2 blades were bent aft, and leading-edge gouging was noted on three of the blades. The engine was impact-separated and recovered from the river. The left exhaust stack was impact crushed and the right exhaust stack received minor impact damage. The reduction gear box chip detector was examined, and no debris was noted. Continuity was confirmed between the compressor turbine and the accessory section of the engine by rotating the compressor turbine. Rotational scoring was noted on the compressor turbine. The power turbine was examined and exhibited rotation scoring on the fir tree disk, the blades, and the leading edge of the shroud tips. In addition, the power turbine shroud exhibited rotational scoring. 3FL0 was a private airport located about 3 miles south of Welaka, Florida. The airport elevation was estimated at 41 feet mean sea level. The airport did not have an operating control tower at the time of the accident. Runway 8/25 was 3,000 ft long and 50 ft wide. There were no published instrument procedures into the airport. The airport was bordered to the west by the Ocala National Forest, which was 673 square miles of densely wooded and unlighted terrain.

Crash of a Cessna 340 in Bartow: 5 killed

Date & Time: Dec 24, 2017 at 0720 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N247AT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Bartow – Key West
MSN:
340-0214
YOM:
1973
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 27R at Bartow Airport, while in initial climb, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in flames near the runway end. The aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire and all five occupants were killed. At the time of the accident, the visibility was nil due to thick fog. According to local police officers who were working on a helicopter parked in a hangar at the airport, a departure in such low visibility was quite impossible. The pilot, aged 70, was flying to Key West with his two daughters aged 24 and 26, one of his sons-in-law and a friend.

Crash of a Piper PA-61 Aerostar in Miami: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 10, 2017 at 1450 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N7529S
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
61-0161-082
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Miami-Executive Airport, while in initial climb, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in a field located 1,5 mile west of the airport. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot was killed. The airplane was owned by Carman W. Rollo.

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air C90 near Sanford: 3 killed

Date & Time: Dec 8, 2017 at 1115 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N19LW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sanford - Sanford
MSN:
LJ-991
YOM:
1981
Flight number:
CONN900
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Sanford Airport at 0753LT with two Chinese passengers and one pilot (1st officer by Silver Airways) on a 3,5 hours flight over south Georgia and back. While approaching Sanford Airfield from the east, the twin engine airplane went out of control and crashed into Lake Harney located 10 miles east of the airport. The aircraft was lost and all three occupants were killed.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-500TP Malibu Meridian in Saint Petersburg

Date & Time: Nov 25, 2017 at 1319 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N863RB
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saint Petersburg – Pensacola
MSN:
46-97213
YOM:
2005
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft departed runway 36 at Saint Petersburg-Clearwater Airport at 1315LT bound for Pensacola. During initial climb, the pilot reported technical problems and elected to return for a safe landing. On final, the aircraft crashed in a field located near the runway 36 threshold. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot was seriously injured.

Crash of a Cessna 402B in St Petersburg

Date & Time: Oct 18, 2017 at 1545 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N900CR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Miami - Tallahassee
MSN:
402B-1356
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
En route from Opa Locka to Tallahassee, the pilot encountered an unexpected situation and apparently decided to divert to St Petersburg-Albert Whitted Airport. Eventually, he attempted an emergency landing when the airplane struck an electric pole and crashed on two occupied vehicles before coming to rest onto the intersection of 18th Avenue South and 16th Street South in St. Petersburg, about 1,5 mile from runway 07 threshold. The pilot and four peoples in the cars were injured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.