code

TX

Crash of a Socata TBM-850 in Breckenridge

Date & Time: Oct 14, 2019 at 1243 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N850NK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San Angelo - Breckenridge
MSN:
432
YOM:
2007
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed San Angelo-Mathis Field at 1210LT on a short flight to Breckenridge. While approaching Breckenridge-Stephens County Airport, the engine failed and caught fire. The pilot reduced his altitude and completed a belly landing in an open field located near the airport. Both occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was partially destroyed by fire.

Crash of a Beechcraft 350i Super King Air in Addison: 10 killed

Date & Time: Jun 30, 2019 at 0911 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N511EF
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Addison – Saint Petersburg
MSN:
FL-1091
YOM:
2017
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
10
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 15/33 at Addison Airport, while in initial climb, the twin engine airplane went out of control and crashed in flames onto a hangar located by the airport. The aircraft was totally destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all 10 occupants were killed.

Crash of a Boeing 767-375ER off Anahuac: 3 killed

Date & Time: Feb 23, 2019 at 1239 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1217A
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Miami - Houston
MSN:
25685/430
YOM:
1992
Flight number:
5Y3591
Location:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a cargo flight from Miami-Intl to Houston on behalf of Amazon Prime Air. Following an uneventful flight, he started the descent to Houston-George Bush International Airport at 1207LT. About 30 minutes later, in unclear circumstances, after being cleared to descent to 3,000 feet, the airplane went out of control, entered a rapid descent and crashed into the Trinity Bay, about 37 miles southeast of the airport. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and debris were found partially submerged off Anahuac. The accident was not survivable. The crew did not send any distress call prior to impact. According to NTSB, the aircraft entered a rapid descent from 6,000 ft and impacted a marshy bay area about 40 miles southeast of George Bush Intercontinental Airport (KIAH), Houston, Texas. Air traffic control communications and radar data indicated the flight was normal from Miami to the Houston terminal area. About 12:30 pm the pilots contacted the Houston terminal radar approach control (TRACON) arrival controller and reported descending for runway 26L; the airplane was at 17,800 ft with a ground speed 320 knots. At 12:34, the airplane was descending through 13,800 ft, and the controller advised of an area of light to heavy precipitation along the flight route and that they could expect vectors around the weather. About 12:35, the flight was transferred to the Houston TRACON final controller, and the pilot reported they had received the Houston Automatic Terminal Information System weather broadcast. The controller told the pilots to expect vectors to runway 26L and asked if they wanted to go to the west or north of the weather. Radar data indicated the airplane continued the descent through 12,000 ft with a ground speed of 290 knots, consistent with the arrival procedure. The pilots responded that they wanted to go to the west of the area of precipitation. The controller advised that to do so, they would need to descend to 3,000 ft expeditiously. About 12:37, the controller instructed the pilots to turn to a heading of 270°. Radar data indicated the airplane turned, and the automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) data indicated a selected heading of 270°. The airplane was descending through 8,500 ft at this time. About 12:38, the controller informed the pilots that they would be past the area of weather in about 18 miles, that they could expect a turn to the north for a base leg to the approach to runway 26L, and that weather was clear west of the precipitation area. The pilots responded, “sounds good” and “ok.” At this time, radar and ADS-B returns indicated the airplane levelled briefly at 6,200 ft and then began a slight climb to 6,300 ft. Also, about this time, the FDR data indicated that some small vertical accelerations consistent with the airplane entering turbulence. Shortly after, when the airplane’s indicated airspeed was steady about 230 knots, the engines increased to maximum thrust, and the airplane pitch increased to about 4° nose up and then rapidly pitched nose down to about 49° in response to column input. The stall warning (stick shaker) did not activate. FDR, radar, and ADS-B data indicated that the airplane entered a rapid descent on a heading of 270°, reaching an airspeed of about 430 knots. A security camera video captured the airplane in a steep, generally wings-level attitude until impact with the swamp. FDR data indicated that the airplane gradually pitched up to about 20 degrees nose down during the descent.

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III near Waterfield Lake: 2 killed

Date & Time: Feb 15, 2019 at 0957 LT
Registration:
N421NS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
421C-0874
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
On February 15, 2019, at 0957 central standard time, a Cessna 421C airplane, N421NS, impacted terrain about 8 miles west of Hemphill County Airport (HHF), Canadian, Texas. The private pilot and one passenger were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from the Tradewind Airport (TDW), Amarillo, Texas at 0900 and was en route to HHF. A witness who was monitoring the common traffic advisory frequency at HHF stated that he heard the pilot over the radio and responded. The pilot reportedly inquired about the cloud heights and the witness responded that the clouds were 800 to 1,000 ft above ground level. The witness did not see the airplane in the air. The airplane impacted terrain remote terrain in an upright and level attitude. A post impact fire consumed most of the wreckage.

Crash of a Canadair CL-601 Challenger in Ox Ranch

Date & Time: Jan 13, 2019 at 1200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N813WT
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
3016
YOM:
1983
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft, owned by a limited liability company and operated by an airline transport pilot, impacted terrain following a runway excursion at the Ox Ranch Airport (01TX), Uvalde, Texas. The captain, first officer flight attendant, and 6 passengers on board were not injured and the airplane sustained substantial damaged. The airplane was operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 charter flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight that originated at Addison, Texas, and was destined 01TX. A representative for the airport reported that the airplane on landing hit hard and the tire either popped or the landing gear tore off. About two-thirds of the way down runway 35, the airplane slid off the right side of the runway. The airplane proceeded through a ditch and struck a perimeter fence before coming to a stop. The right main and nose landing gear were collapsed and damaged. There was also damage to the right wing, right inboard flap, nose of the airplane, and the vertical stabilizer. At 1155, the weather conditions at Garner Field Airport (UVA), Uvalde, Texas, 24 nautical miles southeast of 01TX was wind 340°at 12 kts., visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 63°F, dew point 43°F and altimeter 30.17 inches of Mercury.

Crash of a Douglas C-47B in Burnet

Date & Time: Jul 21, 2018 at 0915 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N47HL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Burnet – Sedalia – Oshkosh
MSN:
15758/27203
YOM:
1945
Location:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
A Douglas C-47, named "Bluebonnet Belle", was involved in an accident during takeoff from runway 19 at Burnet Municipal Airport, Texas, USA. The aircraft came to rest in the grass next to the runway and burst into flames. The captain, crew chief, and 4 passengers sustained serious injuries, 1 passenger sustained minor injuries, and the co-pilot and 5 passengers were not injured. The aircraft was to be flown to a fly-in at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The co-pilot, who was the flying pilot reported that prior to the flight, it was briefed that he would perform the takeoff. He stated that the captain taxied the airplane to the runup area, where all pre-takeoff checks were completed; the captain then taxied the airplane onto runway 19. The co-pilot further stated that he then took control of the airplane, provided a pre-takeoff brief, and initiated the takeoff sequence. About 10 seconds into the takeoff roll, the airplane drifted right, at which time he applied left rudder input. This was followed shortly by the captain saying that he had the airplane. The captain, who was the non-flying pilot, reported to the NTSB that during the initial stages of the takeoff roll, he didn't recall the airplane swerving to the right, however, recalled telling the co-pilot not to push the tail up because it was heavy; he also remembered the airplane swerving to the left shortly thereafter. The captain stated that he yelled "right rudder" three times before taking control of the airplane. He said that as he put his hands on the control yoke, he noticed that either the tail started to come down or the main wheels were either light or were just coming off the ground as it exited the left side of the runway. The captain said that he knew the airplane was slow as he tried to ease it over [to the runway] and set it back down. Subsequently, he felt the 'shutter of a stall," and the airplane turned to the left and impacted the ground. After the airplane came to a stop, a post impact fire ensued, during which all the occupants of the airplane egressed through the aft left door. A video of the takeoff and accident sequence shows the aircraft accelerating on the runway, with the tailwheel leaving the ground very briefly. A few seconds after the tailwheel touched down again, the aircraft seems to drift off the left side of the runway. The aircraft banks right, causing the left hand main landing gear to become airborne. The right hand wing tip touched or almost touched the ground before the aircraft became airborne. The left wing dropped and the wing tip touched the ground, causing the plane to slew to the left and touch down again. The right hand main gear then seems to fold as the aircraft comes to rest in a cloud of dust. Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane came to rest upright on a heading of about 113° magnetic, about 145 ft east of the left side, and 2,638 ft from the approach end of runway 19. The post impact fire consumed the fuselage from the nose cone aft to about 3 ft forward of the left side cargo door along with a majority of the wing center section. No evidence of any flight control locks was found installed. The tailwheel locking pin was found in place and was sheered into multiple pieces. Vegetation (grass) within about 200 ft of the main wreckage was burnt from the post impact fire. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Crash of a Piper PA-31P Navajo in Laredo: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2018 at 1030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N82605
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
31P-7730010
YOM:
1977
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
4243
Aircraft flight hours:
3185
Circumstances:
On March 8, 2018, about 1038 central standard time, a Piper PA-31P airplane, N82605, impacted terrain during an approach to the Laredo International Airport (KLRD) Laredo, Texas. The commercial rated pilot and student pilot rated passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 fight. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site about the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. Shortly after departing runway 18R, the air traffic controller contacted the airplane and reported that smoke was coming from the left side of the airplane. The pilot reported "… we're gonna fix that". The airplane turned back to the airport and was cleared to land on runway 18L. Witnesses reporting seeing the airplane overhead trailing smoke or approaching the airport before the crash. Several airport security cameras captured the accident airplane airborne. A review of the video noted a white smoke trail behind the airplane. The smoke trail stops while the airplane is in the left downwind for the runway. The airplane initiated a left turn and as the airplane approaches the runway the bank angle increased. The airplane impacted terrain in a nose down, near vertical attitude; a post-crash fire ensued. The front of the airplane cabin/cockpit area was largely destroyed by the impact and fire. The major components were located at the crash site, parts were distributed between the aft cabin and the impact crater; however, several fragments of the airplane were scattered away from the impact point. Both wings were separated from the fuselage and had heavy thermal and impact damage. Both 3-bladed propellers had separated from their respective engines. Both engines had separated from the wing nacelles and were located near the fuselage. Both left and right engines had heavy impact/thermal damage. The engines were removed and examined on-site in a facility nearby. The engines turbocharger's V-band clamps were found in-place on the turbos exhaust system.

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke near Ferris

Date & Time: Mar 1, 2018 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N77MM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Addison – Mexia
MSN:
P-587
YOM:
1982
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6400
Captain / Total hours on type:
2200.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2210
Circumstances:
The pilot in the multi-engine, retractable landing gear airplane reported that, during an instrument flight rules cross-country flight, about 5,000 ft above mean sea level, the left engine surged several times and he performed an emergency engine shutdown. Shortly afterward, the right engine lost power. During the emergency descent, the airplane struck treetops, and landed hard in a field with the landing gear retracted. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the engine mounts, and the lower fuselage. The pilot reported that he had requested 200 gallons of fuel from his home airport fixed base operator, but they did not fuel the airplane. The pilot did not check the fuel quantity during his preflight inspection. According to the Federal Aviation Administration Airplane Flying Handbook, Chapter 2, page 2-7, pilots must always positively confirm the fuel quantity by visually inspecting the fuel level in each tank. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper preflight inspection of the fuel level, which resulted in a loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to lower the landing gear before the emergency landing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31T1 Cheyenne in Tyler: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 13, 2017 at 0810 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N47GW
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tyler - Midland
MSN:
31T-8104030
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
17590
Aircraft flight hours:
5685
Circumstances:
The airline transport rated pilot and passenger departed on a cross-country business flight in a twin-engine, turbo-propeller-equipped airplane in day, visual meteorological conditions. Shortly after takeoff, the airplane banked left, descended, and impacted terrain about 1/2 mile from the end of the runway. There was not a post-crash fire and fuel was present on site. A postaccident airframe examination did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Examination of the left engine found signatures consistent with the engine producing power at impact. Examination of the right engine revealed rotational scoring on the compressor turbine disc/blades, and rotational scoring on the upstream side of the power vane and baffle, which indicated that the compressor section was rotating at impact; however, the lack of rotational scoring on the power turbine disc assembly, indicated the engine was not producing power at impact. Testing of the right engine's fuel control unit, fuel pump, propeller governor, and overspeed governor did not reveal any abnormities that would have accounted for the loss of power. The reason for the loss of right engine power could not be determined based on the available information.
Probable cause:
The loss of engine power and the subsequent pilot's loss of control for reasons that could not be determined because post-accident engine examination revealed no anomalies.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Alpine

Date & Time: Jul 3, 2017 at 1815 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N9714B
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Alpine – Midland
MSN:
208B-0153
YOM:
1989
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Alpine, Texas. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Martinaire Aviation LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a cargo flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the instrument rules (IFR) flight, which departed about 1812 from Alpine-Casparis Municipial Airport (E38), Alpine, Texas, with an intended destination of Maverick County Memorial International Airport (5T9), Eagle Pass, Texas. While climbing through about 500 ft agl, the pilot heard a loud bang, followed by a squealing noise and an immediate loss of engine power. The pilot released back pressure on the controls and pulled the propeller control to feather. During the forced landing, the right and left wings were damaged due to impact with power poles and the airplane came to rest in a field.