code

TN

Crash of a Cessna 680A Citation Latitude in Elizabethton

Date & Time: Aug 15, 2019 at 1540 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N8JR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Statesville - Elizabethton
MSN:
680A-0010
YOM:
2015
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
1165
Circumstances:
On August 15, 2019, about 1537 eastern daylight time, a Textron Aviation Inc. 680A, N8JR, was destroyed during a runway excursion after landing at Elizabethton Municipal Airport (0A9), Elizabethton, Tennessee. The airline transport-rated pilot and copilot were not injured. The three passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to JRM Air LLC and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight originated at Statesville Regional Airport (SVH), Statesville, North Carolina at 1519 and was destined for 0A9. According to the flight crew, the flight departed SVH under visual flight rules and climbed to 12,500 ft. No air traffic control services were requested. The preflight, departure, and en route portions of the flight were routine. Approaching 0A9, the crew announced their intentions to
land on runway 24 via the airport's common traffic advisory frequency Airport surveillance video captured the initial touchdown, which occurred near the runway touchdown zone, and portions of the accident sequence. The airplane bounced twice, then continued airborne down runway 24 until it touched down a third time with about 1,000 ft of paved surface remaining. The video revealed that the right main landing gear collapsed and the outboard section of the right wing contacted the runway shortly after the third touchdown. The airplane departed the paved surface beyond the runway 24 departure end threshold, through an open area of grass, down an embankment, through a chain-link fence, and up an embankment, coming to rest on the edge of Tennessee Highway 91. The pilots' account of the landing was generally consistent with the video. The pilots also reported that, following the second bounce, a go-around was attempted; however, the airplane did not respond as expected, so they landed straight-ahead on the runway and could not stop the airplane prior to the excursion. After the airplane came to a stop, the flight crew secured the engines and assisted the passengers with the evacuation. The main entry door was utilized to exit the airplane. A postaccident fire was in progress during the evacuation. The airplane came to rest upright, on a true heading of 285º. The fuselage aft of the main entry door, the right wing, and the empennage were consumed by the postaccident fire. The left main and nose landing gear were separated from the airframe during the impact sequence. The right main landing gear remained under the right wing and was heavily fire damaged. The airplane, also known as the Citation Latitude, was a low wing, cruciform tail design with twin, fuselage-mounted Pratt and Whitney Canada 360D turbofan engines. It was equipped with two cockpit seats and nine passenger seats. The airplane was built in 2015 and the owner purchased the airplane new. The total time of the airframe was about 1,165 hours. The maximum takeoff weight was 31,025 lbs. The cockpit, which was undamaged by fire, was equipped with a Garmin G5000 advanced integrated flight deck (flat screen displays and touch screen controls) that recorded numerous flight and systems parameters. The data was successfully downloaded following the accident. The airplane was also equipped with a cockpit voice recorder (CVR). The CVR was damaged by the postaccident fire and was sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, DC for examination and download. The pilot, seated in the left cockpit seat and acting as the flying pilot and pilot-in-command,
held an airline transport pilot certificate and a type rating in the accident airplane. He reported 5,800 hours total flight experience, including 765 hours in the accident airplane. His latest recurrent training occurred in October 2018. The copilot, seated in the right cockpit seat, held an airline transport pilot certificate and a type rating in the accident airplane. He reported 11,000 hours total flight experience, including 1,165 hours in the accident airplane. His latest recurrent training occurred in October 2018. The reported weather at 0A9 at 1535 included calm wind, 10 miles visibility, scattered clouds at 4,700 and 5,500 ft, broken clouds at 7,000 ft, and altimeter setting 29.97 inches of mercury. The wreckage was retained for further examination. All five occupants were able to evacuate the cabin before the aircraft would be completely destroyed by fire. Runway 24 is 4,500 feet long with a displaced threshold (LDA is 4,100 feet). Passengers were the US Nascar racer Dale Earnhardt, his wife and daughter.

Crash of a Rockwell Gulfstream Jetprop 840 in Bellevue: 4 killed

Date & Time: Feb 3, 2014 at 1655 LT
Registration:
N840V
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Great Bend – Nashville
MSN:
11727
YOM:
1982
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
3205
Captain / Total hours on type:
719.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4460
Circumstances:
The instrument-rated private pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight in the multiengine airplane under instrument flight rules (IFR). As the flight neared its destination, the controller issued clearance for a GPS approach, and, shortly thereafter, the pilot informed the controller that he needed to review the approach procedure before continuing the approach. The controller acknowledged, and, after the pilot reported that he was ready to proceed with the approach, the controller again issued clearance for the GPS approach. Radar data showed that, during the approach, the airplane tracked a course that was offset about 0.5 miles right of the final approach course until it was about 1 mile from the runway threshold. The airplane then turned left towards the threshold and descended to an altitude of about 145 ft above ground level over the runway threshold before the pilot performed a missed approach. It is likely that the pilot performed the missed approach because he was unable to align the airplane with the runway before it crossed the threshold. The controller provided radar vectors for the airplane to return to the approach course and cleared the airplane a third time for the GPS approach to the runway. Radar data showed that the airplane was established on the final approach course as it passed the initial approach fix; however, before it reached the final approach fix, its airspeed slowed to about 111 knots, and it began a left turn with a 25 degree bank angle. About 18 seconds later, while still in the turn, the airplane slowed to 108 knots and began descending rapidly. The airplane's rate of descent exceeded 10,000 feet per minute, and it impacted the ground about 9 miles from the destination airport. Examination of the accident site showed that the airplane was severely fragmented and fire damaged with debris scattered for about 450 feet. Postaccident examination of the wreckage did not reveal evidence of any preimpact failures; however, damage to the left engine indicated that it was not producing power at the time of the accident. The severity of impact and fire damage to the airplane and engine precluded determination of the reason for the loss of left engine power. Weather conditions present at the time of the accident were conducive to super cooled liquid water droplets, and the airplane likely encountered moderate or greater icing conditions. Several pilot reports (PIREPs) for moderate, light, trace, and negative icing were reported to air traffic control but were not distributed publicly into the national airspace system, and there was no airmen's meteorological information (AIRMET) issued for icing. However, the pilot received standard and abbreviated weather briefings for the flight, and his most recent weather briefing included three PIREPs for icing conditions in the area of the accident site. Given the weather information provided, the pilot should have known icing conditions were possible. Even so, the public distribution of additional PIREPs would have likely increased the weather situational awareness by the pilot, weather forecasters, and air traffic controllers. The airplane was equipped with deicing and anti-icing systems that included wing and empennage deice boots and engine inlet heaters. Due to impact damage to the cockpit, the positions of the switches for the ice protection systems at the time of the accident could not be determined. Although the airplane's airspeed of 108 knots when the steep descent began was above its published stall speed of 77 knots, both bank angle and ice accretion would have increased the stall speed. In addition, the published minimum control airspeed was 93 knots. It is likely that, after the airplane passed the initial approach fix, the left engine lost power, the airplane's airspeed began to decay, and the asymmetric thrust resulted in a left turn. As the airspeed continued to decay, it decreased below either stall speed or minimum control airspeed, and the airplane entered an uncontrolled descent.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed with one engine inoperative, which resulted in a loss of control while on approach. Contributing to the accident were airframe ice accumulation due to conditions conducive to icing and the loss of engine power on one engine for reasons that could not be determined due to the extent of damage to the airplane.
Final Report:

Mishap of a Beechcraft King Air A100 in Blountville

Date & Time: Jun 15, 2011 at 1405 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N15L
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Bridgewater - Wichita
MSN:
B-212
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4837
Captain / Total hours on type:
87.00
Aircraft flight hours:
16170
Circumstances:
The airplane was flying in instrument meteorological conditions at flight level 200 (about 20,000 feet), and a large area of thunderstorm activity was located to the northwest. About 20 miles from the thunderstorm activity, the airplane began to encounter moderate turbulence and severe icing conditions. The pilot deviated to the south; however, the turbulence increased, and the airplane entered an uncommanded left roll and dive. The autopilot disengaged, and the pilot's attitude indicator dropped. The pilot leveled the airplane at an altitude of 8,000 feet and landed without further incident. Subsequent examination revealed that one-third of the outboard left elevator separated in flight and that the empennage was substantially damaged. Meteorological and radar data revealed the airplane entered an area of rapidly intensifying convective activity, which developed along the airplane's flight path, and likely encountered convectively-induced turbulence with a high probability of significant icing. The effect of icing conditions on the initiation of the upset could not be determined; however, airframe structural icing adversely affects an airplane's performance and can result in a loss of control.
Probable cause:
An encounter with convectively-induced turbulence and icing, which resulted in an in-flight upset and a loss of airplane control.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2 Marquise in Millington

Date & Time: Dec 9, 2008 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N452MA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Millington-Millington
MSN:
1533
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:

After take off, pilot informed ATC about engine problem and elected to return. On landing, the aircraft left the runway, lost its nose landing gear while the left wing was partially sheared off. The pilot was injured.

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air 90 in Chattanooga

Date & Time: Sep 19, 2007 at 2015 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N10TM
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Birmingham-Chattanooga
MSN:
LJ-0476
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
11150
Captain / Total hours on type:
371.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9638
Circumstances:
On final approach to Chattanooga airport, pilot informed ATC about engine problem. The aircraft stalled and crashed in a parking lot located half a mile short of runway. The aircraft was destroyed and all occupants escaped injured.

Crash of a Douglas DC-10 in Memphis

Date & Time: Jul 28, 2006 at 1125 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N391FE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Seattle-Memphis
MSN:
46625/169
YOM:
1975
Flight number:
FDX630
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
11262
Captain / Total hours on type:
4402.00
Aircraft flight hours:
73283
Aircraft flight cycles:
27002

Crash of a Swearingen SA227AC Metro III in Paris: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 8, 2006 at 1210 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N629EK
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Dayton-Harlingen
MSN:
TC-396
YOM:
1980
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
5237
Captain / Total hours on type:
164.00
Aircraft flight hours:
15883
Circumstances:
The pilot was performing a cargo flight from Dayton, Ohio, to Harlingen, Texas. While overflying Tennessee, the aircraft encountered engine problems, dived and crashed in a wooded area in Henry County, near Paris, 85 miles west of Nashville. The pilot was killed on impact and the plane was embedded 10-15 feet in dirt.

Crash of a Cessna 421 Golden Eagle in Tennessee: 5 killed

Date & Time: Dec 2, 2004 at 1324 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N421SD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Collegedale-Knoxville
MSN:
421-0386
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
4475
Captain / Total hours on type:
2000.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6808
Circumstances:

Six minutes after takeoff from runway 03, the twin engine aircraft crashed in a wooded area and burst into flames. The pilot lost control of the aircraft after the right engine failed during climb. After left engine lost power, the pilot shut down the right wngine by mistake.

Crash of a Douglas DC-10 in Memphis

Date & Time: Dec 18, 2003 at 1226 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N364FE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Oakland-Memphis
MSN:
46600
YOM:
1971
Flight number:
FDX647
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4802
Captain / Total hours on type:
2674.00
Aircraft flight hours:
65375
Aircraft flight cycles:
26163
Circumstances:
On landing on runway 36R, the right main landing gear collapsed and the aircraft veered off runway before stopping in flames.

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in Greeneville: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 11, 2003 at 1047 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1592T
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Port Columbus-Greeneville
MSN:
414-0372
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
4845
Captain / Total hours on type:
160.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4989
Circumstances:
On approach, the twin engine aircraft struck trees and crashed in a wooded area, few miles short of runway 23 at Greeneville-Greene County airport, Tennessee. Only one passenger survived the crash. It seems that the accident occurred in icing conditions.