Country

Crash of a Beechcraft 200 Super King in Whatì: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 30, 2019 at 0915 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-GTUC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Yellowknife – Whatì
MSN:
BB-268
YOM:
1977
Flight number:
8T503
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
While approaching Whatì Airfield in poor weather conditions (heavy snow falls), the twin engine airplane crashed in unknown circumstances about 30 km from the airport. The wreckage was localized a day later and it was confirmed that both pilots were killed. SAR operations were hampered by poor weather.

Crash of a Curtiss C-46A-45-CU Commando in Déline

Date & Time: Sep 25, 2015 at 1200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GTXW
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Yellowknife – Norman Wells
MSN:
30386
YOM:
1944
Country:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Enroute from Yellowknife to Norman Wells, an engine failed. The crew decided to divert to Déline Airport for an emergency landing but was unable to lower the gear. The pilot eventually completed a belly landing at Déline Airport. In light snow conditions, the aircraft skidded on runway, went off runway and came to rest in the bush. All four crew members were unhurt while the aircraft was damaged.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Great Slave Lake

Date & Time: Nov 20, 2014 at 0720 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FKAY
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Yellowknife – Fort Simpson
MSN:
208B-0470
YOM:
1995
Flight number:
8T223
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Few minutes after takeoff from Yellowknife, the pilot encountered severe icing conditions and decided to return to Yellowknife. Shortly later, he realized it was impossible to reach his departure point and was forced to attempt an emergency landing on the frozen Great Slave Lake, some 40 km west of Yellowknife. The aircraft hit the 'ground' and came to rest with its left main gear sheared off as well as a part of the left wing. All six occupants were rescued while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
- Not using all enroute information led the pilot to underestimate the severity and duration of the icing conditions that would be encountered.
- Inadequate awareness of aircraft limitations in icing conditions and incomplete weightand-balance calculations led to the aircraft being dispatched in an overweight state for the forecast icing conditions. The aircraft center of gravity was not within limits, and this led to a condition that increased stall speed and reduced aircraft climb performance.
- The pilot’s expectation that the flight was being undertaken at altitudes where it should have been possible to avoid icing or to move quickly to an altitude without icing conditions led to his decision to continue operation of the aircraft in icing conditions that exceeded the aircraft’s performance capabilities.
- The severity of the icing conditions encountered and the duration of the exposure resulted in reductions in aerodynamic performance, making it impossible to prevent descent of the aircraft.
- The inability to arrest descent of the aircraft resulted in the forced landing on the surface of Great Slave Lake and the collision with terrain.
- The Type C pilot self-dispatch system employed by Air Tindi did not have quality assurance oversight or adequate support systems. This contributed to the aircraft being dispatched in conditions not suitable for safe flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-3 Otter in Ivanhoe Lake: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 22, 2013 at 1200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FSGD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Scott Lake Lodge - Ivanhoe Lake
MSN:
316
YOM:
1959
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Pilot was performing a positionning flight from Scott Lake Lodge, Saskatchewan, to Ivanhoe Lake. En route, aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances 13 km south of Ivanhoe Lake. SAR arrived on scene some 48 hours later. Aircraft was destroyed and pilot was killed.

Crash of a Douglas DC-3C in Yellowknife

Date & Time: Aug 19, 2013 at 1711 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GWIR
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Yellowknife - Hay River
MSN:
9371
YOM:
1943
Flight number:
BFL168
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
21
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 16, while climbing to a height of 800 feet, right engine fired. Crew elected to return and obtained permission to land on runway 10. He made a right turn and on final approach, while performing a last turn to the right at low altitude, aircraft hit tree tops and missed power cables. Aircraft eventually came down 100 meters short of runway 10 on its belly and came to rest into a ditch. All 24 occupants were uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan near Lutsel K'e: 2 killed

Date & Time: Oct 4, 2011 at 1140 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GATV
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Yellowknife - Lutsel K'e
MSN:
208-0308
YOM:
1992
Flight number:
8T200
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1950
Circumstances:
The Air Tindi Ltd. Cessna 208B Caravan departed Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, at 1103 Mountain Daylight Time under visual flight rules as regularly scheduled flight Air Tindi 200 (8T200) to Lutsel K'e, Northwest Territories. When the aircraft did not arrive at its scheduled time, a search was initiated, and the aircraft was found 26 nautical miles west of Lutsel K'e, near the crest of Pehtei Peninsula. The pilot and one passenger were fatally injured, and two passengers were seriously injured. There was no post-impact fire, and no emergency locator transmitter signal was received by the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre or search aircraft.
Probable cause:
Findings as to causes and contributing factors:
The aircraft was flown at low altitude into an area of low forward visibility during a day VFR flight, which prevented the pilot from seeing and avoiding terrain.
The concentrations of cannabinoids were sufficient to have caused impairment in pilot performance and decision-making on the accident flight.
Findings as to risk:
Installation instructions for the ELT did not provide a means of determining the necessary degree of strap tightness to prevent the ELT from being ejected from its mount during an accident. Resultant damages to the ELT and antenna connections could preclude transmission of an effective signal, affecting search and rescue of the aircraft and occupants.
Flying beyond gliding distance of land without personal floatation devices on board exposes the occupants to hypothermia and/or drowning in the event of a ditching.
Other findings:
Earlier on the day of the accident, the pilot flew the route from Fort Simpson to Yellowknife in cloud on a visual flight rules flight plan in controlled airspace.
With the ELT unable to transmit a useable signal, the SkyTrac system in C GATV was instrumental in locating the accident site. This reduced the search time, and allowed for timely rescue of the seriously injured survivors.
Final Report:

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter in Yellowknife: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 22, 2011 at 1318 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-GARW
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Thor Lake - Yellowknife
MSN:
367
YOM:
1973
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
5817
Captain / Total hours on type:
1037.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
570
Copilot / Total hours on type:
323
Aircraft flight hours:
33355
Circumstances:
The float-equipped de Havilland DHC-6-300 Twin Otter (registration C-GARW, serial number 367) was landing at the float-plane base (CEN9) located in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, along the western shore of Great Slave Lake, beside the area known as Old Town. There were 2 crew members and 7 passengers on board, and the first officer was the pilot flying. On touchdown, the aircraft bounced, porpoised and landed hard on the right float. The flight crew initiated a go-around; the aircraft lifted off at low speed in a nose-high, right-wing-low attitude, and it continued in a right turn towards the shore. As the turn continued, the aircraft’s right wing contacted power lines and cables before the float bottoms impacted the side of an office building. The aircraft then dropped to the ground on its nose and cart-wheeled into an adjacent parking lot. Both crew members were fatally injured, 4 passengers were seriously injured, and 3 passengers sustained minor injuries. The aircraft was substantially damaged. The 406-megahertz emergency locator transmitter activated. There was no fire. The accident occurred at 1318 Mountain Daylight Time.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
1. Airspeed fluctuations at touchdown, coupled with gusty wind conditions, caused a bounced landing.
2. Improper go-around techniques during the recovery from the bounced landing resulted in a loss of control.
3. It is possible that confused crew coordination during the attempted go-around contributed to the loss of control.
Final Report:

Crash of a BAe Jetstream 31 in Fort Smith

Date & Time: Nov 27, 2008 at 1515 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-FNAY
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Hay River - Fort Smith
MSN:
768
YOM:
1987
Flight number:
PLR734
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The Northwestern Air BAe Jetstream 31 was operating as PLR734 on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight from Hay River to Fort Smith, Northwest Territories. After conducting an IFR approach to Runway 11, PLR734 executed a missed approach and flew a full procedure approach for Runway 29. At approximately 0.2 nautical miles from the threshold, the crew sighted the approach strobe lights and continued for a landing. Prior to touchdown, the aircraft entered an aerodynamic stall and landed hard on the runway at 1515 mountain standard time. The aircraft remained on the runway despite the left main landing gear collapsing. The two flight crew members and three passengers were uninjured and evacuated the aircraft through the left main cabin door. There was no post-impact fire.
Probable cause:
Though icing conditions were encountered, the airframe de-icing boots were not cycled nor was the Vref speed increased to offset the effects of aircraft icing.
An abrupt change in aircraft configuration, which included a reduction in power to flight idle and the addition of 35° flap, caused the aircraft’s speed to rapidly decrease.
The aircraft entered an aerodynamic stall due to the decreased performance caused by the icing. There was insufficient altitude to recover the aircraft prior to impact with the runway.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas C-54 Skymaster in Norman Wells

Date & Time: Jan 5, 2006 at 1704 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GXKN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Norman Wells-Yellowknife
MSN:
36090
YOM:
1946
Flight number:
BFL1405
Country:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Aircraft left Norman Wells at 1652LT on a cargo flight to Yellowknife with a crew of four on board. Some six minutes after take off, while climbing, a fire erupted on engine number two. Crew tried to extinguished the fire without success. In the meantime, both propellers on engines number one and two feathered. Captain decided to perform an emergency landing in a snow covered field when fire extingued. He eventually decided to return to Norman Wells where an emergency landing was carried out. After touch down, aircraft veered off runway to the left and came to rest in a snowy field some 60 feet from runway edge. While all four occupants were uninjured, aircraft was considered as damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Engine fire on number two was caused by a fuel leak on a fuel line when fluid fired after contact with high temperature elements.
An Airworthiness Directive published in 1948 mandates the operator to replace the fuel line which was considered as potentially hazardous. Unfortunately, this fuel line was never replaced.
The primary engine fire emergency checklist was unefficient because the procedure to turn off the fuel selector was not required, which contributed to the length of the fire which burned for an extended period of time.