Mishap of a Fokker F27 Friendship 500F in Paris-Roissy-CDG

Date & Time: Oct 25, 2013 at 0120 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
I-MLVT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Paris - Dole
MSN:
10373
YOM:
1968
Flight number:
MNL5921
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crew was performing a night postal flight from Paris-Roissy-CDG Airport to Dole-Jura Airport on behalf of Europe Airpost. Shortly after take off, while climbing to 1,000 feet, left propeller detached and impacted the left part of the fuselage, causing a large hole. Crew declared an emergency and landed safely less than ten minutes later. Aircraft was parked on apron, both pilots were unhurt but aircraft was later considered as damaged beyond repair. The propeller was found in an open field in Mesnil-Amelot, near the airport. Nobody on ground was injured.
Probable cause:
The initial examinations of the propeller blade revealed a fatigue failure on the retaining bolt. Furthermore, the propeller blade, when passing through the airplane’s fuselage, cut the electrical power supply cables to the flight recorders. As a result, no data from the event was recorded after the cables were cut. More detailed examinations will be undertaken on the propeller blade.

Crash of a Beechcraft 1900C in Billings: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 23, 2008 at 0124 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N195GA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Billings - Great Falls
MSN:
UB-065
YOM:
1986
Flight number:
AIP5008
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4770
Captain / Total hours on type:
362.00
Aircraft flight hours:
34651
Circumstances:
About one minute after takeoff on a night Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) contract cargo flight, the tower controller advised the pilot that he was squawking the wrong transponder code. Although the pilot reset the transponder to the correct code, he was advised that he was still squawking the wrong code. He then realized that he had selected the wrong transponder, and then switched to the correct one. During the time the pilot was dealing with this issue, the airplane drifted about 30 degrees right of the assigned heading, but the pilot returned to the correct heading as he was contacting the departure controller. The departure controller cleared him to continue his climb and instructed him to turn left about 120 degrees, which he did. About 40 seconds after initiating his left turn of about 120 degrees, while climbing straight ahead through an altitude about 4,700 feet above ground level (AGL), the pilot was instructed to turn 20 degrees further left. Almost immediately thereafter, the airplane began turning to the right, and then suddenly entered a rapidly descending right turn. The airplane ultimately impacted the terrain in a nearly wings-level nose-down attitude of greater than 45 degrees. At the moment of impact the airplane was on a heading about 220 degrees to the right of the its last stabilized course. The investigation did not find any indication of an airframe, control system, or engine mechanical failure or malfunction that would have precluded normal flight, and no autopsy or toxicological information could be acquired due to the high amount of energy that was released when the airplane impacted the terrain. The determination of the initiating event that led to the uncontrolled descent into the terrain was not able to be determined.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain aircraft control during the initial climb for undetermined reasons.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 1900C in Lihue: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jan 14, 2008 at 0508 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N410UB
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Honolulu - Lihue
MSN:
UC-070
YOM:
1989
Flight number:
AIP253
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3098
Captain / Total hours on type:
1480.00
Aircraft flight hours:
19123
Circumstances:
The pilot was flying a night, single-pilot, cargo flight over water between two islands. He had routine contact with air traffic control, and was advised by the controller to maintain 6,000 feet at 0501 hours when the airplane was 11 miles from the destination airport. Two minutes later the flight was cleared for a visual approach to follow a preceding Boeing 737 and advised to switch to the common traffic advisory frequency at the airport. The destination airport was equipped with an air traffic control tower but it was closed overnight. The accident flight's radar-derived flight path showed that the pilot altered his flight course to the west, most likely for spacing from the airplane ahead, and descended into the water as he began a turn back toward the airport. The majority of the wreckage sank in 4,800 feet of water and was not recovered, so examinations and testing could not be performed. As a result, the functionality of the altitude and attitude instruments in the cockpit could not be determined. A performance study showed, however, that the airspeed, pitch, rates of descent, and bank angles of the airplane during the approach were within expected normal ranges, and the pilot did not make any transmissions during the approach that indicated he was having any problems. In fact, another cargo flight crew that landed just prior to the accident airplane and an airport employee reported that the pilot transmitted that he was landing on the active runway, and was 7 miles from landing. Radar data showed that when the airplane was 6.5 miles from the airport, at the location of the last recorded radar return, the radar target's mode C altitude report showed an altitude of minus 100 feet mean sea level. The pilot most likely descended into the ocean because he became spatially disoriented. Although visual meteorological conditions prevailed, no natural horizon and few external visual references were available during the visual approach. This increased the importance of monitoring flight instruments to maintain awareness of the airplane attitude and altitude. The pilot's tasks during the approach, however, included maintaining visual separation from the airplane ahead and lining up with the destination runway. These tasks required visual attention outside the cockpit. These competing tasks probably created shifting visual frames of reference, left the pilot vulnerable to common visual and vestibular illusions, and reduced his awareness of the airplane's attitude, altitude and trajectory.
Probable cause:
The pilot's spatial disorientation and loss of situational awareness. Contributing to the accident were the dark night and the task requirements of simultaneously monitoring the cockpit instruments and the other airplane.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208B Caravan in Bethel

Date & Time: Dec 18, 2007 at 0856 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N5187B
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Bethel - Hooper Bay - Scammon Bay
MSN:
208-0270
YOM:
1991
Flight number:
CIR218
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4054
Captain / Total hours on type:
190.00
Aircraft flight hours:
12204
Circumstances:
About 0800, the commercial pilot did a preflight inspection of the accident airplane, in preparation for a cargo flight. Dark night, visual meteorological conditions prevailed. He indicated that the weather conditions were clear and cold, and frost was on the airplane. He said the frost was not bonded to the skin of the airplane, and he was able to use a broom to clean off the frost, resulting in a clean wing and tail surface. He reported that no deicing fluid was applied. After takeoff, he retracted the flaps to about 5 degrees at 110 knots of airspeed. The airplane then rolled to the right about three times in a manner he described as a wave, or vortex-like movement. He applied left aileron and lowered the flaps to 20 degrees, but the roll to the right was more severe. The pilot said the engine power was "good." He then noticed that the airplane was descending toward the ground, so he attempted to put the flaps completely down. His next memory was being outside the airplane after it collided with the ground. The airplane's information manual contains several pages of limitations and warnings about departing with even small amounts of frost, ice, snow, or slush on the airplane, as it adversely affects the airplane's flight characteristics. The manufacturer requires a visual or tactile inspection of the wings, and horizontal stabilizer to ensure they are free of ice or frost if the outside air temperature is below 10 degrees C, (50 degrees F), and notes that a heated hangar or approved deicing fluids should be used to remove ice, snow and frost accumulations. The weather conditions included clear skies, and a temperature of -11 degrees F. Post accident examination of the airplane revealed no observed mechanical malfunction. An examination of the engine revealed internal over-temperature damage, and minor external fire damage consistent with a massive spike of fuel flow at the time of ground impact. Damage to the propeller blades was consistent with high power at the time of ground impact. The rolling/vortex motion of the airplane was consistent with airframe contamination due to frost.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to adequately remove frost contamination from the airplane, which resulted in a loss of control and subsequent collision with terrain during an emergency landing after takeoff.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Wetaskiwin

Date & Time: Jan 11, 2006 at 2045 LT
Registration:
C-FBBC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Vermilion-Wetaskiwin
MSN:
31-48
YOM:
1968
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Aircraft was landing on runway 30 at Wetaskiwin, following an IFR postal flight from Vermilion. During the landing, the crew lost sight of the runway in a thin layer of dense fog that covered the airport. They aborted the landing, and the aircraft settled into a field about ½ mile northwest of the airport. Both pilots sustained serious injuries and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. The flight crew used a cell phone to call for help. The emergency locator transmitter (ELT) activated during impact

Crash of a Let 410 in Iasi: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 27, 2005 at 1130 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HA-LAR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Budapest-Bucarest-Iasi
MSN:
87 19 23
YOM:
1987
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a mail flight from Baneasa to Iasi under contract to the National Romanian Postal Service. First approach was aborted and during the second attempt, the commuter hit the ground short of runway. Visibility was approximately 2 km at the time of accident due to snowfall. The aircraft was carrying 310 kilos of mail. For unknown reasons, crew was approaching too low.

Crash of an Embraer EMB-110 Bandeirante in Uberaba: 3 killed

Date & Time: Dec 11, 2004 at 1200 LT
Operator:
Registration:
PT-WAK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Sao Paulo - Uberaba
MSN:
110-071
YOM:
1975
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a mail flight on behalf of Total Linhas Aéreas from Sao Paulo-Guarulhos to Uberaba. On final approach by night, the aircraft crashed into houses located short of runway and burned. Both pilots and one person on ground were killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft 99 in Great Falls: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 17, 2004 at 2340 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N199GL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Billings-Kalispell
MSN:
U-015
YOM:
1968
Flight number:
AIP5071
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
15440
Captain / Total hours on type:
3000.00
Aircraft flight hours:
40521
Circumstances:
On a postal flight from Billings to Kalispell, the aircraft struck the side of the Big Baldy mountain around midnight. The aircraft was carrying 2,665 pounds of mail on behalf of the U.S. Postal Service. The weather was very bad at the time of the accident which occurred near Rhoda Lake.

Crash of a PZL-Mielec AN-28 in Tallinn: 2 killed

Date & Time: Feb 10, 2003 at 1942 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ES-NOY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tallinn-Helsinki
MSN:
1AJ006-04
YOM:
1989
Flight number:
ENI827
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Aircraft flight hours:
1428
Aircraft flight cycles:
2141
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff, the aircraft stalled and burst into flames in a wooded area near the airport. The engineer, the only survivor, reported that an engine failed after rotation.

Crash of an ATR42-312 in Brazil: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 14, 2002 at 0540 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PT-MTS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sao Paulo - Londrina
MSN:
026
YOM:
1986
Flight number:
TTL5561
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Aircraft flight hours:
33371
Aircraft flight cycles:
22922