code

AK

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver off Metlakatla: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 20, 2019 at 1600 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N67667
Survivors:
No
MSN:
1309
YOM:
1959
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Overturned and came to rest partially submerged while landing off Metlakatla harbor. Both occupants were killed.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-3T Otter in Coon Cove: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 13, 2019 at 1221 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N959PA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Ketchikan - Ketchikan
MSN:
159
YOM:
1956
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Ketchikan-Waterfront Seaplane Base in the morning on an on-demand sightseeing flight over the Misty Fjords, carrying 10 tourists who had been on a Royal Princess cruise ship that left Vancouver on May 11. While flying over the George Inlet at an altitude of 3,200 - 3,300 feet, after descending from 3,800 feet, the airplane collided with a Mountain Air Service De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver registered N952DB that was carrying five passengers and a pilot. The Beaver crashed into the sea and all five occupants were killed. On board the Otter, a passenger was killed while 10 other occupants were injured. At the time of the accident, sky was high overcast.

Crash of De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Coon Cove: 5 killed

Date & Time: May 13, 2019 at 1221 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N952DB
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Ketchikan - Ketchikan
MSN:
237
YOM:
1952
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Ketchikan-Waterfront Seaplane Base in the morning on an on-demand sightseeing flight over the Misty Fjords, carrying four tourists who had been on a Royal Princess cruise ship that left Vancouver on May 11. While flying over the George Inlet at an altitude of 3,200 - 3,300 feet, the airplane collided with a Taquan Air De Havilland DHC-3 Otter registered N959PA that was carrying 10 passengers and a pilot. The Beaver crashed into the sea and all five occupants were killed. On board the Otter, a passenger was killed while 10 other occupants were injured. At the time of the accident, sky was high overcast.

Crash of a Beechcraft B200 Super King Air off Kake: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 29, 2019 at 1811 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N13LY
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Anchorage - Kake
MSN:
BB-1718
YOM:
2000
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On January 29, 2019, about 1811 Alaska standard time, a twin-engine, turbine-powered Raytheon Aircraft Company (formerly Beech Aircraft Corporation) B200 airplane, N13LY, is presumed destroyed after impacting the waters of Frederick Sound following a loss of control while on approach to Kake Airport (PAFE), Kake, Alaska. The airplane was being operated by Guardian Flight as an instrument flight rules (IFR) air ambulance flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 when the accident occurred. The airline transport pilot, flight paramedic, and flight nurse who was 27 weeks pregnant are presumed fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the destination airport, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight departed Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (PANC), Anchorage, Alaska, about 1604 destined for PAFE. A preliminary review of archived voice communication information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) contained the following verbal exchange between the radar controller at Anchorage Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) and the accident flight as it maneuvered for the area navigation (RNAV) runway 11 approach to the airport: At 1806:07 ARTCC: "Medevac three lima yankee cross CEMGA at or above seven-thousand you're cleared for the RNAV runway 11 approach to Kake Airport." At 1806:11 N13LY: "CEMGA at or above seven-thousand cleared for the RNAV 11 for King Air three lima yankee." At 1807:43 N13LY: "Three lima yankee CEMGA inbound." At 1807:45 ARTCC: "Three lima yankee roger change to advisory frequency approved." At 1807:48 N13LY: "OK we're switching good day." There were no further communications with the accident flight. A preliminary review of archived FAA radar data revealed that the accident airplane crossed the CEMGA waypoint on the RNAV runway 11 approach at an altitude of about 7,000 ft above mean sea level (msl), then turned northeast and crossed the ZOLKO initial approach fix about 5,000 ft msl. The airplane then initiated a gradual descent and continued northeast toward the JOJOE intermediate fix. About 1810, while the flight was between ZOLKO and JOJOE, the airplane entered a right turn toward a southerly heading and began a rapid descent, losing about 2,575 ft of altitude in 14 seconds. The last radar data point was at 1810:36 when the airplane was at 1,300 ft msl and heading 143° with a ground speed of 174 knots.During a telephone conversation with the NTSB investigator-in-charge, a witness located at PAFE reported that she had driven up early to meet the airplane and observed that the pilot controlled runway lighting system illuminated about 1809. After about 10 minutes, when the airplane failed to arrive, she contacted Guardian Flight to inquire about the overdue airplane. An alert notice (ALNOT) was issued by the FAA at 1845, and an extensive search was launched. Search operations were conducted by personnel from the United States Coast Guard, Petersburg Search and Rescue, Alaska State Troopers, Kake Search and Rescue, Alaska Marine Highway Ferries, and numerous Good Samaritans. On January 30, airplane debris was located about 22 miles west of Kake floating on the surface of the water near Point Gardner in Chatham Strait. The airplane was equipped with a cockpit voice recorder (CVR) and a Dukane DK-100 underwater beacon. Search and recovery efforts continue, and a detailed wreckage examination and CVR audition is pending following recovery. The closest weather reporting facility is at PAFE, about 20 miles east of the presumed accident site. At 1756, a PAFE aviation routine weather report (METAR) reported wind from 100° at 6 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, light rain, broken clouds at 1,500 ft and 2,500 ft, overcast clouds at 5,500 ft, temperature 36° F, dew point 34° F, and altimeter 29.95 inHG.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver I on Mt Kahiltna: 5 killed

Date & Time: Aug 4, 2018 at 1753 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N323KT
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Talkeetna - Talkeetna
MSN:
1022
YOM:
1957
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
On August 4, 2018, about 1753 Alaska daylight time, a single-engine, DHC-2 Beaver airplane, N323KT, sustained substantial damage during an impact with steep, high altitude, snow-covered terrain about 50 miles northwest of Talkeetna, Alaska, in Denali National Park and Preserve. The airplane was registered to Rust Properties, LLC and operated by Rust's Flying Service Inc, doing business as K2 Aviation as a visual flight rules on-demand commercial air tour flight, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 when the accident occurred. The commercial pilot and four passengers sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight originated at the Talkeetna Airport (TKA) about 17:05. According to K2 Aviation, the purpose of the flight was to provide the four passengers a one-hour tour flight. This tour was to consist of an aerial tour of multiple glaciers, which included a flyover of the Denali Base Camp located on the Kahiltna Glacier, at 7,200 feet mean sea level (msl), and then return to Talkeetna. According to archived global positioning system (GPS) track data from K2 Aviation's in-flight tracking system, at 1746, as the flight passed over the Denali Base Camp, the airplane initially turns south, and travels down the Kahiltna Glacier. As the flight progressed southbound, it then turns to the left, and towards Talkeetna on a southeasterly heading. As the airplane continues on the southeasterly heading, the track terminates near a knife-edge ridge above the Kahiltna Glacier on Thunder Mountain. At 1753, the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) received the first alert from the accident airplane's 406 MHz emergency locator transmitter (ELT). At 1756, K2 Aviation was alerted that the accident airplane's satellite tracking had stopped moving, and lost aircraft procedures were immediately initiated. About 1800, a satellite phone call from the accident pilot was received by personnel at K2 Aviation. The pilot stated that they had impacted a mountain and needed rescue. The call only lasted a couple minutes before the connection was lost. After several attempts, contact was once again made with the accident pilot, and he stated that he was trapped in the wreckage and there were possibly two fatalities. No further information was received before the connection was once again lost. At 2008, the National Park Service (NPS) high altitude rescue helicopter based in Talkeetna, was dispatched to the coordinates transmitted from the accident airplane's 406 MHz ELT. However, due to continuous poor weather conditions in the area, the helicopter crew was not able to reach the accident site. Search and rescue assets from the National Park Service (NPS), the RCC, the Alaska Air National Guard, the Alaska Army National Guard and the U.S. Army joined in the search and rescue mission. On August 6, about 0717, the crew of the NPS's high altitude rescue helicopter located the airplane wreckage in an ice crevasse, at an altitude of about 10,920 ft msl, on a hanging glacier on Thunder Mountain, which is located about 14 miles southwest of the Denali Summit. The airplane was highly fragmented, and the right wing had separated and fallen several hundred feet below the main wreckage. Subsequently, an NPS mountain rescue ranger was able to access the accident site utilizing a technique known as a short-haul, which allows transport of rescue personnel to otherwise inaccessible sites while suspended beneath a helicopter using a long-line. Once on scene, and while still connected to the helicopter, the ranger was able to locate the deceased pilot and three of the passengers in the forward portion of the fuselage, but the fifth occupant was missing. The fuselage was fractured aft of the trailing edge of the wings, and the fuselage was splayed open with blown, packed snow inside. Rapidly deteriorating weather conditions limited the initial on-scene time to about five minutes. On August 10, NPS launched another short-haul site assessment mission. During this mission, the fifth occupant was located in the aft section of the fuselage and was confirmed deceased. According to NPS management personnel, given the unique challenges posed by the steepness of terrain, ice crevasses, avalanche danger, and the instability of the aircraft wreckage, it was determined that recovery of the occupants remains, and retrieval of the aircraft wreckage, exceed an acceptable level of risk and therefore a recovery will not be attempted.
Probable cause:
Loss of control for unknown reasons.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Willow Lake: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 18, 2018 at 1816 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N9878R
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Willow Lake - FBI Lake
MSN:
1135
YOM:
1958
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Willow Lake, en route to FBI Lake in the Skwentna area, the single engine lost height and crashed in flames in a wooded area. The pilot was killed while both passengers were injured. The aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-3T Otter on Mt Jumbo

Date & Time: Jul 10, 2018 at 0835 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N3952B
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
MSN:
225
YOM:
1957
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On July 10, 2018, about 0835 Alaska daylight time, a single-engine, turbine-powered, float equipped de Havilland DHC3T Otter airplane, N3952B, sustained substantial damage during an impact with rocky, mountainous, rising terrain about 9 miles west of Hydaburg, Alaska. The airplane was registered to Blue Aircraft, LLC and operated by Taquan Air as a visual flight rules (VFR) on-demand commercial flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 when the accident occurred. Of the 11 occupants on board, the airline transport pilot was uninjured, four passengers sustained minor injuries, and six passengers sustained serious injuries. Marginal visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight departed Steamboat Bay about 0747 destined for Ketchikan, Alaska. The area between Steamboat Bay and Ketchikan consists of remote inland fjords, coastal waterways, and steep mountainous terrain. During an initial telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on July 11, the accident pilot reported that while in level cruise flight at about 1,100 ft mean sea level (MSL), and as the flight progressed into an area known as Sulzer Portage, visibility decreased rapidly from about 3-5 miles to nil. In an attempt to turnaround and return to VFR conditions, he initiated a climbing right turn. Prior to completing the 180° right turn, he saw what he believed to be a body of water and he became momentarily disoriented, so he leveled the wings. Shortly thereafter, he realized that he airplane was approaching an area of snow-covered mountainous terrain, so he applied full power and initiated a steep, emergency climb to avoid rising terrain ahead. As the steep emergency climb continued, the airspeed decayed, and the airplane subsequently collided with an area of rocky, rising terrain. During the initial impact, the airplane's floats were sheared off. The airplane wreckage came to rest in an area known as Jumbo Mountain, sustaining substantial damage to wings and fuselage. The pilot stated that the Terrain Awareness and Warning System (TAWS) was in the inhibit mode at the time of the accident. According to the passenger seated in the right front seat, after departure, they proceeded to Klawock and then made what he perceived to be as a 180° turn. He said there were numerous course deviations as they maneuvered around weather, and at times all forward visibility was lost as they briefly flew in and out of the clouds. He said he became uncomfortable and was thinking it would be prudent to just land on the water. Shortly thereafter, he observed a large mountain loom directly in front of the airplane, knowing they could not out climb the mountain he presumed there must be a pass through the area. As they continued to approach the mountain they entered a cloud and he observed the pilot add power and pitch up, but the airplane impacted the side of the mountain. According to a second passenger seated towards the back of the airplane, the weather at Steamboat Bay when they departed was rain and low clouds. During the flight he could occasionally see the land and water below, but sometimes he could not. He said that there was consistent serious fog all around. After they passed Waterfall Resort he became very concerned that they were headed in the wrong direction. He texted the right front seat passenger (a friend) and asked him to ask the pilot to land and wait for the weather to improve. He said that he did not see the mountain until they were right on it, and observed the pilot add power right before impact. At 0843, the United States Coast Guard (USCG) Sector Juneau received a report from the Alaska State Troopers (AST) that a float plane had crashed near Sulzer Portage on Prince of Wales Island. Two MH-60J Sea Hawk helicopters were launched from USCG Air Station Sitka, and AST activated the Ketchikan Volunteer Rescue Squad (KVRS) and other rescue personnel utilizing Temsco Helicopters, Inc. of Ketchikan. Five helicopters were dispatched from Temsco to the search area and a staging area was established near the believed to be accident site. One of the helicopter pilots stated that he was unable to search the upper levels of the mountainous area due to a low cloud ceiling and poor visibility. After receiving word that the USCG was approaching the search area, he returned to the staging area. A "First Alert" was received from the accident airplane's onboard emergency locator transmitter (ELT) at 0911. About the same time, 911 dispatch in Ketchikan talked to a survivor who provided GPS position and elevation based on data from her iPhone. At 1047 both USCG helicopters arrived in the search area and one helicopter obtained a weak direction finding (DF) bearing from the ELT at the crash scene. The DF bearing, and the survivor's description of the accident area were used to direct search assets in close proximity to the accident site, so the survivors could hear the USCG helicopters. Two-way radio communications were established between the survivors and USCG by utilizing the accident airplane's radio. The USCG located the accident site at 1156. At 1308 all 11 survivors had been hoisted into the USCG's rescue helicopter and transferred to the staging area for transport back to Ketchikan by Temsco Helicopters. The accident site was located on a rock face on the east side of Jumbo Mountain at an elevation of about 2,557 ft msl. All the airplane major components were located at the accident site. The closest weather reporting facility was Hydaburg Seaplane Base (PAHY), Hydaburg, Alaska, about 9 miles west of the accident site. At 0847, an METAR from PAHY was reporting, in part: wind from 110° at 13 knots; visibility, 5 statute miles in light rain and mist; clouds and sky condition, few clouds at 900 ft, overcast clouds at 1,700 ft; temperature, 57° F; dew point 55° F; altimeter, 30.16 inches of mercury. A detailed wreckage examination is pending.

Crash of a Cessna 207 Skywagon into Susitna River: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2018 at 1205 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N91038
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
207-0027
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On June 13, 2018, about 1205 Alaska daylight time (AKD), a wheel-equipped Cessna 207 airplane, N91038, and a wheel-equipped Cessna 175 airplane, N9423B, collided midair near the mouth of the Big Susitna River, about 20 miles west of Anchorage, Alaska. The Cessna 207 was being operated as Flight 38 by Spernak Airways, Inc., Anchorage, as a visual flight rules (VFR) scheduled commuter flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135. The Cessna 175 was registered to and operated by the pilot as a VFR personal flight under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91. The commercial pilot of the Cessna 207 was fatally injured. The private pilot of the Cessna 175 was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area at the time of the accident. The Cessna 175 departed a remote fish camp about 1126 AKD en route to the Lake Hood Seaplane Base (PALH) with no flight plan filed. The Cessna 207 departed Merrill Field (PAMR), Anchorage, about 1200 with about 250 pounds of cargo on board, destined for Tyonek (TYE), Alaska, with company flight following procedures in effect. During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-incharge (IIC) on June 14, the pilot of the Cessna 175 stated that while in level cruise flight at an altitude of about 1,000 feet (ft) above mean sea level (msl), he began talking on the radio with the pilot of a Piper Super Cub, which was passing in the opposite direction, to maintain visual separation. He added that, as he watched the Piper Super Cub pass well below his airplane, he noticed the shadow of an opposite direction airplane converging with the shadow of his airplane. Alarmed, he looked forward and saw the spinner of a converging airplane in his windscreen, and he said that he immediately pulled aft on the control yoke. The pilot said that his airplane climbed abruptly just before the two airplanes collided. After the collision, the Cessna 207 descended uncontrolled into the Big Susitna River. He said that, after the collision, he assessed the condition of his airplane and circled over the wreckage of the downed Cessna 207 numerous times, looking for any survivors, marking the location, and using his radio to enlist the help of any pilots in the area. Realizing that no one had escaped the partially sunken wreckage of the Cessna 207, the pilot elected to return to PALH. He said that a Good Samaritan pilot in an airplane responded to his distress calls, flew alongside his damaged airplane, provided him with a damage report, and escorted him back to PALH. A second Good Samaritan pilot in a float-equipped airplane heard multiple distress calls and emergency personnel communications, landed on the river near the partially submerged wreckage, and confirmed that the pilot was deceased. The Cessna 175 pilot subsequently made an emergency landing on Runway 32 at PALH, a 2,200-ft-long, gravel-covered runway. Two NTSB investigators responded to PALH, talked with the Cessna 175 pilot, and examined the wreckage. The Cessna 175's left main landing gear and nosewheel were separated and missing. The right main landing gear tire was cut with features consistent with a propeller strike, and the outboard portion of the right elevator sustained impact damage with red paint transfer. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and right elevator. Due to the location of the wreckage of the Cessna 207 in the silt-laden waters of the Big Susitna River, the NTSB IIC was unable to examine the wreckage at the accident site. An aerial survey of the accident site, which was conducted from an Alaska State Troopers' helicopter, revealed that the wreckage was inverted and partially submerged near the mouth of the river. The left main tire and a portion of the fuselage were protruding from the water. The Cessna 175's left main gear leg with the wheel attached, as well as other wreckage debris, was found on the east bank of the river about 1,380 ft east of the Cessna 207's main wreckage. A preliminary review of archived Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) radar data revealed that, on June 13, about 1203 AKD, two unidentified targets, believed to be the accident airplanes, converged from opposite directions about 1,000 ft msl near the mouth of the river. The data showed that, about 1 minute before the presumed accident time, the westbound target, believed to be the Cessna 207, began a descent to about 874 ft msl then initiated a climb to an altitude of about 900 ft msl just before the targets appeared to merge. That airplane's track disappeared about 1205 AKD. The eastbound target, believed to be the Cessna 175, maintained an altitude of about 1,000 ft msl throughout the sequence. After the targets appeared to merge, the eastbound airplane initiated a climb, returned to the area near wherethe targets converged, and circled for some time before leaving the area. The closest weather reporting facility was at Anchorage International Airport (PANC), Anchorage, Alaska, about 20 miles east of the accident site. At 1153, a METAR from PANC reported, in part: wind from 290° at 5 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, few clouds at 4,500 ft, few clouds at 10,000 ft, scattered clouds at 20,000 ft; temperature, 55° F; dew point 43° F; altimeter, 29.91 inches of mercury. A detailed wreckage examination is pending following recovery.