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Crash of a Beechcraft 65-A90 King Air in Dillingham: 11 killed

Date & Time: Jun 21, 2019 at 1820 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N256TA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Dillingham - Dillingham
MSN:
LJ-256
YOM:
1967
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
11
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane was engaged in a sunset skydiving flight, carrying a pilot and 10 skydivers. While taking off from runway 08/26, the aircraft went out of control and crashed in flames along the perimeter fence. The aircraft was totally destroyed by impact forces and a post-crash fire and all 11 occupants were killed.

Crash of a Partenavia P.68 Observer in Panda Ranch

Date & Time: Feb 27, 2014 at 1947 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N947MZ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
316-12/OB
YOM:
1983
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4433
Captain / Total hours on type:
1716.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8831
Circumstances:
The pilot stated that the flight was conducted at night and he used his GPS track to align with the runway. When the pilot activated the runway lights, the airplane was about 1/4 mile to the left of the runway and 1/2 mile from the approach end. The pilot made an aggressive right turn then hard left turn to make the runway for landing. While maneuvering on short final, at 50 feet above ground level (agl), the airplane's right wing impacted the tops of a number of trees that lined the southeast side of the runway. The airplane descended rapidly and landed hard, collapsing the landing gear and spinning the airplane around 180 degrees laterally, where it came to rest against some trees. The right wing's impact with trees and the hard landing resulted in substantial damage. The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate decision to continue an unstable approach in dark night conditions, which resulted in a collision with trees and hard landing
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in Lanai: 3 killed

Date & Time: Feb 26, 2014 at 2130 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N483VA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lanai – Kahului
MSN:
31-7552124
YOM:
1975
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
4570
Aircraft flight hours:
12172
Circumstances:
The airplane departed during dark (moonless) night conditions over remote terrain with few ground-based light sources to provide visual cues. Weather reports indicated strong gusting wind from the northeast. According to a surviving passenger, shortly after takeoff, the pilot started a right turn; the bank angle continued to increase, and the airplane impacted terrain in a steep right bank. The accident site was about 1 mile from the airport at a location consistent with the airplane departing to the northeast and turning right about 180 degrees before ground impact. The operator's chief pilot reported that the pilot likely turned right after takeoff to fly direct to the navigational aid located southwest of the airport in order to escape the terrain induced turbulence (downdrafts) near the mountain range northeast of the airport. Examination of the airplane wreckage revealed damage and ground scars consistent with a high-energy, low-angle impact during a right turn. No evidence was found of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. It is likely that the pilot became spatially disoriented during the right turn. Although visual meteorological conditions prevailed, no natural horizon and few external visual references were available during the departure. This increased the importance for the pilot to monitor the airplane's flight instruments to maintain awareness of its attitude and altitude. During the turn, the pilot was likely performing the additional task of engaging the autopilot, which was located on the center console below the throttle quadrant. The combination of conducting a turn with few visual references in gusting wind conditions while engaging the autopilot left the pilot vulnerable to visual and vestibular illusions and reduced his awareness of the airplane's attitude, altitude, and trajectory. Based on toxicology findings, the pilot most likely had symptoms of an upper respiratory infection but the investigation was unable to determine what effects these symptoms may have had on his performance. A therapeutic level of doxylamine, a sedating antihistamine, was detected, and impairment by doxylamine most likely contributed to the development of spatial disorientation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's spatial disorientation while turning during flight in dark night conditions and terrain-induced turbulence, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's impairment from a sedating antihistamine.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan off Kalaupapa: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 11, 2013 at 1522 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N687MA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Kalaupapa - Honolulu
MSN:
208B-1002
YOM:
2002
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
16000
Captain / Total hours on type:
250.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4881
Circumstances:
The airline transport pilot was conducting an air taxi commuter flight between two Hawaiian islands with eight passengers on board. Several passengers stated that the pilot did not provide a safety briefing before the flight. One passenger stated that the pilot asked how many of the passengers had flown over that morning and then said, “you know the procedures.” The pilot reported that, shortly after takeoff and passing through about 500 ft over the water, he heard a loud “bang,” followed by a total loss of engine power. The pilot attempted to return to the airport; however, he realized that the airplane would not be able to reach land, and he subsequently ditched the airplane in the ocean. All of the passengers and the pilot exited the airplane uneventfully. One passenger swam to shore, and rescue personnel recovered the pilot and the other seven passengers from the water about 80 minutes after the ditching. However, one of these passengers died before the rescue personnel arrived. Postaccident examination of the recovered engine revealed that multiple compressor turbine (CT) blades were fractured and exhibited thermal damage. In addition, the CT shroud exhibited evidence of high-energy impact marks consistent with the liberation of one or more of the CT blades. The thermal damage to the CT blades likely occurred secondary to the initial blade fractures and resulted from a rapid increase in fuel flow by the engine fuel control in response to the sudden loss of compressor speed due to the blade fractures. The extent of the secondary thermal damage to the CT blades precluded a determination of the cause of the initial fractures. Review of airframe and engine logbooks revealed that, about 1 1/2 years before the accident, the engine had reached its manufacturer-recommended time between overhaul (TBO) of 3,600 hours; however, the operator obtained a factory-authorized, 200-hour TBO increase. Subsequently, at an engine total time since new of 3,752.3 hours, the engine was placed under the Maintenance on Reliable Engines (MORE) Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) inspection program, which allowed an immediate increase in the manufacturer recommended TBO from 3,600 to 8,000 hours. The MORE STC inspection program documents stated that the MORE STC was meant to supplement, not replace, the engine manufacturer’s Instructions for Continued Airworthiness and its maintenance program. Although the MORE STC inspection program required more frequent borescope inspections of the hot section, periodic inspections of the compressor and exhaust duct areas, and periodic power plant adjustment/tests, it did not require a compressor blade metallurgical evaluation of two compressor turbine blades; however, this evaluation was contained in the engine maintenance manual and an engine manufacturer service bulletin (SB). The review of the airframe and engine maintenance logbooks revealed no evidence that a compressor turbine metallurgical evaluation of two blades had been conducted. The operator reported that the combined guidance documentation was confusing, and, as a result, the operator did not think that the compressor turbine blade evaluation was necessary. It is likely that, if the SB had been complied with or specifically required as part of the MORE STC inspection program, possible metal creep or abnormalities in the turbine compressor blades might have been discovered and the accident prevented. The passenger who died before the first responders arrived was found wearing a partially inflated infant life vest. The autopsy of the passenger did not reveal any significant traumatic injuries, and the autopsy report noted that her cause of death was “acute cardiac arrhythmia due to hyperventilation.” Another passenger reported that he also inadvertently used an infant life vest, which he said seemed “small or tight” but “worked fine.” If the pilot had provided a safety briefing, as required by Federal Aviation Administration regulations, to the passengers that included the ditching procedures and location and usage of floatation equipment, the passengers might have been able to find and use the correct size floatation device.
Probable cause:
The loss of engine power due to the fracture of multiple blades on the compressor turbine wheel, which resulted in a ditching. The reason for the blade failures could not be determined due to secondary thermal damage to the blades.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 1900C in Lihue: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jan 14, 2008 at 0508 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N410UB
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Honolulu-Lihue
MSN:
UC-070
YOM:
1989
Flight number:
AIP253
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3098
Captain / Total hours on type:
1480.00
Aircraft flight hours:
19123

Crash of a Partenavia P.68 in Panda Ranch

Date & Time: Apr 30, 2006 at 2000 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N4574C
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Panda Ranch-Honolulu
MSN:
310
YOM:
1983
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2100
Captain / Total hours on type:
110.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1900
Circumstances:

On takeoff by night, the aircraft made a hard bank to the right and impacted terrain. When the airplane came to rest the engines were still running. Three passengers were slightly injured while another passenger and the pilot were seriously injured. The aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in Kahului: 3 killed

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2006 at 1913 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N5601C
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Honolulu-Kahului
MSN:
414-0113
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
3141
Aircraft flight hours:
8734
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was performing an ambulance flight from Honolulu to Kahului with one pilot and two nurses on board. On final approach, while flying at an altitude of 100 feet, the aircraft stalled and crashed on a BMW retailing center. All three occupants were killed.

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Kahului

Date & Time: Feb 18, 2004 at 1352 LT
Registration:
C-GPTE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Honolulu-Oakland-Brooks
MSN:
31-7712059
YOM:
1977
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:

The pilot was performing a ferry flight from Honolulu to Oakland, California, when flying 300 miles east of Honolulu, he reported that right engine failed. He diverted to Kahului airport but the twin engine aircraft struck the ground short of runway.

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in Hawaii: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 31, 2004 at 0140 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N5637C
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Honolulu-Hilo
MSN:
414-0118
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
8230
Captain / Total hours on type:
1037.00
Aircraft flight hours:
11899
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was performing an ambulance flight from Honolulu to Hilo to pick a patient with one pilot and 2 medical crew on board. While cruising at 3,600 feet, the aircraft struck trees and crashed in an euchalyptus forrest. Rescue teams arrived on the crash site on 02FEB and all occupants were killed.

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Hilo: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 25, 2000 at 1735 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N923BA
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Kailua-Kailua
MSN:
31-8252024
YOM:
1982
Flight number:
BIA057
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
2067
Captain / Total hours on type:
465.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3492