Crash of a Douglas DC-3C off Nassau

Date & Time: Oct 18, 2019 at 1645 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N437GB
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Miami - Nassau
MSN:
19999
YOM:
1944
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Following a uneventful cargo flight from Miami-Opa Locka Airport, the crew started the approach to Nassau-Lynden Pindling Airport. On final, the left engine failed for unknown reasons. The crew ditched the airplane about 2,5 nm short of runway 14 threshold. Royal Bahamian Defense Force were able to rescue both pilots reported to be in good health. The aircraft became submerged. Weather conditions at the time were visual meteorological conditions.

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Rock Sound: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jun 5, 2018 at 1500 LT
Registration:
N421MM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Rock Sound – Treasure Coast
MSN:
421B-0804
YOM:
1974
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
Less than two minutes after takeoff from Rock Sound Airport, while climbing, the twin engine airplane went out of control and crashed in flames in a wooded area located about 4 km from the airstrip. The airplane was totally destroyed by a post crash fire and all three occupants were killed.

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-40 Marquise off Eleuthera Island: 4 killed

Date & Time: May 15, 2017 at 1329 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N220N
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Aguadilla – Space Coast
MSN:
450
YOM:
1981
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
1483
Captain / Total hours on type:
100.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4634
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot and three passengers were making a personal cross-country flight over ocean waters in the MU-2B airplane. During cruise flight at flight level (FL) 240, the airplane maintained the same relative heading, airspeed, and altitude for about 2.5 hours before radar contact was lost. While the airplane was in flight, a significant meteorological information notice was issued that warned of frequent thunderstorms with tops to FL440 in the accident area at the accident time. Satellite imagery showed cloud tops in the area were up to FL400. Moderate or greater icing conditions and super cooled large drops (SLD) were likely near or over the accident area at the accident time. Although the wreckage was not located for examination, the loss of the airplane's radar target followed by the identification of debris and a fuel sheen on the water below the last radar target location suggests that the airplane entered an uncontrolled descent after encountering adverse weather and impacted the water. Before beginning training in the airplane about 4 months before the accident, the pilot had 21 hours of multi engine experience accumulated during sporadic flights over 9 years. Per a special federal aviation regulation, a pilot must complete specific ground and flight training and log a minimum of 100 flight hours as pilot-in-command (PIC) in multi engine airplanes before acting as PIC of a MU-2B airplane. Once the pilot began training in the airplane, he appeared to attempt to reach the 100-hour threshold quickly, flying about 50 hours in 1 month. These 50 hours included about 40 hours of long, cross-country flights that the flight instructor who was flying with the pilot described as "familiarization flights" for the pilot and "demonstration flights" for the airplane's owner. The pilot successfully completed the training required for the MU-2B, and at the time of the accident, he had accumulated an estimated 120 hours of multi engine flight experience of which 100 hours were in the MU-2B. Although an MU-2B instructor described the pilot as a good, attentive student, it cannot be determined if his training was ingrained enough for him to effectively apply it in an operational environment without an instructor present. Although available evidence about the pilot's activities suggested he may not have obtained adequate restorative sleep during the night before the accident, there was insufficient evidence to determine the extent to which fatigue played a role in his decision making or the sequence of events.The pilot's last known weather briefing occurred about 8 hours before the airplane departed, and it is not known if the pilot obtained any updated weather information before or during the flight. Sufficient weather information (including a hazardous weather advisory provided by an air traffic control broadcast message about 25 minutes before the accident) was available for the pilot to expect convective activity and the potential for icing along the accident flight's route; however, there is no evidence from the airplane's radar track or the pilot's communications with air traffic controllers that he recognized or attempted to avoid the convective conditions or exit icing conditions.
Probable cause:
The pilot's intentional flight into an area of known icing and convective thunderstorm activity, which resulted in a loss of control of the airplane.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain off Clifton Pier: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 2, 2014 at 0850 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C6-REV
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Governor’s Harbour – Nassau
MSN:
31-7652062
YOM:
1976
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft left Governor’s Harbour's Airport at 0820LT bound for Nassau-Lynden Pindling International Airport. While approaching his destination and flying along the west coast of New Providence Island, the pilot informed ATC about technical problems and told the passengers he was attempting to ditch the aircraft that crashed into the sea some 550 feet off Clifton Pier. A passenger aged 77 was killed while all ten other occupants were rescued.

Crash of a Learjet 35A in Freeport: 9 killed

Date & Time: Nov 9, 2014 at 1652 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N17UF
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Nassau - Freeport
MSN:
258
YOM:
1979
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Captain / Total flying hours:
13800
Copilot / Total flying hours:
996
Aircraft flight hours:
12046
Aircraft flight cycles:
10534
Circumstances:
The aircraft crashed into a garbage and metal recycling plant after striking a towering crane in the Grand Bahama Shipyard, while attempting a second landing approach to runway 06 at Freeport International Airport (MYGF), Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas. The aircraft made an initial ILS instrument approach to Runway 06 at the Freeport International Airport but due to poor visibility and rain at the decision height, the crew executed a go around procedure. The crew requested to hold at the published holding point at 2,000 feet while they waited for the weather to improve. Once cleared for the second ILS approach, the crew proceeded inbound from the holding location to intercept the localizer of the ILS system associated with the instrument approach. During the approach, the crew periodically reported their position to ATC, as the approach was not in a radar environment. The crew was given current weather conditions and advised that the conditions were again deteriorating. The crew continued their approach and descended visually while attempting to find the runway, until the aircraft struck the crane positioned at Dock #2 of the Shipyard at approximately 220 feet above sea level, some 3.2 nautical miles (nm) from the runway threshold. A fireball lasting approximately 3 seconds was observed as a result of the contact between the aircraft and the crane. The right outboard wing, right landing gear and right wingtip fuel tank, separated from the aircraft on impact. This resulted in the aircraft travelling out of control, some 1,578 feet (526 yards) before crashing inverted into a pile of garbage and other debris in the City Services Garbage and Metal Recycling Plant adjacent to the Grand Bahama Shipyard. Both crew and 7 passengers were fatally injured. No person on the ground was injured. The crane in the shipyard that was struck received minimal damages while the generator unit and other equipment in the recycling plant received extensive damages.
Probable cause:
The Air Accident Investigation & Prevention Unit (AAIPU) determines that the probable cause(s) of this accident were:
- The poor decision making of the crew in initiating and continuing a descent in IMC below the authorized altitude, without visual contact with the runway environment. Contributing Factors includes:
- Improper planning of the approach,
- Failure of the crew to follow the approved ILS approach while in IMC conditions,
- Insufficient horizontal or vertical situational awareness,
- Poor decision making,
- Deliberate actions of the crew by disabling the terrain alert warning system,
- Inadequate CRM practice.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 501 Citation I/SP in Stella Maris

Date & Time: Feb 15, 2014 at 1640 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GKPC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Lauderdale - Stella Maris
MSN:
501-0253
YOM:
1983
Country:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
4579
Circumstances:
The aircraft belly landed at Stella Maris-Estate Airport, Bahamas. No one was hurt but the aircraft was written off. Apparently, the approach checklist was interrupted by the crew for unknown reason and the landing procedure was performed with the landing gear still retracted. The aircraft was owned by the private Canadian company Kelly Panteluk Construction.

Crash of a Piper PA-46R-350T Malibu off Cat Cay

Date & Time: Aug 25, 2013 at 1406 LT
Registration:
N720JF
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cat Cay - Kendall-Miami
MSN:
46-92004
YOM:
2008
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
12250
Captain / Total hours on type:
210.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1000
Circumstances:
According to the pilot, he applied full power, set the flaps at 10 degrees, released the brakes, and, after reaching 80 knots, he rotated the airplane. The pilot further reported that the engine subsequently lost total power when the airplane was about 150 ft above ground level. The airplane then impacted water in a nose-down, right-wing-low attitude about 300 ft from the end of the runway. The pilot reported that he thought that the runway was 1,900 ft long; however, it was only 1,300 ft long. Review of the takeoff ground roll distance charts contained in the Pilot’s Operating Handbook (POH) revealed that, with flap settings of 0 and 20 degrees, the ground roll would have been 1,700 and 1,150 ft, respectively. Takeoff ground roll distances were not provided for use of 10 degrees of flaps; however, the POH stated that 10 degrees of flaps could be used. Although the distance was not specified, it is likely that the airplane would have required more than 1,300 ft for takeoff with 10 degrees of flaps. Examination of the engine revealed saltwater corrosion throughout it; however, this was likely due to the airplane’s submersion in water after the accident. No other mechanical malfunctions or abnormalities were noted. Examination of data extracted from the multifunction display (MFD) and primary flight display (PFD) revealed that the engine parameters were performing in the normal operating range until the end of the recordings. The data also indicated that, 7 seconds before the end of the recordings, the airplane pitched up from 0 to about 17 degrees and then rolled 17 degrees left wing down while continuing to pitch up to 20 degrees. The airplane then rolled 77 degrees right wing down and pitched down about 50 degrees. The highest airspeed recorded by the MFD and PFD was about 70 knots, which occurred about 1 second before the end of the recordings. The POH stated that, depending on the landing gear position, flap setting, and bank angle, the stall speed for the airplane would be between 65 and 71 knots. Based on the evidence, it is likely that the engine did not lose power as reported by the pilot. As the airplane approached the end of the runway and the pilot realized that it was not long enough for his planned takeoff, he attempted to lift off at an insufficient airspeed and at too high of a pitch angle, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall at a low altitude. If the pilot had known the actual runway length, he might have used a flap setting of 20 degrees, which would have provided sufficient distance for the takeoff.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s attempt to rotate the airplane before obtaining sufficient airspeed and his improper pitch control during takeoff, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle-of-attack and subsequently experiencing an aerodynamic stall at a low altitude. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s lack of awareness of the length of the runway, which led to his attempting to take off with the airplane improperly configured.
Final Report:

Crash of a Saab 340 in Marsh Harbour

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2013 at 1345 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C6-SBJ
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Lauderdale-Marsh Harbour
MSN:
316
YOM:
1992
Flight number:
SBM9561
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
18
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Approach seems to be performed in stormy weather. Aircraft landed hard and bounced three times according to passengers. On third touch down, right wing and right landing were sheared off. Aircraft veered off runway to the left and came to rest in a grassy area. All 21 occupants were uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Cessna 402C II in Mayaguana: 3 killed

Date & Time: Apr 4, 2013 at 0030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C6-BGJ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nassau - Mayaguana
MSN:
402-0106
YOM:
1979
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
Three people were killed when a charter plane collided with a vehicle on the airport runway in the neighboring Bahamian island of Mayaguana. Former MP Sidney Collie told The Nassau Guardian that his mother, Edith Collie, 81; his sister Enamae Collie, who is in her 30s, and her husband, Tim Polowick a Canadian, died in the accident. All were residents of Mayaguana. They were in one of two trucks providing light for the runway because a family member (Sidney Collie's uncle) needed to be airlifted to Nassau for medical reasons, according to Collie. Local night flying is banned on the smaller Family Islands, including Mayaguana, because airports do not have runway lights. Police said the pilot was trying to land with the light of headlamps from two trucks driven up to the runway. The plane's wing hit one truck and it spewed fuel as it spun into the second, which exploded, killing the Collies and Polowick. According to a preliminary report from the Department of Civil Aviation, at approximately 0030LT, a Cessna 402C owned by LeAir Charter Service Ltd with a crew of two on board was making a landing at night for an emergency evacuation flight with two vehicles strategically placed to outline the usable portion of the runway. The aircraft reportedly made contact with one of the vehicles, resulting in the deaths of the three passengers in that vehicle. Hanna-Martin said that an investigative team made up of the Royal Bahamas Police Force and the Air Accident Investigation and Prevention Unit of the Department of Civil Aviation was scheduled to fly into Mayaguana at 5 o'clock on Thursday morning.

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air A100 in Deadmans Cay

Date & Time: Mar 9, 2012 at 1410 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N70JL
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nassau - Deadmans Cay
MSN:
B-87
YOM:
1971
Country:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Aircraft was operating a charter flight from Nassau-Lynden Pindling Airport to Deadmans Cay and left Nassau around 1 PM. On approach, crew encountered technical problems and was unable to lower the gear. Captain eventually decided to perform a belly landing. Aircraft skidded on runway for several yards and veered off runway before coming to rest. While all occupants escaped uninjured, aircraft was damaged beyond repair.