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Crash of a Convair CV-440F in Toledo: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 11, 2019 at 0238 LT
Registration:
N24DR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Millington-Memphis - Toledo
MSN:
393
YOM:
1957
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The Convair, owned and operated by Douglas R. Taylor, departed Millington-Memphis Airport on a cargo flight to Toledo-Express Airport. On approach to runway 25, the airplane crashed in flames on a truck parking lot located about 3,000 feet from runway 25 threshold, to the left of its extended centerline. The aircraft was totally destroyed and both pilots were killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft E18S in Toledo: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jun 26, 1975 at 2228 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N791A
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Detroit - Louisville - Paducah
MSN:
BA-103
YOM:
1955
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
6062
Captain / Total hours on type:
2890.00
Circumstances:
While cruising by night on a cargo flight, the crew encountered technical problems and the copilot informed ATC about the failure of an engine. The crew was cleared to divert to Toledo-Express for an emergency landing when, on final approach, the airplane struck power cables and crashed in flames. The aircraft was destroyed and both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Powerplant failure following cylinder assembly failure. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Fatigue fracture,
- Improper maintenance,
- Unapproved modification,
- Oil exhaustion on engine lubrication system,
- Oil exhaustion on propeller system,
- Fatigue of the cylinder head,
- Standpipe cut off flush with bottom of oil tank.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft D18S in Toledo: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 8, 1971 at 0147 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N74D
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Paducah – Toledo – Detroit
MSN:
A-944
YOM:
1953
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
4000
Captain / Total hours on type:
1500.00
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a cargo flight from Paducah to Detroit with an intermediate stop at Toledo-Express Airport. During the last segment completed by night, due to an improper level off, the crew decided to perform a go-around. While climbing, the twin engine airplane went out of control and crashed in flames near the airport. The airplane was destroyed and both pilots were killed.
Probable cause:
Improper level off and inadequate preflight preparation on part of the crew. The following factors were reported:
- Improperly loaded aircraft, weight and CofG,
- Observers saw the aircraft pitch up to an excessive angle on go-around,
- CofG beyond aft limits approximately 5,47 inches.
Final Report:

Crash of a Curtiss C-46F-1-CU Commando in Toledo: 22 killed

Date & Time: Oct 29, 1960 at 2202 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N1244N
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Toledo – Kansas City – Albuquerque – Santa Maria – Oakland
MSN:
22458
YOM:
1945
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
45
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
22
Captain / Total flying hours:
6364
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3200
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1300
Circumstances:
The aircraft was chartered to transport the California State Polytechnic College football team from Santa Maria, California to Toledo, Ohio and return. The aircraft took off from Toledo Express Airport on the return flight to San Luis Obispo, California, weighing approximately 2,000 lb more than its maximum certificated gross weight of 47,100 lb. During initial climb, the airplane stalled and crashed in flames a field 1,1 mile past the runway end. Both pilots and 20 passengers, among them 16 members of the football team, were killed while 26 other occupants were injured. The aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
The accident was due to loss of control during a premature lift-off. Contributing factors were the overweight aircraft, weather conditions, and partial loss of power in the left engine.
Final Report: