Country
code

Gironde

Crash of a Cessna 421 Golden Eagle in Bordeaux: 3 killed

Date & Time: Feb 19, 2002 at 1815 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-GHUY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Artigues-de-Lussac-Toussus-le-Noble
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
1761
Copilot / Total flying hours:
552
Circumstances:

The aircraft crashed one minute after takeoff, in a wooded area located less than 2 km from airport. All three occupants were killed. Asymetrical thrust has been revealed by French investogators. Exact cause of this asymetrical thrust could not be determined.

Crash of an Embraer EMB-120 Brasília in Bordeaux: 16 killed

Date & Time: Dec 21, 1987 at 1510 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-GEGH
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Brussels - Bordeaux
MSN:
120-033
YOM:
1986
Flight number:
AF1919
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
13
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
16
Captain / Total flying hours:
2394
Captain / Total hours on type:
101.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1326
Copilot / Total hours on type:
215
Aircraft flight hours:
2505

Crash of a SNCAC NC.701 Martinet in Bordeaux: 5 killed

Date & Time: Apr 29, 1963
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
120
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
120
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
While taking off from Bordeaux-Mérignac Airport, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed. Two passengers were seriously injured while five other occupants were killed.

Crash of a Douglas A-26B-60-DL Invader in Bordeaux

Date & Time: Mar 4, 1963
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
44-35953/F-UIJA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Cazaux - Cazaux
MSN:
29232
YOM:
1944
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew departed Cazaux AFB for a combined exercise with two other Douglas A-26 Invader. The collision between the three aircraft occurred in unclear circumstances. While one crew was able to bail out before his plane crashed, both other airplanes crashed in a field, killing all seven crew members. All three airplanes were attached to the Groupe de Bombardement 2/91 Guyenne.

Crash of a Douglas A-26B-60-DL Invader in Bordeaux: 4 killed

Date & Time: Mar 4, 1963
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
44-35228/F-UIJZ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Cazaux - Cazaux
MSN:
28507
YOM:
1944
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The crew departed Cazaux AFB for a combined exercise with two other Douglas A-26 Invader. The collision between the three aircraft occurred in unclear circumstances. While one crew was able to bail out before his plane crashed, both other airplanes crashed in a field, killing all seven crew members. All three airplanes were attached to the Groupe de Bombardement 2/91 Guyenne.

Crash of a Douglas A-26B-60-DL Invader in Bordeaux: 3 killed

Date & Time: Mar 4, 1963
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
44-34521/F-UIWJ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Cazaux - Cazaux
MSN:
27800
YOM:
1944
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The crew departed Cazaux AFB for a combined exercise with two other Douglas A-26 Invader. The collision between the three aircraft occurred in unclear circumstances. While one crew was able to bail out before his plane crashed, both other airplanes crashed in a field, killing all seven crew members. All three airplanes were attached to the Groupe de Bombardement 2/91 Guyenne.

Crash of an Airspeed AS.10 Oxford in Bordeaux

Date & Time: Aug 14, 1961
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-ALTR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
4187
YOM:
1949
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Shortly after its takeoff from Bordeaux-Léognan-Saucats Aerodrome, the twin engine aircraft stalled and crashed in a field. All three occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was written off. The airplane was owned by Thomas Hutton Marshall.

Crash of a Douglas DC-7C in Bordeaux: 54 killed

Date & Time: Sep 24, 1959 at 2324 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-BIAP
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Paris – Bordeaux – Bamako – Abidjan
MSN:
45366
YOM:
1957
Flight number:
TAI307
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
9
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
56
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
54
Captain / Total flying hours:
11704
Captain / Total hours on type:
479.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
10829
Copilot / Total hours on type:
312
Aircraft flight hours:
5844
Circumstances:
Shortly after a night takeoff from runway 23 at Bordeaux-Mérignac Airport, the aircraft followed a straight-in path but failed to gain sufficient height. After a short course, while at an altitude of about 100 feet, the four engine aircraft struck pine trees, stalled and crashed in flames in a wooded area located 1,050 meters past the runway end. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all 9 crew members and 45 passengers were killed. Eleven passengers were seriously injured.
Probable cause:
The Board considered that the accident was probably caused by the most unfavorable combination of several of the following factors:
- Failure of one or more engine,
- Wrong maneuver of the undercarriage or flaps,
- Malfunction of the control systems,
- Incident in the cockpit,
- False indication on one or more instruments,
- Wrong indication of the artificial horizon,
- Failure of the anemometer,
- Incorrect altimeter setting,
- Error in the variometer.
The reconstructed flight showed that during the first segment of climbout and during a very short critical phase, a slight increase in speed will produce a considerable decrease in rate of climb or even a slight loss of altitude. In view of the rapid sequence of cockpit operations during this phase, together with the rapid variation in flight parameters, and the lack of precision - even inaccuracy - of readings of certain instruments, and lacking time reference and external visual references, a pilot may follow a line of flight that will bring the aircraft back near the ground if, during this period, optimum climbing speed is not maintained and the altimeter is not carefully watched.
Final Report: