Crash of a Tupolev TU-154B-2 in Surgut: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 1, 2011 at 1525 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RA-85588
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Surgut - Moscow
MSN:
83A588
YOM:
1983
Flight number:
KGL348
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
126
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
12202
Captain / Total hours on type:
2780.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3775
Copilot / Total hours on type:
3279
Aircraft flight hours:
32354
Aircraft flight cycles:
13147
Circumstances:
A fire erupted in a rear compartment while the aircraft was taxiing at Surgut airport, Khantia-Mansia okrug. Crew stopped the aircraft and started the evacuation. Three passengers died as the aircraft was totally destroyed by fire. Outside temperature was -29° C.
Probable cause:
A short circuit emerged while the aircraft generators were connected to the aircraft's electrical system after start-up of the engines, via an APU. The short circuit caused a strong fire in the generators compartment in the tail which spread rapidly through the fuselage. The cause of the fire was an electrical arc produced by electrical currents exceeding ten to twenty times the nominal loads when two generators not synchronized with each other were brought online but got connected together instead of being connected to parallel busses.
Final Report:

Crash of a Tupolev TU-154M in Moscow: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 4, 2010 at 1436 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RA-85744
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Moscow - Makhatchkala
MSN:
92A-927
YOM:
1992
Flight number:
DAG372
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
9
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
160
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
17384
Captain / Total hours on type:
10000.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3111
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1150
Aircraft flight hours:
9285
Aircraft flight cycles:
2983
Circumstances:
Daghestan Airlines (Avialinii Dagestana) flight DAG372 left Moscow-Vnukovo airport at 1408LT bound for Daghestan. Twelve minutes later, while cruising at 9,000 metres 80 kilometers south of Moscow, pilot informed ATC about engine problems and elected to return to Moscow. He was vectored to Domodedovo Airport but on final, aircraft went out of the cloud at a height of 500 feet and was not correctly positioned with the runway centerline. It touch down on the right of runway 32R, lost its undercarriage, slid for several yards before coming to rest, broken in two. Two passengers were killed while 78 were injured.
Probable cause:
Erroneous actions on part of the crew who, while landing in instrument meteorological conditions with one engine running, permitted the aircraft to touch down significantly to the right of the runway.
These actions were the result of following factors:
- the flight engineer inadvertently turned off the fuel booster pumps of the service tank while working the procedures for manual fuel transfer during the climb, which led to fuel starvation, all engines spooling down with the outer engines (#1 and #3) shutting down as well as loss of electrical power for 2:23 minutes due to loss of all three generators
- failure by the crew to take use of all available possibilities to restore on-board systems after generator #2 was recovered and the APU spooled up and was successfully connected
- failure to comply with recommendations "flying with two engines inoperative" and "approach and landing with two engines inoperative"
- lack of leadership and lack of management and distribution of responsibilities by the captain leading to independent but not always accurate actions by the other crew members as result of insufficient training in crew resource management
- a complex wind environment varying with heights which contributed to the deviation from the proper approach trajectory while the crew was flying on stand by instruments rather than regular instruments
- insufficient training of the crew as a whole as well as each individual to act in emergency and complex scenarios
- the non-implementation of safety recommendations developed in earlier investigations to prevent the flight engineer inadvertently turn off the fuel booster pumps.
Source : AvHerald
Final Report: