Crash of a Boeing B-17G-30-BO Flying Fortress in Windsor Locks: 7 killed

Date & Time: Oct 2, 2019 at 0955 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N93012
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Windsor Locks - Windsor Locks
MSN:
7023
YOM:
1942
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
On October 2, 2019, at 0953 eastern daylight time, a Boeing B-17G, N93012, owned and operated by the Collings Foundation, was destroyed during a precautionary landing and subsequent runway excursion at Bradley International Airport (BDL), Windsor Locks, Connecticut. The commercial pilot, airline transport pilot, and five passengers were fatally injured. The flight mechanic/loadmaster and four passengers were seriously injured, while one passenger and one person on the ground incurred minor injuries. The local commercial sightseeing flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, in accordance with a Living History Flight Experience exemption granted by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed BDL at 0947. On the morning of the accident flight, an airport lineman at BDL assisted the loadmaster as he added 160 gallons of 100LL aviation fuel to the accident airplane. The lineman stated that the accident airplane was the first to be fueled with 100LL fuel that day. According to preliminary air traffic control (ATC) data provided by the FAA, shortly after takeoff, at 0950, one of the pilots reported to ATC that he wanted to return to the airport. At that time, the airplane was about 500 ft above ground level (agl) on the right crosswind leg of the airport traffic pattern for runway 6. The approach controller verified the request and asked if the pilot required any assistance, to which he replied no. The controller then asked for the reason for the return to the airport, and the pilot replied that the airplane had a "rough mag" on the No. 4 engine. The controller then instructed the pilot to fly a right downwind leg for runway 6 and confirmed that the flight needed an immediate landing. He subsequently cancelled the approach of another airplane and advised the pilot to proceed however necessary to runway 6. The approach controller instructed the pilot to contact the tower controller, which he did. The tower controller reported that the wind was calm and cleared the flight to land on runway 6. The pilot acknowledged the landing clearance; at that time, the airplane was about 300 ft agl on a midfield right downwind leg for runway 6. The tower controller asked about the airplane's progress to the runway and the pilot replied that they were "getting there" and on the right downwind leg. No further communications were received from the accident airplane. Witness statements and airport surveillance video confirmed that the airplane struck approach lights about 1,000 ft prior to the runway, then contacted the ground about 500 ft prior to the runway before reaching runway 6. It then veered right off the runway before colliding with vehicles and a deicing fluid tank about 1,100 ft right of the center of the runway threshold. The wreckage came to rest upright and the majority of the cabin, cockpit, and right wing were consumed by postimpact fire. The landing gear was extended and measurement of the left and right wing flap jackscrews corresponded to a flaps retracted setting. The flap remained attached to the right wing and the aileron was consumed by fire. The flap and aileron remained attached to the left wing and a section of flap was consumed by fire. The empennage, elevator, and rudder remained intact. Control continuity was confirmed from the elevator, rudder, elevator trim, and rudder trim from each respective control surface to the area in the cabin consumed by fire, and then forward to the cockpit controls. Elevator trim and rudder trim cables were pulled during impact and their preimpact position on their respective drum at the control surfaces could not be determined. The left wing aileron trim tab remained intact and its pushrod was connected but bent. The left aileron bellcrank separated from the wing, but the aileron cables remained attached to it and the aileron cable remained attached in cockpit. The Nos. 1 and 2 engines remained partially attached to the left wing and all three propeller blades remained attached to each engine. One propeller blade attached to engine No. 1 exhibited an 8-inch tip separation; the separated section traveled about 700 ft before coming to rest near an airport building. Another propeller blade on the No. 1 engine exhibited chordwise scratching and leading edge gouging. The third propeller blade was bent aft. The No. 2 engine propeller blades exhibited leading edge gouges and chordwise scratches. The No. 3 engine was recovered from the top of the deicing tank. One blade was impact damaged and near the feather position. The other two blades appeared in a position between low pitch and feather. One propeller blade exhibited a 5-inch tip separation and the separated tip sections were recovered from 100 ft and 700 ft from the main wreckage. The No. 4 engine was recovered from the deice building. All three propeller blades on the No. 4 engine appeared in the feather position. The wreckage was retained for further examination. A fuel sample was able to be recovered from one of the No 3. engine's two fuel tanks. The recovered sample had a visual appearance and smell consistent with 100LL aviation fuel and was absent of debris or water contamination. Following the accident, the fuel truck used to service the airplane was quarantined and subsequent testing revealed no anomalies of the truck's equipment or fuel supply. Additionally, none of the airplanes serviced with fuel from the truck before or after the accident airplane, including another airplane operated by the Collings Foundation, reported any anomalies. The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, instrument airplane, and held a type rating for the B-17. In addition, he held a mechanic certificate with airframe and powerplant ratings. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on January 9, 2019. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 14,500 hours. The co-pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane, with type ratings for B-737, B-757, B-767, DC-10, and LR-Jet. In addition, he held a flight engineer certificate as well as a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on January 8, 2019. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 22,000 hours. The airplane was manufactured in 1944, issued a limited airworthiness certificate in 1994, and equipped with passenger seats in 1995. It was powered by four Wright R-1820-97, 1,200- horsepower engines, each equipped with a three-blade, constant-speed Hamilton Standard propeller. The airplane was maintained under an airworthiness inspection program, which incorporated an annual inspection, and 25-hour, 50-hour, 75-hour, and 100-hour progressive inspections. Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on January 16, 2019. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 11,120 total hours of operation. Engine Nos. 1, 2, and 3 had 0 hours since major overhaul at that time. Engine No. 4 had 838.2 hours since major overhaul at that time. The airplane's most recent progressive inspection, which was the 100-hour inspection, was completed on September 23, 2019. At that time, the airplane had been operated about 268 hours since the annual inspection. The recorded weather at BDL at 0951 included calm wind; 10 statute miles visibility; few clouds at 11,000 ft; few clouds at 14,000 ft; broken clouds at 18,000 ft; temperature 23°C; dew point 19°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.81 inches of mercury.

Crash of a Boeing 747-200 in Halifax: 7 killed

Date & Time: Oct 14, 2004 at 0356 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
9G-MKJ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Windsor Locks - Halifax - Zaragoza
MSN:
22170
YOM:
1980
Flight number:
MKA1602
Country:
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Captain / Total flying hours:
23200
Copilot / Total flying hours:
8537
Aircraft flight hours:
80619
Aircraft flight cycles:
16368
Circumstances:
On takeoff from runway 06 at Halifax international Airport, the aircraft did not rotate and overran the runway before crashing in a wooded area located after the airport. All 7 occupants were killed. The aircraft was carrying lawn tractors and 53 tons of lobster. It seems that the accident was caused by a tail strike during takeoff and that the crew lost the control of the aircraft on rotation.
Probable cause:
TSB determined that the accident was caused by crew miscalculation of engine thrust on takeoff.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan in Ontario: 10 killed

Date & Time: Jan 17, 2004 at 1638 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FAGA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Pelee Island-Windsor
MSN:
208-0658
YOM:
1998
Flight number:
GGN125
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
10
Captain / Total flying hours:
3465
Captain / Total hours on type:
957.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7809
Circumstances:
While climbing in bad weather conditions, the pilot sent a mayday message and the single engine aircraft crashed into Erie Lake. Freezing rain was falling at the time of the accident.

Crash of a Boeing 727-22QC in Windsor Locks

Date & Time: May 3, 1991 at 0553 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N425EX
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Windsor Locks - Boston
MSN:
19095
YOM:
1966
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
8500
Captain / Total hours on type:
3600.00
Aircraft flight hours:
46981
Circumstances:
N425EX was on the takeoff roll when the flightcrew experienced a 'thump' that resounded through the airplane. They also observed erratic engine indications from the n°3 engine. The captain aborted the takeoff and stopped the airplane on the runway. The fire warning system activated on the n°3 engine after the airplane came to rest. The crew attempted to extinguish the fire with the airplane's fire extinguishing system; however, they were unsuccessful. The post accident examination of the n°3 engine revealed the high pressure compressor disk had failed due to a fatigue crack that originated from a corrosion pit. The shrapnel from the disk penetrated the engine nacelle and severed the main fuel line for the engine. The fuel ignited and burned into the fuselage, igniting the 12,600 lbs of cargo (US Mail).
Probable cause:
A catastrophic and uncontained failure of the n°3 engine which resulted in a fuel fed fire.
Final Report:

Crash of a Learjet 23A in Windsor Locks: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jun 4, 1984 at 2341 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N101PP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Cleveland – Syracuse – Windsor Locks
MSN:
23-085
YOM:
1966
Flight number:
Night Air 4
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
11039
Captain / Total hours on type:
1130.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
5263
Copilot / Total hours on type:
189
Aircraft flight hours:
8393
Circumstances:
On June 4, 1984, an unmodified Gates Learjet 23A, N101PP, was being operated by Air Continental, Inc., Elyria, Ohio, on a regularly scheduled cargo flight transporting cancelled bank checks under 14 CFR 135. The flight departed Cleveland-Hopkins International Airport, Ohio, as Night Air 4 at 2200 eastern daylight time. After an uneventful flight, Night Air 4 arrived at Syracuse-Hancock International Airport, New York, at 2245. There was routine ground cargo handling at Syracuse; the airplane was not refueled. Night Air 4 departed Syracuse at 2311, was cleared to climb to 17,000 feet, and was handed off to Boston Air Route Traffic Control Center (Boston Center) at 2314. Boston Center cleared Night Air 4 to its requested altitude of FL290 and the en route portion of the flight was uneventful. At 2332, Night Air 4 was handed off at 16,000 feet during its descent to Bradley International Airport, Windsor Locks, Connecticut Approach Control. Approach control identified the airplane, cleared it for a visual approach to runway 33, and at 2336 gave Night Air 4 a turn to position the airplane on final approach at 10 miles from the airport. At 2338:22, Night Air 4 reported that the airplane was on final approach for runway 33, and at 2338:25 the air traffic control tower operator cleared the flight to land. At 2341:18, the control tower operator reported to approach control that there had been an accident at the airport. Fifteen witnesses, who either heard and/or saw the accident, were interviewed, and with the exception of a few minor points, all of the witnesses described basically the same accident sequence. The airplane was on a normal approach to runway 33 with no apparent abnormalities. When the airplane was about 200 feet over the approach lights, an increase in engine thrust was heard and the airplane halted its rate of descent in what two pilot witnesses thought was an apparent attempt to go-around. Immediately afterward, Night Air 4 began what appeared to be a level turn to the right. As the airplane went through about 90° of turn, the wings of the aircraft were nearly vertical to the ground. The airplane's nose dropped below the horizon and the airplane descended into the ground in a nose low attitude. The witnesses stated that they saw an explosion which was followed by intense ground fire. None of the witnesses reported any significant lateral or vertical changes while the aircraft was on short final or during the 90' right turn prior to its descent into the ground. Many witnesses stated that they saw some lights illuminated on the aircraft but none reported seeing the landing lights, located on the landing gear, or the landing gear in the extended position. Witnesses reported no inflight fire, smoke, or airframe separation before the crash. All three occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
An uncommanded roll to the right which caused the airplane to roll about 90°and descend into the ground. The cause of the uncommanded roll was an asymmetric retraction of the flight spoilers wherein the left spoiler retracted and the right spoiler did not. The Safety Board could not determine the reason for the right spoiler malfunction.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-60 Marquise near Burlington: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 19, 1984 at 2022 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N466MA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Burlington - Windsor Locks
MSN:
1540
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
5700
Captain / Total hours on type:
3200.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7890
Circumstances:
The aircraft was flown earlier in the day for a sales demonstration. On the return flight, when the landing gear were lowered, the pilot thought he heard a noise emitting from the gear, although cockpit indications were normal. The aircraft landed at Johnny Cake Airport and was refueled for a flight to Bradley Field where it is hangared. The pilot stated he intended to make the 22 miles flight with the gear down as a precaution. He also stated his intention to fly below the overcast because of delays of up to 45 minutes in obtaining IFR clearances. Moments after takeoff the aircraft collided with trees east of the airport. About one mile east of the airport is a north-south ridge. Another pilot, who departed 15-20 mins earlier, reported entering the overcast between 400 and 700 feet agl. Ground witnesses one mile southeast of the airport who heard the crash described the weather as heavy fog and mist. One witness estimated the ceiling as 100 feet agl. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight encounter with weather
Phase of operation: cruise
Findings
1. (f) weather condition - low ceiling
2. (c) VFR flight into imc - initiated - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: in flight collision with object
Phase of operation: cruise
Findings
3. (f) object - tree(s)
4. (c) altitude - inadequate - pilot in command
5. (f) light condition - dark night
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft E18S in Windsor Locks: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 19, 1979 at 0404 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N705M
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Windsor Locks – Baltimore
MSN:
BA-353
YOM:
1958
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
6425
Captain / Total hours on type:
125.00
Circumstances:
Shortly after a night takeoff from Windsor Locks-Bradley Airport, while on a cargo flight to Baltimore, the twin engine airplane stalled and crashed in flames. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
Uncontrolled collision with ground during initial climb following an inadequate preflight preparation. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Cargo shifted after rotation,
- Improperly loaded aircraft,
- Tie-down snaps, rings found disconnected,
- Aircraft 682 pounds over max gross weight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft E18S in Albany

Date & Time: Sep 1, 1978 at 2046 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N58H
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Albany – Windsor Locks
MSN:
BA-250
YOM:
1957
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4618
Captain / Total hours on type:
214.00
Circumstances:
After takeoff from Albany Airport, while in initial climb, the left engine failed. The airplane lost height then struck the ground and crashed near the airport. The pilot, sole on board, was slightly injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
Engine failure during initial climb for undetermined reasons. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Failed to follow approved procedures,
- Improper emergency procedures,
- Forced landing off airport on land,
- Failed engine not feathered.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-26A near Manchester: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 28, 1978 at 1317 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N765MA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Manchester - Windsor Locks
MSN:
372
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
15679
Captain / Total hours on type:
50.00
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Manchester Airport, while climbing, the crew reported compass problem when the airplane entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed in Bedford, about four miles west of the airport. The aircraft was destroyed and both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Uncontrolled descent and subsequent crash after the crew diverted attention from operation of aircraft. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Flight and navigation instruments: other,
- Low ceiling,
- Visibility 4 miles or less.
Final Report: