Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain near Saint Petersburg

Date & Time: Aug 31, 1984
Operator:
Registration:
N4469R
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
31-8152120
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The pilot, sole on board, was completing an illegal flight and attempted to land in a remote area near St Petersburg when the aircraft crash landed in unclear circumstances. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot was not found.

Crash of a Douglas C-118A Liftmaster in San Manuel

Date & Time: Apr 28, 1984 at 1630 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N92860
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saint Petersburg – Chandler
MSN:
44619/549
YOM:
1955
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6983
Captain / Total hours on type:
3200.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft skidded off the departure end of the runway collapsing the landing gear in a ditch as it caught on fire. This aircraft was on a ferry flight and had several mechanical problems. Among these was the prop reversers which failed on landing. The anti-ice/de-ice systems failed to work properly which contributed to the need to land short of destination. The copilot reported that she did not check the anti-icing equipment on pre-flight. She was also not qualified to be a copilot on this flight. The airspeed indicators were malfunctioning during landing. The crew members all said that they knew the airspeed was much too high. The copilot said she could not understand how the pilot thought he could land at such a high speed. She also said he called for reverse and applied brakes too late in the rollout.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: overrun
Phase of operation: landing - roll
Findings
1. (f) weather condition - tailwind
2. (c) wrong runway - selected - pilot in command
3. (f) pressure induced by others - pilot in command
4. (f) propeller system/accessories,reversing system - failure,partial
5. (c) airspeed - excessive - pilot in command
6. (f) anti-ice/deice system,windshield - inoperative
7. (c) proper touchdown point - not attained - pilot in command
8. (c) operation with known deficiencies in equipment - performed - pilot in command
9. (f) precautionary landing - premature - pilot in command
10. (c) judgment - poor - pilot in command
11. (f) procedures/directives - not followed - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: main gear collapsed
Phase of operation: landing - roll
Findings
12. (f) landing gear, main gear - overload
Final Report:

Crash of a Convair CV-240-8 in Clewiston: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 4, 1978 at 1130 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N7177B
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Clewiston - St Petersburg
MSN:
38
YOM:
1949
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Clewiston Airport, on a positioning flight to St Petersburg, the crew reported engine problems and elected to return for an emergency landing when the airplane went out of control and crashed in flames near the airport. The aircraft was destroyed and both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Uncontrolled collision with ground during initial climb due to engine failure. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Inadequate preflight preparation,
- Water in fuel,
- lack of familiarity with aircraft,
- Poor judgment on part of the pilot-in-command,
- The pilot was not type rated in Convair 240.
- ELT not found.
Final Report:

Crash of a Curtiss C-46F-1-CU Commando off Aguadilla

Date & Time: Aug 8, 1975 at 1530 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N4873V
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saint Petersburg - Aguadilla
MSN:
22415
YOM:
1945
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
22000
Captain / Total hours on type:
11100.00
Circumstances:
The airplane was completing a cargo flight from St Petersburg to Aguadilla, carrying two pilots and a load of 9,000 lbs of dynamite. While approaching Aguadilla, both engines lost power and stopped almost simultaneously. The crew elected to ditch the aircraft that crashed into the sea about 800 meters offshore. The airplane sank by 50 feet of water and its wreckage was not recovered. Both pilots, slightly injured, were evacuated.
Probable cause:
Double engine failure caused by a fuel exhaustion. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Inadequate preflight preparation,
- Improper in-flight decisions por planning,
- Mismanagement of fuel,
- Fuel exhaustion.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation in Tamarac

Date & Time: Aug 5, 1973 at 1925 LT
Registration:
N6202C
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Freeport - Saint Petersburg
MSN:
4002
YOM:
1952
Location:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
17000
Captain / Total hours on type:
3000.00
Circumstances:
On a positioning flight from Freeport to St Petersburg, the crew was trying to transfer fuel when all four engines stopped simultaneously. The captain reduced his altitude and attempt an emergency belly landing in a open field located in Tamarac. The airplane slid on its belly for few dozen yards before coming to rest. While all eight occupants escaped uninjured, the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Engine failure in flight caused by inadequate supervision of flight and improper use of equipment. The following factors were reported:
- Fuel starvation,
- Improper emergency procedures,
- Intentional wheels-up landing,
- Inadequate inspection of aircraft on part of the maintenance personnel,
- Failure of the fuel system: pumps as the protective devices were corroded,
- Inadequate preflight preparation,
- Improper transfer of fuel,
- Circuit breaker corroded.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-310 Navajo Chieftain in Tallahassee

Date & Time: Apr 14, 1970 at 0115 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N411AA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saint Petersburg – Tallahassee
MSN:
31-24
YOM:
1967
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
10245
Captain / Total hours on type:
220.00
Circumstances:
On final approach to Tallahassee Airport by night, the pilot failed to realize his altitude was insufficient when the airplane struck tree tops and crashed few hundred yards short of runway threshold. All four occupants were seriously injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
Improper IFR operation on part of the pilot-in-command.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed 18-56-23 LodeStar in Golden Gate

Date & Time: Oct 16, 1969 at 0835 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N170L
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Miami-Opa Locka – St Petersburg
MSN:
2534
YOM:
1943
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
31000
Captain / Total hours on type:
2000.00
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a ferry flight from Miami-Opa Locka Airport to a maintenance facility based in St Petersburg. This was the first flight for maintenance. En route, smoke spread in the cockpit and the crew was forced to reduce his altitude and to attempt an emergency landing. The aircraft crash landed in flames in a prairie located in Golden Gate, northeast of Naples.
Probable cause:
In-flight fire and smoke forced the crew to attempt an emergency landing. Fuel leak from undetermined source. Fumes in cabin. The aircraft exploded on ground.
Final Report:

Ground accident of a Lockheed C-130E Hercules in St Petersburg

Date & Time: May 30, 1969
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
62-1831
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
3794
YOM:
1963
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Suffered a ground accident at St Petersburg Airport. No casualties.

Crash of a Lockheed 18-50 LodeStar in St Petersburg

Date & Time: Jan 10, 1955 at 0938 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N33369
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Orlando – Lakeland – Tampa – Saint Petersburg – Sarasota – Fort Myers – West Palm Beach – Miami
MSN:
2414
YOM:
1943
Flight number:
NA001
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
13427
Captain / Total hours on type:
410.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3639
Copilot / Total hours on type:
43
Aircraft flight hours:
20627
Circumstances:
After a normal run-up the copilot taxied the aircraft to the end of the 5,010-foot runway. The aircraft was then lined up with the runway slightly to the right of the centerline, the tail wheel was locked, and power was applied. As the aircraft progressed down the runway the tail came up and the copilot applied forward pressure to the control column. Shortly thereafter the airplane began to swerve to the left and when this was corrected it went too far to the right. A series of over-corrections followed which resulted in several swerves in both directions. As these maneuvers began the crew noted a five-inch drop in the manifold pressure of the left engine. At a speed of approximately 80 knots the aircraft again began turning to the left. The captain immediately took over the controls when he noticed a second drop of 25 inches in manifold pressure of the same engine. Both throttles were closed at once and he tried unsuccessfully to stop the turn. The turn developed into a skid and the main landing gear of the aircraft collapsed, rupturing the right wing fuel tank. The airplane cam to rest on the sodded area, off the runway, heading 180 degrees from its original takeoff position. Fire immediately occurred near the right engine nacelle. Under the supervision of the stewardess all passengers left the aircraft in a rapid, orderly manner through the main cabin door. The pilots left through the cockpit windows. The captain and copilot entered the cabin and made a recheck after all passengers were reported out and away from the aircraft. Local weather conditions at the time were: Ceiling 30,000 feet scattered, 600 feet scattered, visibility 12 miles, temperature 70, dewpoint 67, wind south 7. Atmospheric conditions were not conducive to carburetor ice.
Probable cause:
The Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was the copilot's loss of directional control during the takeoff run and the inability of the captain to regain control of the aircraft, the latter possibly due to failure of the pedal mechanism. The following findings were reported:
- Directional control was lost in the takeoff run which resulted in a violent groundloop off the runway,
- There is no evidence indicating that structural failure or malfunction of controls occurred. However, there exists the indeterminable possibility that during takeoff run there was a failure of the pedal assembly,
- Subsequent engine tests gave no evidence of other than normal operation of the left engine. The right engine operated normally throughout the attempted takeoff.
Final Report:

Crash of a Curtiss C-46A-50-CU Commando in Saint Petersburg

Date & Time: Mar 20, 1953
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N66559
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tampa – Guatemala City
MSN:
30504
YOM:
1944
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
After takeoff from Tampa Airport, on a cargo flight to Guatemala City, the crew encountered engine problems en decided to divers to St Peterburg Airport where a safe landing was completed. Technicians proceeded to several controls on both engines and nothing abnormal was reported, so the crew left St Petersburg. Shortly after takeoff, ATC reported to the crew that white smoke was spreading from the right engine. In such conditions, the crew obtained the permission to return for an emergency landing, shut down the engine and feathered the propeller. For unknown reason, the aircraft missed the runway and flew over its entire length without landing. In such situation, the pilot-in-command decided to make a go around when the airplane stalled and crashed. The aircraft was destroyed and all three occupants were injured.
Probable cause:
Failure of the right engine for unknown reason. The aircraft then stalled due to one engine inoperative and while the flaps were fully deployed, which was considered as a contributory factor.