code

North Central Province

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter 300 in Male

Date & Time: Oct 4, 2017 at 1616 LT
Operator:
Registration:
8Q-ISB
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dhaalu Atoll - Male
MSN:
655
YOM:
29
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
14
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Upon landing in the seaplane base of Male-Velana Intl Airport, the airplane struck the water surface, came to rest upside down and sank few meters from the shore. All 17 occupants were rescued while the airplane seems to be written off. At the time of the accident, weather conditions were poor with cumulonimbus and rain falls.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter 300 off Kuredu Island

Date & Time: Jul 2, 2015 at 1709 LT
Operator:
Registration:
8Q-MAN
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Male - Kuredu Island
MSN:
435
YOM:
1974
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft left the Male seaplane base at 1633 on a schedule flight to the Kuredu Island. While landing some 3 km off shore, the aircraft overturned and sunk. While all 14 occupants were quickly rescued, the aircraft was lost.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter in Halaveli

Date & Time: Jun 2, 2009 at 1009 LT
Operator:
Registration:
8Q-MAG
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Malé-Halaveli
MSN:
224
YOM:
1969
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3556
Captain / Total hours on type:
3240.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1974
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1688
Aircraft flight hours:
33685
Circumstances:
After a air-to-air photo mission, the crew returned to Halavelhi Resort lagoon. On landing, the aircraft flipped over and came to rest few metres off shore. All 7 occupants escaped with minor injuries but the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
It was observed by the investigation team that;
• The PIC was conducting flying activities (photographic activities) lower than that allowed in regulations and company operations manual and standard operating procedures.
• At the time of accident a passenger was occupying the co-pilot seat.
• PIC could not make a fair judgment of the aircraft altitude by looking outside since the aircraft was banking to the right for a turn and the co-pilot seat was occupied by a passenger.
• The crew of the aircraft acted swiftly to save lives, after the aircraft came to a halt.
• Investigation revealed that the right float forward and both wingtips were severely damaged. Since the aircraft was right banked at the impact it was evident that the right wing and/or float were the
first to impact with the water.
Final Report:

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter in North Ari Atoll

Date & Time: Jul 14, 2008 at 1230 LT
Operator:
Registration:
8Q-MAS
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Male - North Ari Atoll
MSN:
445
YOM:
1975
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
14
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3150
Captain / Total hours on type:
430.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2880
Copilot / Total hours on type:
127
Aircraft flight hours:
49129
Circumstances:
On landing near North Ari Atoll, the float equipped aircraft hit a boat with its right float. The aircraft sunk but all 17 occupants escaped uninjured. According to Maldivian Accident Investigation & Coordinating Committee, it appeared that the weather conditions were not good upon arrival : wind 330° at 26 knots, visibility 6 km and rain showers. The aircraft was not able to do a safe go around due to the obstacle (boat); no publication has been issued by Civil Aviation Department (CAD) establishing a safe zone or obstacle free zone for takeoff or rejected landing; the pilot in command (PIC) did not take into consideration the obstacles in the landing area for a missed approach or rejected landing; no operational guidelines by Maldivian Air Taxi (MAT) or a regulation by CAD has been issued on rough water operations of sea plane and no warning or caution signs evident on the floating platform indicating for general public that the area or the platform is for sea plane operational purpose only.
Final Report:

Crash of a Dornier DO228-212K in Male

Date & Time: Oct 18, 1995 at 0946 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
9M-PEQ
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Kadhdhoo - Male
MSN:
8213
YOM:
1992
Flight number:
AMI3312
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3152
Captain / Total hours on type:
2948.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
226
Copilot / Total hours on type:
61
Aircraft flight hours:
3857
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful flight from Kadhdhoo Airport, the crew initiated the approach to Male Intl Airport. The copilot was the pilot-in-command. The aircraft landed on runway 36 at the speed of 95 knots some 600 metres past the runway threshold. After touchdown, the aircraft deviated from the centerline to the left and the copilot overcorrected, causing the aircraft to veer to the right. The captain took over control but this was too late. The aircraft overran, struck a concrete wall and crashed in the sea. All eight occupants were injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
The following factors were reported:
- Failure of the PIC to take control when the aircraft touched at 20° angle to the centreline and continued towards the western edge of the runway after landing,
- The "over correction" applied by the handling pilot to the prevalent crosswind, leading the aircraft to land at 20° to the centreline,
- The over application of right rudder to get the aircraft onto centreline and subsequently failing to get the power levers to ground idle,
- The lack of a CRM programme in the company had meant that the pilots albeit friendly, did not have an harmonious attitude towards one another; particularly the captain to the copilot,
- The less than effective means of imparting company policy with respect to giving copilots (based on experience, flight conditions) to carry out landings/take-offs.