Crash of a Grumman G-21A Goose into the Río Villano

Date & Time: Feb 17, 1949
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HC-SBB
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
MSN:
1005
YOM:
1937
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crashed in unknown circumstances into the Río Villano, affluent of the Río Curaray. The seaplane was destroyed and both crew members were injured.

Crash of a Junkers W.34hi in Puerto Boy

Date & Time: Feb 15, 1949
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
404
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Puerto Leguizamo – Tres Esquinas
MSN:
2761
YOM:
1934
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
En route, the engine failed, forcing the pilot to attempt an emergency landing near Puerto Boy, Putumayo. The aircraft was found few hours later and all four occupants (three crew members and a woman passenger) were injured and rescued.
Probable cause:
Engine failure.

Crash of a Douglas DC-3 in Paiyang

Date & Time: Feb 10, 1949
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
XT-T72
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Chongqing – Guiyang
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
En route, the crew encountered an unexpected situation and was forced to attempt an emergency landing. The aircraft crash landed in a paddy field and was damaged beyond repair. There were no casualties.

Crash of a Junkers JU.52/3m in Beloyarsk: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 7, 1949 at 1042 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
CCCP-I511
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Verkhnyaya Salda – Oufa
MSN:
7658
YOM:
1942
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Aircraft flight hours:
3325
Circumstances:
The crew left Verknyaya Salda in the morning on a cargo flight to Ufa. En route, he encountered poor weather conditions and the visibility was reduced by snow falls. As the crew did not have the appropriate charts for the region, he obtained the assistance of the ATC and was vectored to Tyumen Airport. Few minutes later, while cruising at an assigned altitude of 2,100 meters, the central engine lost power and failed. Shortly later, both other engines (left and right) lost power and produced black smoke. In such conditions, the crew was unable to maintain a safe altitude and the captain decided to make an emergency landing. The aircraft hit tree tops and crashed in a wooded area located 14 km north of Mezenka. Four crew members were injured while the captain was killed.
Probable cause:
It was determined that all three engines lost power and eventually failed due to an excessive accumulation of wet snow in the carburetor and the air intake.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.83 Fox Moth in Yellowknife: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 22, 1949
Registration:
CF-DJC
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
FM.29
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Yellowknife, the single engine aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances on the north shore of the Great Slave Lake. All three occupants were killed.

Crash of a Boeing B-29A-60-BN Superfortress near Malmstrom AFB: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 21, 1949
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
44-62098
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
MSN:
11575
YOM:
1944
Crew on board:
12
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
Shortly after a night takeoff from Malmstrom AFB, the aircraft went out of control and crashed in a prairie located seven miles northeast of the airbase. Three crew members were killed while nine others were injured.

Crash of a Noorduyn Norseman near Bissett

Date & Time: Jan 20, 1949
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
CF-CRT
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
MSN:
15
YOM:
1937
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
En route, the engine suffered a technical failure and the pilot elected to make an emergency landing on a lake. The airplane overflew the lake and eventually crashed in the bush. All seven occupants were injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
The carburetor was iced, causing the engine to stop.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.89 Dragon Rapide in Chipping Sodbury: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jan 18, 1949
Operator:
Registration:
NF857
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
6728
YOM:
1944
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Few minutes after his departure from RAF Colerne, the pilot lost control of the aircraft that crashed in a field located one mile north of Chipping Sodbury. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot was killed.

Crash of a Fairchild C-82A-15-FA Packet in Harnett: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 14, 1949
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
44-23010
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Fayetteville - Fayetteville
MSN:
10054
YOM:
1944
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The aircraft left Fayetteville-Pope AFB for a local training sortie with 36 paratroopers on board. En route, the crew encountered an unexpected situation and ordered all passengers to bail out. After the last paratrooper evacuated the cabin, the aircraft went out of control, dove into the ground and crashed in a field located in Harnett, about 17 miles northeast of the airbase. All three crew members were killed.

Crash of a Douglas C-47A-25-DK in Brandywine: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 6, 1949 at 0720 LT
Operator:
Registration:
NC53210
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Miami – West Palm Beach – Raleigh – Boston
MSN:
13777
YOM:
1944
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
3605
Captain / Total hours on type:
3100.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
360
Circumstances:
The flight departed from Miami, Fla., for Boston, Mass., at approximately 1610, January, 1949, with a crew consisting of Stuart L. Morrill, pilot, and Theodore Catz, copilot. A landing was made at Morrison Field, West Palm Beach, Fla., where 6,255 pounds of flowers were loaded. With the flowers, 3,600 pounds of fuel, 254 pounds of oil, and the crew, the airplane weighed 26,944 pounds at time of takeoff, which was 44 pounds above the allowable of 26,900 pounds. All cargo was loaded so that the center of gravity of the airplane was within the certificated limits. Departure from West Palm Beach was accomplished at approximately 1900 after which the flight proceeded without incident to its first fueling stop, Raleigh-Durham, NC. While on the Raleigh-Durham Airport the airplane was fueled to its capacity of 700 gallons, which was 100 gallons more than was on board at West Palm Beach. As a result, the airplane weighed 27,544 pounds when taking off from Raleigh, which constituted an overload of 644 pounds. Because of unfavorable weather conditions, takeoff had been delayed until 0610, January 6, 1949. The flight then continued en route to Boston following an instrument flight plan. Forty-five minutes after departure from Raleigh, at 0655, a routine position report was received by Richmond Radio that the flight was over Richmond, Va., at 9,000 feet. Washington Radio attempted to contact the flight at 0707, but no further communication was received from the flight by any CAA communication station although continuous efforts were made for a period of approximately 50 minutes. The airplane was observed at approximately 0720 over Brandywine, MD, at considerable altitude immediately underneath a cloud deck, proceeding in normal level flight in a northerly direction. Then, to those on the ground, it appeared that the airplane turned left and spun for two complete turns, losing considerable altitude. Partial recovery was made, but the airplane began spinning for a second time to the left. Again it appeared that a partial recovery was made, but again the aircraft spun to the left, losing altitude to below 3,000 feet. After this, ground observers watched the aircraft fly level but erratically for a brief period. They were able to see that the right horizontal stabilizer was deflected upward to a near vertical position, and that the right elevator was missing. The airplane then entered a diving left turn, and crashed 1,500 yards southeast of the Brandywine radio range station. Fire started shortly after impact. Both crew members were killed.
Probable cause:
The Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was the loss of control of the aircraft which resulted from an icing condition, turbulence, and lack of alertness on the part of the crew. As a result, the aircraft spun, and during the spins, or attempted recovery from the spins, severe airloads were encountered which failed the left horizontal stabilizer and the elevators.
The following findings were pointed out:
- The aircraft was observed at considerable altitude, immediately underneath a cloud deck, in straight and level flight after which it made a series of three spins,
- After the recovery from the last spin, the aircraft flew level but erratically for a brief period following which it crashed to the ground,
- The left horizontal stabilizer was bent upwards by severe air loads, and it had rotated several times to a near vertical position while the aircraft was in flight,
- The right elevator was bent upwards and had been separated from the stabilizer as a result of extreme air loads; and the left elevator, although not totally separated from the stabilizer, was similarly damaged,
- At the time of the accident, there was an icing condition present in the layer of broken clouds at the flight’s cruising altitude of 9,000 feet, the temperature at that altitude being 32 degrees Fahrenheit or slightly below. Moderate turbulence also existed,
- The aircraft was equipped with anti-icing equipment for the propellers, but it was not equipped with deicer booth for the wings and empennage,
- Before taking off for the flight, the pilots had a rest period of 22 hours previous to which they had completed another flight of 20 hours and 35 minutes.
Final Report: