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Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver near Buss Lakes: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jun 30, 2011 at 1111 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-GUJX
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Buss Lakes - Southend
MSN:
1132
YOM:
1958
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
4023
Captain / Total hours on type:
3664.00
Aircraft flight hours:
12746
Circumstances:
The Lawrence Bay Airways Ltd. float-equipped de Havilland DHC-2 (registration C-GUJX, serial number 1132) departed from a lake adjacent to a remote fishing cabin near Buss Lakes for a day visual flight rules flight to Southend, Saskatchewan, about 37 nautical miles (nm) southeast. There were 4 passengers and 1 pilot onboard. The aircraft crashed along the shoreline of another lake located about 2 nm southeast of its point of departure. The impact was severe and the 5 occupants were killed on impact. The emergency locator transmitter activated, and the aircraft was found partially submerged in shallow water with the right wing tip resting on the shore. There was no post-crash fire. The accident occurred during daylight hours at about 1111 Central Standard Time.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
While manoeuvring at low level, the aircraft's critical angle of attack was likely exceeded and the aircraft stalled. The stall occurred at an altitude from which recovery was not possible.
Other Findings:
The separation of the propeller blade tip likely resulted from impact forces.
The investigation could not determine whether the fuel pressure warning light was illuminated prior to the accident.
Final Report:

Crash of an Embraer EMB-110P1 Bandeirante in Sellafield: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 13, 1993 at 0820 LT
Operator:
Registration:
G-ZAPE
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Southend - Glasgow
MSN:
110-391
YOM:
1982
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2063
Captain / Total hours on type:
271.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Southend at 06:59 UTC, about one hour before sunrise, on a Special VFR clearance. The aircraft flew to Wallasey via Daventry, White gate and the Liverpool Special Rules Zone at 2,400 feet. It could not be determined why the commander chose to fly this route however, some two weeks before the accident he had spent a short holiday at Haverigg which is close to the direct track from Wallasey to Glasgow. On leaving Wallasey, the aircraft tracked north towards Glasgow and, at 08:01 hrs, the crew called Warton aerodrome stating that they were descending to 1,000 feet and requesting a 'Radar Service'. At 08:10 hrs, an aircraft that had just taken off from Blackpool reported a cloud base of between 2,500 and 3,000 feet and a visibility greater than 20 km. At this time the radar transponder on the aircraft was operating but the height encoding facility had not been selected. Recordings of the Great Dunn Fell and the St Anne's ATC radar heads indicated that the aircraft had left Wallasey on a track of 007°M which was maintained until radar contact was lost at 08:13 hrs at a position one mile to the south west of Walney Island airfield near Barrow in Furness. Consideration of the obscuration due to terrain between the radar heads and the aircraft indicated that, at the time of loss of radar contact, the aircraft would have been no higher than 350 feet amsl and possibly lower. At 08:09 hrs, the time of local sunrise, the crew had called Walney Island stating that they were nine miles south of the airfield at 1,000 feet and requesting overflight of the airfield. At 08:12 hrs, the controller at Walney Island sighted the aircraft abeam the airfield at an estimated height of 800 feet and asked the crew to report at Millom which is about eight miles north of Walney Island. At about the same time, a witness on the beach near the airfield saw the aircraft heading north in and out of cloud at a height estimated to be not above 400 feet. The aircraft did not make the requested position report at Millom and, at 08:16 hrs, the controller advised the crew to call London Information for further service. There was no reply to this call. The last person to see the aircraft reported that it was flying steadily north towards Ponsonby Fell and that the cloud in the area of the Fell was covering the ground at 500 feet above sea level. At about 08:15 hrs a farmer, who was some 600 metres from the crash site, heard a bang from the direction of Ponsonby Fell. He stated that at the time that he heard the bang the weather was very bad with a strong wind, rain and mist covering the fell. The aircraft had flown into ground about 15 metres below the top of Ponsonby Fell. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact and both occupants were killed.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226T Merlin III in Helsinki: 7 killed

Date & Time: Feb 24, 1989 at 2350 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N26RT
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Southend - Helsinki
MSN:
T-216
YOM:
1971
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Captain / Total flying hours:
12991
Aircraft flight hours:
4401
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was completing a night charter flight from Southend to Helsinki, carrying seven passengers and one pilot. On final approach to Helsinki-Vantaa Airport runway 22, the pilot elected to reduce the speed when the aircraft lost altitude, descended below the MDA, struck the ground and came to rest inverted in a snow covered field located about one km short of runway threshold. A passenger was seriously injured while seven other occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
It is believed that the pilot probably encountered difficulties in controlling the altitude and an excessive speed during the final approach procedure. As a result, he retarded engine power by pulling both speed levers backwards. Investigations revealed that the flight idle gate allowing the speed levers to be stopped before being positioned at idle was worn, which allowed the pilot to position both levers to idle position while still on approach. This caused the aircraft to lose speed and altitude and to descend below the minimum descent altitude (MDA) until it struck the ground.
The following contributing factors were reported:
- The pilot did not have sufficient experience on this type of aircraft,
- The pilot's training on such operation was insufficient,
- The accident occurred in demanding instrument flight conditions.
Final Report:

Ground accident of a Vickers 806 Viscount in Southend

Date & Time: Jan 11, 1988 at 1244 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-APIM
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
412
YOM:
1958
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While parked at Southend Airport, the four engine aircraft was struck by a Fairflight Short 330-200 registered G-BHWT and that would be convoyed from Southend to Biggin Hill for maintenance. After being parked at Southend Airport for a long time without any maintenance and due to hydraulic problems, the Short 330 was taxiing when the nosewheel steering system failed and the crew lost control of the aircraft that veered to the left and collided with the parked Viscount. Both pilots on board the Short escaped uninjured and both aircraft were damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Corrosion within the emergency brake accumulator had allowed nitrogen to enter the main hydraulic system of the Short 330. In the past, the aircraft had been parked in the open for a considerable time without servicing.

Crash of a Short 330-200 in Southend

Date & Time: Jan 11, 1988 at 1244 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-BHWT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Southend - Biggin Hill
MSN:
3049
YOM:
1980
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
After being parked at Southend Airport for a long time without any maintenance and due to hydraulic problems, it was decided to ferry the aircraft from Southend to Biggin Hill. While taxiing, the nosewheel steering system failed and the crew lost control of the aircraft that veered to the left and collided with a parked British Air Ferries Vickers 806 Viscount registered G-APIM. Both pilots escaped uninjured and both aircraft were damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Corrosion within the emergency brake accumulator had allowed nitrogen to enter the main hydraulic system. In the past, the aircraft had been parked in the open for a considerable time without servicing.

Crash of a Beechcraft 200 Super King Air in Southend: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 12, 1987 at 0535 LT
Registration:
G-WSJE
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Southend - Bergamo
MSN:
BB-484
YOM:
1979
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4320
Captain / Total hours on type:
50.00
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Southend Airport on a cargo flight to Bergamo, carrying newspapers and magazines. Two minutes and 30 seconds after liftoff, while climbing in limited visibility due to the night and low clouds, the airplane entered a dive and crashed on a garage, bursting into flames. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
Examination of the propeller assemblies indicated that, although the right-hand propeller appeared to have been at fine pitch and rotating at high revolutions at impact, the left-hand propeller had been rotating much more slowly and appeared to have been at, or close to, its fully feathered position. The firewall shut-off fuel valve for the left-hand engine was found in its closed position, consistent with the action of shutting down this engine at some point prior to the impact. A strip examination of the left-hand engine was conducted and showed no evidence of damage to its rotating assemblies prior to the impact with the garage. The only damage identified on this engine as not being consistent with the impact was a ruptured diaphragm within the low-pressure compressor bleed valve. This rolling diaphragm is designed to hold the compressor bleed valve closed a high power settings and to provide smooth opening of the compressor bleed valve with reduction of compressor discharge pressure.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31T Cheyenne II in Southend: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 13, 1986 at 0832 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-IHVI
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cologne - Southend
MSN:
31-8020007
YOM:
1980
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3081
Captain / Total hours on type:
311.00
Circumstances:
A flight plan for the flight from Cologne to Southend was filed on the evening of 12 March 1986. The pilot obtained by telephone details of the actual weather conditions at Southend at 0650 hrs on 13 March 1986. He took off from Cologne at 0714 hrs with a company colleague as his sole passenger. The aircraft flew without incident using the airways as FL220 until cleared by ATC to descend towards Southend. At 0820 hrs the pilot established radio communications with the approach controllers. He was passed details of the existing weather conditions and said that he would try the approach. He requested and was given radar guidance to land on runway 24 at Southend. The published operating minimum for an approach using the 3 cm surveillance radar is an Obstacle Clearance Limit (OCL) of 280 feet. radar guidance for the approach terminates at half a nautical mile from touchdown. The recommended Decision Height (DH) and Runway Visual Range (RVR) published in the UK Air PIlot (RAC 4-6-13) is 380 feet and 800 meters respectively. The approach was flown accurately in azimuth, and advisory heights to maintain a 3° glide path were passed to the pilot. The aircraft's flight path was observed on the London Air Traffic Control descent profile. The radar talkdown was terminated at half a mile and the aircraft was cleared to land. when the aircraft was not sighted from the control tower at the expected time of landing the alarm was raised. Members of the airfield fire service were already positioned on the airfield at 'weather standby'. They initiated a search for the aircraft. It was learned that it had crashed close to an industrial estate which lies about half a mile from the threshold of runway 24. The aircraft had been seen on the normal approach path but at a height judged to be lower than normal. Two eye withnesses saw the aircraft bank sharply to the left before it crashed into a small field. There was a minor post-impact fire in the area of the left engine, which was quickly extinguished by those first on the scene using a hand held extinguisher. The passenger was assisted in opening the main cabin door and he was escorted from the wreckage. The pilot was killed on impact. The passenger, who had been seated in a rearwards facing seat behind the copilot's station, stated that he had glimpsed the ground shortly before the accident but could give no information indicating the cause of the accident.
Final Report:

Crash of a Partenavia P.68B Victor in Orsett

Date & Time: Nov 26, 1979
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-BEXM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Shoreham - Southend
MSN:
111
YOM:
1977
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
En route from Shoreham to Southend, the pilot was forced to attempt an emergency landing for unknown reasons. The twin engine airplane crash landed in Orsett, Essex. All four occupants were rescued while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Douglas DC-6B in Southend

Date & Time: Oct 4, 1974 at 2001 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
OO-VGB
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Southend - Antwerp
MSN:
43830/352
YOM:
1953
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
99
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
21000
Captain / Total hours on type:
2000.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
12000
Copilot / Total hours on type:
3000
Aircraft flight hours:
43017
Circumstances:
The aircraft landed at Southend (SEN) from Antwerp (ANR) at 07:50 hrs on a day excursion. Following a 9 hour rest period, the crew reported for duty at 18:30 to prepare for the return flight. Start up and taxiing out were normal, and a limited power check was completed before takeoff. The Captain, had given a full pre-takeoff briefing before the aircraft left Antwerp that morning, and on this occasion only called for a 'standard briefing', but emphasized that the full abort procedures would be as given during his previous instruction. The First Officer was handling the aircraft from the right hand seat, and gave a shortened takeoff briefing which included the actions required for engine failure before and after V1. Both pilots were wearing headsets, (not fitted with boom microphones) but were not using these for flight deck intercommunication purposes; the Flight Engineer was not wearing a headset. The Captain, who controlled the only source of nose-wheel steering, lined up the aircraft at the beginning of runway 24. Brakes were released and, after stabilizing all four engines at 30 inches of manifold pressure, the First Officer advanced all the right hand throttle levers to takeoff power. The Flight Engineer followed this movement with his left hand on the left-hand group of throttle levers and, when takeoff power was achieved, held the throttle friction lever with his right hand. The captain 's left hand was on the nose steering wheel. At about 75-80 knots, shortly before V1, the captain instructed the Flight Engineer to adjust the power on engines 1 and 2 which were overboosting slightly. The Flight Engineer made this adjustment coincident with the captain calling V1 at about 88 knots, and very shortly afterwards the captain saw the red 'gear unsafe' warning light illuminate. Unknown to the captain or the First Officer the Flight Engineer had made an UP selection of the landing gear selector lever. He stated subsequently that he thought the captain had instructed him to do so shortly after calling V1. The pilots maintain that no such order was given and that nothing additional to the normal procedural calls was said by either of them. The aircraft subsided on to its nose and its propellers struck the runway; throttles were closed and the captain attempted to maintain directional control by use of rudder. The aircraft came to rest 3 metres from the end of the runway with its nose on the ground and with the main landing gear still extended. As soon as the aircraft came to rest the Flight Engineer, having closed the mixture controls to idle cut off and pulled the 'ganged switches' bar, left the aircraft through the right front exit door. On seeing exhaust fires in Nos. 2 and 3 engines he returned to the flight deck and carried out the appropriate engine fire drills. However Nor 3 engine continued to burn, and he extinguished this fire with a portable CO2 appliance. During this period, evacuation drills were initiated, and the passengers left the aircraft in an expeditious and reasonably orderly manner, mostly through the front exit, but some by chute from the rear exit, and a few from an overwing emergency exit.
Probable cause:
The accident was caused by the Flight Engineer's action in selecting landing gear UP before the aircraft was airborne. He did this in the mistaken belief that the Captain had ordered him to do so.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas C-47B-35-DK in Southend

Date & Time: Jun 3, 1971 at 1325 LT
Operator:
Registration:
PH-MOA
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Southend – Amsterdam
MSN:
16605/33353
YOM:
1945
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
32
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4663
Captain / Total hours on type:
1750.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3247
Copilot / Total hours on type:
230
Aircraft flight hours:
6372
Circumstances:
The aircraft was engaged in a charter flight from Southend to Amsterdam, carrying 32 supporters of the Ajax football team back to The Netherlands. Following a fall in manifold pressure and the discovery of an oil leak in the starboard engine soon after a night takeoff, the pilot decided to return to Southend Airport for an emergency landing. In order to avoid an overshoot, he positioned the flaps to a 15° angle for the landing which resulted in a higher than normal airspeed at touchdown. The aircraft touched down about half-way down the runway in use, overran the paved area and collided with an earth bank. Of the 32 passengers and four crew on board, two passengers were injured. The aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
The accident was due to a late touchdown and inappropriate use of the flaps. Insufficient braking efficiency resulted in a higher speed of overrun than would have otherwise occurred. The following factors were reported:
- The documentation of the aircraft was not in order,
- The number of persons on board was in excess of the number for which seating capacity and safety belts were provided, and the aircraft weight at take-off was 335 kg in excess of the authorised maximum,
- Following an engine failure in the air, the aircraft made an emergency landing at Southend Airport at a weight 560 kg in excess of its regulated landing weight,
- The approach and landing was made with 15° of flap extended, full flap was not used,
- Touchdown occurred approximately half way down the runway,
- The aircraft wheels brakes were worn to the extent that their efficiency would have been impaired and oil may have reduced the grip of the starboard tyre,
- The aircraft overran the paved area and collided with an earth bank on the aerodrome boundary.
Final Report: