Crash of a Douglas C-118B Liftmaster at Patriot Hills Base Camp

Date & Time: Nov 26, 1993
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N1597F
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Punta Arenas - Patriot Hills
MSN:
43700
YOM:
1953
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The four engine aircraft was completing a cargo flight from Punta Arenas, carrying two passengers, six crew members and several sleigh dogs. On final approach, the captain decided to slightly deviate from the approach path to avoid local patches of fog and thus maintaining a visual contact with the ground. At an altitude of 450 feet, he increased engine power but the aircraft continued to descent until it struck the ground near the camp. All eight occupants and all animals were evacuated safely while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Douglas C-118A Liftmaster in the Caribbean Sea: 3 killed

Date & Time: Sep 18, 1992
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
YV-502C
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Willemstad - Miami
MSN:
44656
YOM:
1955
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
While cruising by night on a cargo flight from Willemstad-Hato Airport to Miami-Intl Airport, the four engine aircraft entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed in the Caribbean Sea. Few debris floating on water and the dead body of the copilot were found about 210 km northwest of Curaçao Island. The aircraft was flying in poor weather conditions with thunderstorm activity and turbulences when the accident occurred.

Crash of a Douglas C-118A near Bogotá

Date & Time: Feb 10, 1991 at 1140 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HK-1702
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Bogotá – Arauca
MSN:
44670
YOM:
1955
Country:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
80
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The four engine aircraft was chartered by the Colombian Army to transfer 80 soldiers from Bogotá to Arauca. They were seating on the cabin floor with their equipment. In the morning, the crew encountered technical problems after takeoff from Bogotá Airport and was forced to return. After repairs were completed, the aircraft departed again before noon. During initial climb, the engine n°1 caught fire. The crew declared an emergency and was cleared to return when the fire spread to the engine n°2. The captain realized he could not reach the airport so he attempted an emergency landing in a pasture located 16 km from the airfield. The aircraft belly landed and slid for about 400 meters before coming to rest, bursting into flames. All 85 occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was destroyed by fire.
Probable cause:
Failure and explosion of engine n°1 for unknown reasons.

Crash of a Douglas C-118A Liftmaster near Sainte-Anne-des-Monts: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jun 26, 1989 at 1940 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GBYA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Bonaventure - Bonaventure
MSN:
43717
YOM:
1953
Country:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Aircraft flight hours:
24220
Circumstances:
A Douglas C-118A (DC-6A) fire fighting plane was destroyed in an accident near Sainte-Anne-des-Monts, QC, Canada. All four crew members were killed. The Conifair plane took off from Bonaventure Airport, QC (YVB) at 19:15 for a spray operation 30 miles southeast of Sainte-Anne-des-Monts. This was to be the last spraying flight of the season out of the Bonaventure base. A crew of four was on board, including two flight engineers who were on a familiarization training flight. The aircraft was carrying 2,952 U.S. gallons of Dipel 132, a non-toxic microbial insecticide. The aircraft arrived over the spray area at 19:35. An inertial navigation system (INS) to follow pre-established spraying tracks. The first track was sprayed uneventfully. At the end of the first track, the aircraft made a 180-degree turn to spray the second track, which was parallel to and about 800 feet northeast of the first track. This meant that the aircraft had to fly from a valley at an elevation of 1,000 feet above sea level (asl) up a mountain consisting of two levels. The first level is about 1,800 feet asl and about 3,280 feet along the flight path. After the first level, the terrain rose within approximately 1,000 feet along the flight path, to the summit of the mountain at an elevation of 2,175 feet asl. The two occupants of a Cessna 310 spotter aircraft observed a decrease of the DC-6A ground speed during the climb over the first level of the mountain. They then noticed that the aircraft yawed and started a steep, left turn. The spotter crew stated that, shortly after the start of the left turn, the DC-6A left wing began to strike trees. The aircraft nosed down, crashed on the side of the mountain, and exploded at an elevation of 2,050 feet asl.
Probable cause:
On a low-level spraying flight, the crew attempted a climb over rising terrain which exceeded the climb performance of the aircraft.

Crash of a Douglas C-118A Liftmaster in San Salvador: 37 killed

Date & Time: May 1, 1986 at 0632 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
FAS302
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
San Salvador - Panama
MSN:
44654
YOM:
1955
Country:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
33
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
37
Circumstances:
After takeoff from San Salvador-Ilopango Airport, while in initial climb, one of the four engine failed and caught fire. The airplane was unable to gain sufficient height and struck the slope of a mountain located about 3 km from the airport. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and all 37 occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Engine failure and fire during initial climb for unknown reasons.

Crash of a Douglas C-118A in Egegik

Date & Time: Jul 7, 1985 at 0115 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N2878F
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Egelik - Kodiak
MSN:
44660
YOM:
1955
Location:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
18640
Captain / Total hours on type:
468.00
Aircraft flight hours:
22655
Circumstances:
Airplane accelerated to V1 and struck through on sandy beach. The nose pitched up and the pilot lost directional control. The airplane struck adjacent bank caught fire. It was totally destroyed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: loss of control - on ground/water
Phase of operation: takeoff - roll/run
Findings
1. Airport facilities, runway/landing area condition - inadequate
2. Airport facilities, runway/landing area condition - dirt bank/rising embankment
3. Airport facilities, runway/landing area condition - rough/uneven
4. (c) directional control - not maintained - pilot in command
5. (c) ground loop/swerve - uncontrolled - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: on ground/water encounter with terrain/water
Phase of operation: takeoff - roll/run
Findings
6. (c) unsuitable terrain or takeoff/landing/taxi area - not identified - pilot in command
7. (c) preflight planning/preparation - disregarded - pilot in command
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas C-118A Liftmaster in San Manuel

Date & Time: Apr 28, 1984 at 1630 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N92860
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saint Petersburg – Chandler
MSN:
44619/549
YOM:
1955
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6983
Captain / Total hours on type:
3200.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft skidded off the departure end of the runway collapsing the landing gear in a ditch as it caught on fire. This aircraft was on a ferry flight and had several mechanical problems. Among these was the prop reversers which failed on landing. The anti-ice/de-ice systems failed to work properly which contributed to the need to land short of destination. The copilot reported that she did not check the anti-icing equipment on pre-flight. She was also not qualified to be a copilot on this flight. The airspeed indicators were malfunctioning during landing. The crew members all said that they knew the airspeed was much too high. The copilot said she could not understand how the pilot thought he could land at such a high speed. She also said he called for reverse and applied brakes too late in the rollout.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: overrun
Phase of operation: landing - roll
Findings
1. (f) weather condition - tailwind
2. (c) wrong runway - selected - pilot in command
3. (f) pressure induced by others - pilot in command
4. (f) propeller system/accessories,reversing system - failure,partial
5. (c) airspeed - excessive - pilot in command
6. (f) anti-ice/deice system,windshield - inoperative
7. (c) proper touchdown point - not attained - pilot in command
8. (c) operation with known deficiencies in equipment - performed - pilot in command
9. (f) precautionary landing - premature - pilot in command
10. (c) judgment - poor - pilot in command
11. (f) procedures/directives - not followed - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: main gear collapsed
Phase of operation: landing - roll
Findings
12. (f) landing gear, main gear - overload
Final Report: