code

SD

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-60 Marquise in Sioux Falls: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 7, 2020 at 0415 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N44MX
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Everett – Huron
MSN:
1526
YOM:
1981
Flight number:
MDS44
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The pilot departed Everett-Payne Field in the evening of June 6 on a cargo service to Huron, SD. En route, he was informed about the presence of thunderstorms in the Huron area and decided to divert to Sioux Falls Airport where he landed at 0140LT. Awaiting weather improvement, he left Sioux Falls around 0415LT to resume his flight to Huron. Upon takeoff, the twin engine aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances and was destroyed. The pilot was killed.

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12/47E near Chamberlain: 9 killed

Date & Time: Nov 30, 2019 at 1230 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N56KJ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chamberlain – Idaho Falls
MSN:
1431
YOM:
2013
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Chamberlain Airport in marginal weather conditions. Few minutes later, while flying in snow falls, the airplane went out of control and crashed in a cornfield located about 30 miles west-southwest of Chamberlain. Three passengers aged 17, 27 and 28 were injured and evacuated to hospitals in Chamberlain, Mitchell and Sioux Falls while nine other occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader in Batesland

Date & Time: Apr 24, 2018 at 1000 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N9746C
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Aberdeen - Pine Ridge
MSN:
303-00210
YOM:
1983
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5655
Captain / Total hours on type:
4403.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8929
Circumstances:
Before the air taxi flight, the commercial pilot obtained a weather briefing via the company computer system and reviewed the weather information with the company chief pilot. The pilot stated that based on the computer briefing, which did not include icing conditions, he was aware of the forecasted weather conditions along the route of flight and at the intended destination. However, the briefing was incomplete as it did not contain any in-flight weather advisories, which would have alerted the pilot of moderate icing conditions expected over the flight route in the form of AIRMET Zulu. After takeoff and during the climb to 12,000 ft mean sea level (msl), the airplane encountered light rime ice, and the pilot activated the de-ice equipment with no issues noted. After hearing reports of better weather at a lower altitude, the pilot requested a descent to between 5,000 and 6,000 ft. During the descent to 6,000 ft msl and with the airplane clear of ice, the airplane encountered light to moderate icing conditions. The pilot considered turning back to another airport but could not get clearance until the airplane was closer to his destination. Shortly thereafter, the pilot stated that it felt “like a sheet of ice fell on us” as the airplane encountered severe icing conditions. The pilot applied full engine power in an attempt to maintain altitude. The airplane exited the overcast cloud layer about 500 ft above ground level. The pilot chose to execute an off-airport emergency landing because the airplane could not maintain altitude. During the landing, the landing gear separated; the airplane came to rest upright and sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation and that the airplane was within its maximum gross weight. Structural icing was observed on the airframe after the landing. Based on the weather information, which indicated the probability of icing between 5,000 and 9,000 ft over the region and a high threat of supercooled large droplets between 5,000 and 7,000 ft, it is likely that the airplane, which was equipped for flight in icing conditions, inadvertently encountered severe icing conditions consistent with supercooled large droplets, which resulted in structural icing that exceeded the airplane’s capabilities to maintain altitude.
Probable cause:
The airplane’s inadvertent encounter with severe icing conditions during descent, which resulted in structural icing, the pilot’s inability to maintain altitude, and an emergency landing. Contributing to the accident was an incomplete preflight weather briefing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed C-130H Hercules near Edgemont: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jul 1, 2012 at 1830 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
93-1458
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Colorado Springs - Colorado Springs
MSN:
5363
YOM:
1994
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The crew was engaged in a fire fighting mission in the region of Edgemont, southwest part of South Dakota. The aircraft left Colorado Springs-Peterson Field in the afternoon and crashed soon after it discharged its load of 3,000 gallons of retardant. Four crew were killed while two others were seriously injured. The aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire.
Probable cause:
The accident investigation report released by the Air Force Air Mobility Command said the crash happened because the crew made an "inadequate assessment" of weather conditions and it flew into a microburst.

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Sioux Falls: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 9, 2011 at 1424 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N421SY
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sioux Falls - Rapid City
MSN:
421-0051
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
3848
Captain / Total hours on type:
357.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4882
Circumstances:
Shortly after the airplane lifted off, the tower controller informed the pilot that a plume of smoke was visible behind the airplane. No communications were received from the pilot after he acknowledged the takeoff clearance. Witnesses reported that white smoke appeared to be trailing from the area of the left engine during takeoff. The witnesses subsequently observed flames at the inboard side of the left engine. The airplane began a left turn. As the airplane continued the turn, the flames and trail of white smoke were no longer visible. When the airplane reached a southerly heading, the nose dropped abruptly, and the airplane descended to the ground. Witnesses stated that they heard an increase in engine sound before impact. A postimpact fire ensued. The accident site was located about 3/4 mile from the airport. A postaccident examination determined that the left engine fuel selector and fuel valve were in the OFF position, consistent with the pilot shutting down that engine after takeoff. However, the left engine propeller was not feathered. Extensive damage to the right engine propeller assembly was consistent with that engine producing power at the time of impact. The landing gear and wing flaps were extended at the time of impact. Teardown examinations of both engines did not reveal any anomalies consistent with a loss of engine power. The left engine oil cap was observed to be unsecured at the accident site; however, postaccident comparison of the left and right engine oil caps revealed disproportionate distortion of the left oil cap, likely due to the postimpact fire. As a result, no determination was made regarding the security of left engine oil cap before the accident. Emergency procedures outlined in the pilot’s operating handbook (POH) noted that when securing an engine, the propeller should be feathered. Performance data provided in the POH for single-engine operations were predicated on the propeller of the inoperative engine being feathered, and the wing flaps and landing gear retracted. Thus, the pilot did not follow the emergency procedures outlined in the POH for single-engine operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed after shutting down one engine, which resulted in an inadvertent aerodynamic stall and impact with terrain. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s failure to follow the guidance contained in the pilot’s operating handbook, which advised feathering the propeller of the secured engine and retracting the flaps and landing gear.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 99 in Rapid City

Date & Time: Dec 29, 2006 at 0200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N99TH
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Pierre-Rapid City
MSN:
U-155
YOM:
1974
Flight number:
AIP408
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3652
Captain / Total hours on type:
3069.00
Aircraft flight hours:
39795
Circumstances:
While descending to Rapid City airport in unfavorable weather conditions, the pilot decided to perform a missed approach procedure. In the mean time, the right wing struck the ground and the aircraft crashed in an open field located 10 miles from the runway threshold, 4.5 miles southwest of Caputa's city. The pilot was slightly injured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. The pilot was making a cargo flight from Pierre airport with a load of 1,500 pounds of express mail.

Crash of a Learjet 35 in Ellsworth AFB: 2 killed

Date & Time: Feb 2, 2002 at 1715 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
84-0097
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Ellsworth AFB-Ellsworth AFB
MSN:
35-543
YOM:
1984
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
After takeoff from runway 31, aircraft bank left and crashed in an open field. Both pilots were killed. Cew was performing a training flight.

Crash of a Learjet 35 in Aberdeen: 6 killed

Date & Time: Oct 25, 1999 at 1213 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N47BA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Orlando-Dallas
MSN:
35-060
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
4280
Captain / Total hours on type:
60.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1700
Copilot / Total hours on type:
200
Aircraft flight hours:
10506
Aircraft flight cycles:
7500

Crash of a Socata TBM-700 in South Dakota: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 4, 1998 at 1345 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N69BS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Lawrence-Madison-Spearfish
MSN:
010
YOM:
1991
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
3150
Aircraft flight hours:
1695