Country

Crash of a Swearingen SA227AC Metro III in Sanikiluaq: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 22, 2012 at 1813 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GFWX
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Winnipeg - Sanikiluaq
MSN:
AC-650B
YOM:
1986
Flight number:
PAG671
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Crew was performing a flight from Winnipeg to Sanikiluaq, Nunavut, on behalf of Keewatin Air. On final approach to runway 27 in poor weather conditions, pilot decided to make a go around. On the second attempt, aircraft hit the ground 150 to 200 meters short of runway and came to rest in snow. A young child aged six months was killed in the accident as all other occupants were injured. Aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Boeing 737-210C in Resolute Bay: 12 killed

Date & Time: Aug 20, 2011 at 1142 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GNWN
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Yellowknife - Resolute Bay - Grise Fiord
MSN:
21067/414
YOM:
1975
Flight number:
FAB6550
Country:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
12
Circumstances:
On final approach to Resolute Bay in poor weather conditions, while descending on an ILS procedure to runway 35T, aircraft hit the ground and disintegrated 1,8 km north of the airport. Three passengers were seriously injured while all 12 other occupants were killed. At the time of the accident, visibility was established to 5 miles with drizzle, fog and ceiling at 300 feet. Without visual contact with the ground, captain elected to make a go around manoeuvre but aircraft hit the ground two seconds later at the speed of 157 knots. At impact, landing gear were down and locked with flaps at 40 degrees. To date, worst accident involving a First Air plane since its creation in 1946 and worst crash in Nunavut.
Probable cause:
Still under investigation. Up to date, the following data are available:
In the hours before the accident, the weather in Resolute Bay was variable with fluctuations in visibility and cloud ceiling. Forty minutes before the accident, the visibility was 10 miles in light drizzle with an overcast ceiling at 700 feet above ground level (agl). A weather observation taken shortly after the accident, reported visibility of 5 miles in light drizzle and mist with an overcast ceiling of 300 feet agl.
The weather conditions required the crew to conduct an instrument approach using the aircraft flight and navigation instruments. The crew planned to conduct an instrument landing system (ILS) approach to Runway 35T. This instrument approach provides guidance down to weather minimums of 1⁄2 mile visibility and a ceiling of 200 feet agl.
The crew initiated a go-around 2 seconds before impact. At this time, the flaps were set to position 40, the landing gear was down and locked, the speed was 157 knots and the final landing checklist was complete.
Another aircraft successfully completed an ILS approach to Runway 35T approximately 20 minutes after the accident. NAV CANADA conducted a flight check of the ground based ILS equipment on 22 August 2011; it was reported as serviceable.
The Resolute Bay Airport is normally an uncontrolled airport (no Air Traffic Controllers). A temporary military control zone had been established to accommodate the increase in air traffic resulting from Operation Nanook, a military exercise taking place at the time. Information from the military radars that had been installed for the exercise was retrieved for TSB analysis.
The technical examination of the aircraft at the accident site revealed no pre-impact problems. Analysis of the flight data recorder information and examination of the engines at the site indicate the engines were operating and developing considerable power at the time of the accident. Analysis of the aircraft flight and navigational instruments is ongoing.
Currently, the TSB is classifying this occurrence as a controlled flight into terrain (CFIT) accident. CFIT occurs when an airworthy aircraft under the control of the flight crew is flown unintentionally into terrain, obstacles or water, usually with no prior awareness by the crew. CFIT is one of the issues identified in the TSB Watchlist.
Investigation Activities in Progress

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 500S in Rankin Inlet

Date & Time: Jul 18, 2010 at 1330 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N5800H
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Portland - Rankin Inlet - Iqaluit - Bern
MSN:
3082
YOM:
1970
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
23100
Captain / Total hours on type:
40.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
5400
Copilot / Total hours on type:
13
Circumstances:
The Aero Commander 500S had recently been purchased. The new owner of the aircraft retained the services of 2 experienced pilots to deliver the aircraft from Portland, Oregon, United States, to Bern, Switzerland. After having flown several positioning legs, the aircraft arrived at Rankin Inlet for refuelling. The aircraft was refuelled from two 45-gallon drums and was to continue on to Iqaluit, Nunavut. The pilot-in-command occupied the right seat and the pilot flying the aircraft occupied the left seat. The aircraft was at its maximum takeoff weight of 7000 pounds. Prior to take off, the crew conducted a run-up and all indications seemed normal. During the takeoff roll, the engines did not produce full power and the crew elected to reject the takeoff. After returning to the ramp, a second run-up was completed and once again all indications seemed normal. Shortly after second rotation, cylinder head temperatures increased and both Lycoming TIO-540-E1B5 engines began to lose power. The pilots attempted to return to the airport, but were unable to maintain altitude. The landing gear was extended and a forced landing was made on a flat section of land, approximately 1500 feet to the southwest of the runway 13 threshold. There were no injuries and the aircraft sustained substantial damage.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
1. At the fuel compound, the 45-gallon drum containing slops was located near the stock of sealed 45-gallon drums of 100LL AVGAS, contributing to the fuel handler selecting the drum of slops in error.
2. The 45-gallon drum of slops had similar markings to the stock of sealed 45-gallon drums of 100LL AVGAS, preventing ready identification of the contaminated drum.
3. The fuel handler did not notice that the large bung plug was not sealed on the second 45-gallon drum and, as a result, delivered the drum of slops to the aircraft.
4. The pilots did not notice that the large bung plug was not sealed on the second 45-gallon drum and, as a result, fuelled the aircraft with contaminated fuel.
5. The pilots were inexperienced with refuelling from 45-gallon drums and did not take steps to ascertain the proper fuel grade in the second 45-gallon drum. As a result, slops, rather than 100LL AVGAS, was pumped into the aircraft’s fuel system.
6. The fuel system design was such that the fuel from both wing fuel cells combined in the centre fuel cell and, as a result, contaminated fuel was fed to both engines.
7. The contaminated fuel resulted in engine power loss in both engines and the aircraft was unable to maintain altitude after takeoff.
Finding as to Risk:
1. The impact force angles were substantially different from that of the ELT’s G-switch orientation. As a result, the ELT did not activate during the impact. This could have delayed search and rescue (SAR) notification.
Final Report:

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter north of Alert

Date & Time: May 10, 2010 at 1719 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-FSJB
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
MSN:
377
YOM:
1973
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crew was performing a survey flight in the Nunavut with three scientists on board. Equipped with ski, aircraft landed on the snow covered terrain some 168 km north of Alert Air Base. After landing, aircraft came to a halt when the right ski punctured the ice and the aircraft sunk. All five occupants escaped without injury and were evacuated two hours later by the crew of a Bell 407 to Resolute Bay. Damaged beyond repair, aircraft was abandoned on site and later cancelled from registry in November 2011.
Probable cause:
Landing gear went through ice after landing on unsuitable terrain.

Crash of a Dornier DO228 in Cambridge Bay

Date & Time: Dec 13, 2008 at 0143 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FYEV
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Resolute Bay - Cambridge Bay
MSN:
8133
YOM:
1987
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
12
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
13400
Captain / Total hours on type:
802.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
850
Copilot / Total hours on type:
470
Circumstances:
The Summit Air Charters Dornier 228-202 was on a charter flight from Resolute Bay to Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, under instrument flight rules. While on final approach to Runway 31 True, the aircraft collided with the ground approximately 1.5 nautical miles from the threshold at 0143 mountain standard time. Of the 2 pilots and 12 passengers on board, 2 persons received serious injuries. The aircraft was substantially damaged. The emergency locator transmitter activated, and the crew notified the Cambridge Bay Airport radio operator of the accident via the aircraft radio. Local ground search efforts found the aircraft within 30 minutes, and all occupants were removed from the site within two hours.
Probable cause:
An abbreviated visual approach was conducted at night in instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in the flight crew’s inability to obtain sufficient visual reference to judge their height above the ground.
The flight crew did not monitor pressure altimeter readings or reference the minimum altitude requirements in relation to aircraft position on the approach, resulting in controlled flight into terrain.
The pilots had not received training and performance checks for the installed global positioning system (GPS) equipment, and were not fully competent in its use. The attempts at adjusting the settings likely distracted the pilots from maintaining the required track and ground clearance during the final approach.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas DC-3 in Ennadai: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 17, 2000 at 1230 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-FNTF
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Points North Landing-Lac Ennaidai
MSN:
12344
YOM:
1944
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
8200
Captain / Total hours on type:
840.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
4300
Copilot / Total hours on type:
85

Crash of an Avro 748 in Iqaluit

Date & Time: Dec 3, 1998 at 1536 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FBNW
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Iqaluit-Igloolik
MSN:
1759
YOM:
1978
Flight number:
FAB802
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
8000
Captain / Total hours on type:
800.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2143
Copilot / Total hours on type:
117

Crash of a Lockheed C-130 Hercules near Alert: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 30, 1991 at 1640 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
130322
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Edmonton - Thule - Alert
MSN:
4192
YOM:
1967
Flight number:
Boxtop22
Country:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
13
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
Every year, in the cold and darkness of late October, personnel at Canadian Forces Station Alert on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, gather at a cairn near the runway to remember the crew and passengers of Hercules 130322 who lost their lives during a resupply mission to the station. On October 30, 1991, at approximately 4:40 p.m., flight 22 of Operation Boxtop – as the biannual resupply mission is called – was on its final approach to the station from Thule Air Force Base in Greenland. As the CC-130 Hercules from 435 Transport and Rescue Squadron, loaded with 3,400 litres of diesel fuel, began its descent, the pilot flying lost sight of the runway. Moments later, radar contact and communication were lost as the aircraft crashed approximately 16 km south of the station. The crew of another CC-130 Hercules, also bound for Alert, saw the fires of the crash and identified the location of Boxtop 22. The crash took the lives of five Canadian Armed Forces members – four died in the crash and one perished before help arrived – and led to the boldest and most massive air disaster rescue mission ever undertaken by the Canadian military in the High Arctic. Thirteen lives were saved. Within a half hour of the rescue call, a Hercules carrying 12 search and rescue technicians from 440 Search and Rescue Squadron in Edmonton, Alberta, was in the air. It reached the crash site seven and a half hours later, but the SAR technicians couldn’t descend due to the weather. Another Hercules from 413 Search and Rescue Squadron in Greenwood, Nova Scotia, soon joined the search. Meanwhile, search and rescue technicians formed a ground rescue team at Alert and set out overland for the crash site, guided through the darkness and horrendous weather conditions by a Hercules. The survivors, some soaked in diesel fuel, endured high winds and temperatures between -20C and -30C. Many sheltered in the tail section of the downed aircraft but others were more exposed to the elements. Finally, the 413 Squadron team finally got a break in the weather and six SAR technicians parachuted into the site more than 32 hours after the crash and began looking for survivors. They were joined soon after by more SAR technicians. When the ground rescue team finally arrived – 21 hours after it had set out – 26 rescuers were on the ground. They warmed and treated the injured and prepared them for medical evacuation. A Twin Huey helicopter from Alert made three trips to bring the survivors back to the station. Once again this year, personnel at Alert will conduct a parade on October 30 to commemorate the crash. The parade will begin at 4:30 p.m. and continue through the 4:40 p.m. timing when the crash occurred.
Those killed were:
Cpt John Couch, pilot,
Cpt Judy Trépanier, logistics officer,
M/WO Tom Jardine, regional services manager CANEX,
W/O Robert Grimsley, supply technician,
M/Cpl Roland Pitre, traffic technician.
Those who survived were:
Robert Thomson,
Susan Hillier,
Cpt Richard Dumoulin, logistics officer,
Cpt Wilma DeGroot, doctor,
Lt Joe Bales, pilot,
Lt Mike Moore, navigator,
M/WO Marc Tremblay, supply technician,
Sgt Paul West, flight engineer,
M/Cpl Tony Cobden, communications researcher,
M/Cpl David Meace, radio technician,
M/Cpl Mario Ellefsen, communications researcher,
M/S “Monty” Montgomery, communications researcher,
Pvt Bill Vance, communications researcher.
Source:
http://www.rcaf-arc.forces.gc.ca/en/article-template-standard.page?doc=remembering-the-crash-of-boxtop-flight-22/ig9v1k0t
Final Report: