code

NC

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage near Aventon: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jun 7, 2019 at 1345 LT
Registration:
N709CH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Naples - Easton
MSN:
46-36431
YOM:
2007
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
While cruising at an altitude of 27,000 feet from Naples (Florida), to Easton (Maryland) in marginal weather conditions, the single engine airplane suffered a structural failure when both wings separated. Out of control, the airplane entered a dive and crashed inverted in a wooded area located near Aventon. The airplane was totally destroyed and all four occupants and two dogs were killed.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter 200 in Franklin

Date & Time: Sep 6, 2015 at 1445 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N181CS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Franklin - Franklin
MSN:
181
YOM:
1968
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the take off run, the aircraft went out off control, veered off runway, collided with trees and came to rest with the right wing sheared off. Both pilots were injured.

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12/45 in Burlington: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jan 16, 2013 at 0557 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N68PK
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Burlington - Morristown
MSN:
0265
YOM:
1998
Flight number:
Skylab 53
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
6279
Circumstances:
Aircraft was destroyed when it impacted the ground in Burlington, North Carolina. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and a instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight departed from Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport (BUY), Burlington, North Carolina at 0553, and was destined for Morristown Municipal Airport (MMU), Morristown, New Jersey. The business flight transporting medical specimens was operated by LabCorp, Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Review of preliminary air traffic control radar and communication data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Greensboro Approach Control, revealed that the airplane departed from runway 06 at BUY and made initial contact while climbing to the assigned altitude of 3,000 feet mean sea level. The pilot was told to reset his transponder and no further communications were received from the accident flight. According to FAA records, the pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane single-engine land, as well as a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on November 19, 2012, at which time he reported 6,279 total hours of flight experience. The accident site was located in a park approximately 5 miles northeast of BUY. The initial impact location was identified by a ground impression with various parts of the right wing and also a crater that measured about 3 feet deep. The wreckage debris field was 793 foot-long and 298 foot-wide, oriented on a 140 degree heading. Various sizes of wing spar segments, the propeller hub, two propeller blades, and the front reduction gear box were located in the crater. The engine was located about 100 feet from the impact point. Fragments of the airplane, including a section of the cabin area, empennage, left and right wings, and cockpit were located along the wreckage path. The two other propeller blades were located about 200 and 400 feet from the impact point, and exhibited some Sbending damage. All major flight control surfaces and associated counter weights were located in the debris field. The 0554 recorded weather observation at BUY, included wind from 040 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 10 miles, broken clouds at 700 feet above ground level (agl), overcast at 1,700 agl, temperature 4 degrees C, dew point 3 degrees C; barometric altimeter 30.02 inches of mercury.

Crash of a Cessna 501 Citation I in Franklin: 5 killed

Date & Time: Mar 15, 2012 at 1400 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N7700T
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Venice - Franklin
MSN:
501-0248
YOM:
1982
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
1159
Captain / Total hours on type:
185.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4825
Circumstances:
The pilot was not familiar with the mountain airport. The airplane was high during the first visual approach to the runway. The pilot performed a go-around and the airplane was again high for the second approach. During the second approach, the approach angle steepened, and the airplane pitched nose-down toward the runway. The nosegear touched down about halfway down the runway followed by main gear touchdown. The airplane then bounced and the sound of engine noise increased as the airplane banked right and the right wing contacted the ground. The airplane subsequently flipped over and off the right side of the runway, and a postcrash fire ensued. Examination of the airframe and engines did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. The examination also revealed that the right engine thrust reverser was deployed during the impact sequence, and the left engine thrust reverser was stowed. Although manufacturer data revealed single-engine reversing has been demonstrated during normal landings and is easily controllable, the airplane had already porpoised and bounced during the landing. The pilot’s subsequent activation of only the right engine’s thrust reverser would have created an asymmetrical thrust and most likely exacerbated an already uncontrolled touchdown. Had the touchdown been controlled, the airplane could have stopped on the remaining runway or the pilot could have performed a go-around uneventfully.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to achieve a stabilized approach, resulting in a nose-first, bounced landing. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's activation of only one thrust reverser, resulting in asymmetrical thrust.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 550 Citation II in Manteo

Date & Time: Oct 1, 2010 at 0830 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N262Y
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tampa - Manteo
MSN:
550-0291
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
9527
Captain / Total hours on type:
2025.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9643
Circumstances:
According to postaccident written statements from both pilots, the pilot-in-command (PIC) was the pilot flying and the copilot was the pilot monitoring. As the airplane approached Dare County Regional Airport (MQI), Manteo, North Carolina, the copilot obtained the current weather information. The automated weather system reported wind as 350 degrees at 4 knots, visibility at 1.5 miles in heavy rain, and a broken ceiling at 400 feet. The copilot stated that the weather had deteriorated from the previous reports at MQI. The PIC stated that they would fly one approach to take a look and that, if the airport conditions did not look good, they would divert to another airport. Both pilots indicated in phone interviews that, although they asked the Washington air route traffic control center controller for the global positioning system (GPS) runway 5 approach, they did not expect it due to airspace restrictions. They expected and received a GPS approach to runway 23 to circle-to-land on runway 5. According to the pilots' statements, the airplane was initially fast on approach to runway 23. As a result, the copilot could not deploy approach flaps when the PIC requested because the airspeed was above the flap operating range. The PIC subsequently slowed the airplane, and the copilot extended flaps to the approach setting. The PIC also overshot an intersection but quickly corrected and was on course about 1 mile prior to the initial approach fix. The airplane crossed the final approach fix on speed (Vref was 104) at the appropriate altitude, with the flaps and landing gear extended. The copilot completed the approach and landing checklist items but did not call out items because the PIC preferred that copilots complete checklists quietly. The PIC then stated that they would not circle-to-land due to the low ceiling. He added that a landing on runway 23 would be suitable because the wind was at a 90-degree angle to the runway, and there was no tailwind factor. Based on the reported weather, a tailwind component of approximately 2 knots existed at the time of the accident, and, in a subsequent statement to the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot acknowledged there was a tailwind about 20 degrees behind the right wing. The copilot had the runway in sight about 200 feet above the minimum descent altitude, which was 440 feet above the runway. The copilot reported that he mentally prepared for a go around when the PIC stated that the airplane was high about 300 feet above the runway, but neither pilot called for one. The flight crew stated that the airplane touched down at 100 knots between the 1,000-foot marker and the runway intersection-about 1,200 feet beyond the approach end of the 4,305-foot-long runway. The speed brakes, thrust reversers, and brakes were applied immediately after the nose gear touched down and worked properly, but the airplane departed the end of the runway at about 40 knots. According to data extracted from the enhanced ground proximity warning system, the airplane touched down about 1,205 feet beyond the approach end of the 4,305-foot-long wet runway, at a ground speed of 127 knots. Data from the airplane manufacturer indicated that, for the estimated landing weight, the airplane required a landing distance of approximately 2,290 feet on a dry runway, 3,550 feet on a wet runway, or 5,625 feet for a runway with 0.125 inch of standing water. The chart also contained a note that the published limiting maximum tailwind component for the airplane is 10 knots but that landings on precipitation-covered runways with any tailwind component are not recommended. The note also indicates that if a tailwind landing cannot be avoided, the above landing distance data should be multiplied by a factor that increases the wet runway landing distance to 3,798 feet, and the landing distance for .125 inch of standing water to 6,356 feet. All distances in the performance chart are based on flying a normal approach at Vref, assume a touchdown point 840 feet from the runway threshold in no wind conditions, and include distance from the threshold to touchdown. The PIC's statement about the airplane being high at 300 feet above the runway reportedly prompted the copilot to mentally prepare for a go around, but neither pilot called for one. However, the PIC asked the copilot what he thought, and his reply was " it's up to you." The pilots touched down at an excessive airspeed (23 knots above Vref), more than 1,200 feet down a wet 4,305-foot-long runway, leaving about 3,100 feet for the airplane to stop. According to manufacturer calculations, about 2,710 feet of ground roll would be required after the airplane touched down, assuming a touchdown speed at Vref; a longer ground roll would be required at higher touchdown speeds. Although a 2 knot crosswind component existed at the time of the accident, the airplane's excessive airspeed at touchdown (23 knots above Vref) had a much larger effect on the outcome of the landing.
Probable cause:
The pilot-in-command's failure to maintain proper airspeed and his failure to initiate a go-around, which resulted in the airplane touching down too fast on a short, wet runway and a subsequent runway overrun. Contributing to the accident was the copilot's failure to adequately monitor the approach and call for a go around and the flight crew's lack of proper crew resource management.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 550 in Wilmington

Date & Time: Jan 4, 2009 at 0209 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N815MA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Santo Domingo - Wilmington
MSN:
550-0406
YOM:
1982
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6914
Captain / Total hours on type:
1400.00
Aircraft flight hours:
11123
Circumstances:
During a night, northbound, international over water flight that paralleled the east coast of the southeast United States, the airplane encountered headwinds. Upon arrival at the intended destination, the weather was below forecasted conditions, resulting in multiple instrument approach attempts. After the first missed approach, the controller advised the crew that there was an airport 36 miles to the north with "much better" weather, but the crew declined, citing a need to clear customs. During the third missed approach, the left engine lost power, and while the airplane was being vectored for a fourth approach, the right engine lost power. Utilizing the global positioning system, the captain pointed the airplane toward the intersection of the airport's two runways. Approximately 50 feet above the ground, he saw runway lights, and landed. The captain attempted to lower the landing gear prior to the landing, but it would not extend due to a lack of hydraulic pressure from the loss of engine power, and the alternate gear extension would not have been completed in time. The gear up landing resulted in damage to the underside of the fuselage and punctures of the pressure vessel. The captain stated that the airplane arrived in the vicinity of the destination with about 1,000 pounds of fuel on board or 55 minutes of fuel remaining. However, air traffic and cockpit voice recordings revealed that the right engine lost power about 14 minutes after arrival, and the left engine, about 20 minutes after arrival. Federal air regulations require, for an instrument flight rules flight plan, that an airplane carry enough fuel to complete the flight to the first airport of landing, fly from that airport to an alternate, and fly after that for 45 minutes at normal cruising speed. The loss of engine power was due to fuel exhaustion, with no preaccident mechanical anomalies noted to the airplane.
Probable cause:
A loss of engine power due to the crew's inadequate in-flight fuel monitoring.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air 90 in Mount Airy: 6 killed

Date & Time: Feb 1, 2008 at 1130 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N57WR
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Cedartown-Mount Airy
MSN:
LJ-1678
YOM:
2005
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6

Crash of a Cessna 500 Citation in Greensboro

Date & Time: Feb 1, 2006 at 1145 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N814ER
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Asheville-Greensboro
MSN:
500-0280
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2500
Captain / Total hours on type:
700.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
13000
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1000
Aircraft flight hours:
12008
Circumstances:

Before leaving Asheville-Piedmont Triad airport, the crew noticed technical problem with the landing gear system. He decided to fly to Greensboro where better facilities to handle situation were available. On landing, the right main landing gear collapsed. The aircraft veered off the right side of the runway and came to rest into the grass. All four occupants escaped without injury but the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Fokker F27 in Kinston

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2003 at 1027 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N712FE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Greensboro-New Bern
MSN:
10613
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
8130
Captain / Total hours on type:
1450.00
Aircraft flight hours:
26665
Aircraft flight cycles:
28285
Circumstances:
After landing gear problems, the crew elected to divert to Kinston-Regional Jetport airport. On landing, right main gear failed and the aircraft came ot rest on runway. Both pilots escaped uninjured but the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Beechcraft 1900D in Charlotte: 21 killed

Date & Time: Jan 8, 2003 at 0849 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N233YV
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Charlotte-Greenville
MSN:
UE-233
YOM:
1996
Flight number:
US5481
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
19
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
21
Captain / Total flying hours:
2790
Captain / Total hours on type:
1100.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
706
Copilot / Total hours on type:
706
Aircraft flight hours:
15003
Aircraft flight cycles:
21332
Circumstances:
After liftoff, the commuter banked left and crashed onto a hangar. NTSB suspected technical problem with elevator control system which was replaced two days before the accident.