code

NE

Crash of a Beechcraft C99 in Hastings

Date & Time: Mar 16, 2018 at 0750 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N213AV
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Omaha – Hastings
MSN:
U-213
YOM:
1983
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6500
Captain / Total hours on type:
1145.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
853
Copilot / Total hours on type:
21
Aircraft flight hours:
17228
Circumstances:
According to the operator's director of safety, during landing in gusty crosswind conditions, the multi-engine, turbine-powered airplane bounced. The airplane then touched down a second time left of the runway centerline. "Recognizing their position was too far left," the flight crew attempted a go-around. However, both engines were almost at idle and "took time to spool back up." Without the appropriate airspeed, the airplane continued to veer to the left. A gust under the right wing "drove" the left wing into the ground. The airplane continued across a grass field, the nose landing gear collapsed, and the airplane slid to a stop. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and left wing. The director of safety reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The automated weather observation system located at the accident airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 110° at 21 knots, gusting to 35 knots. The pilot landed on runway 04. The Beechcraft airplane flight manual states the max demonstrated crosswind is 25 knots. Based on the stated wind conditions, the calculated crosswind component was 19 to 33 knots.
Probable cause:
The pilot's decision to land in a gusty crosswind that exceeded the airplane's maximum demonstrated crosswind and resulted in a runway excursion.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-40 Solitaire in Ainsworth: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 23, 2017 at 1028 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N73MA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Ainsworth – Bottineau
MSN:
414
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3775
Captain / Total hours on type:
2850.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5383
Circumstances:
The instrument-rated private pilot departed on a cross-country flight in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) with an overcast cloud layer at 500 ft above ground level (agl)
and visibility restricted to 1 ¾ miles in mist, without receiving an instrument clearance or opening his filed instrument flight rules flight plan. There was an outage of the ground communications system at the airport and there was no evidence that the pilot attempted to open his flight plan via his cellular telephone. In addition, there was a low-level outage of the radar services in the vicinity of the accident site and investigators were unable to determine the airplane's route of flight before impact. The airport manager observed the accident airplane depart from runway 35 and enter the clouds. Witnesses located to the north of the accident site did not see the airplane but reported hearing an airplane depart about the time of the accident. One witness reported hearing a lowflying airplane and commented that the engines sounded as if they were operating at full power. The witness heard a thud as he was walking into his home but attributed it to a thunderstorm in the area. The airplane impacted a field about 3.5 miles to the northeast of the departure end of the runway and off the track for the intended route of flight. The airplane was massively fragmented during the impact and debris was scattered for about 300 ft. The damage to the airplane and ground scars at the accident site were consistent with the airplane impacting in a left wing low, nose low attitude with relatively high energy. A postaccident examination of the engines and propeller assemblies did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Signatures were consistent with both engines producing power and both propellers developing thrust at the time of impact. While the massive fragmentation precluded functional testing of the equipment, there was no damage or failure that suggested preimpact anomalies with the airframe or flight controls.Several days before the accident flight, the pilot encountered a "transient flag" on the air data attitude heading reference system. The pilot reported the flag to both the co-owner of the airplane and an avionics shop; however, exact details of the flag are not known. The unit was destroyed by impact forces and could not be functionally tested. If the flag affecting the display of attitude information had occurred with the unit after takeoff, the instrument panel had adequate stand-by instrumentation from which the pilot could have continued the flight. It is not known if this unit failed during the takeoff and investigators were unable to determine what role, if any, this transient issue may have played in the accident. Based upon the reported weather conditions, the location of the wreckage, and the attitude of the airplane at the time of impact with the ground, it is likely that the pilot experienced spatial disorientation shortly after takeoff which resulted in a loss of control and descent into terrain.
Probable cause:
The pilot's loss of airplane control due to spatial disorientation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-46-500TP Meridian in Omaha: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 10, 2015 at 1153 LT
Registration:
N145JR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Omaha - Trinidad
MSN:
46-97166
YOM:
2003
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4840
Captain / Total hours on type:
280.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1047
Circumstances:
The private pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight. Shortly after takeoff, the pilot told the air traffic controller that he needed to return to the airport due to an attitude heading reference system (AHRS) "miscommunication." Air traffic control radar data indicated that, at that time, the airplane was about 1.75 miles north of the airport on a southeasterly course about 2,000 ft. mean sea level. About 20 seconds after the pilot requested to return to the airport, the airplane began to descend. The airplane subsequently entered a right turn, which appeared to continue until the final radar data point. The airplane struck power lines about 3/4 of a mile from the airport while maneuvering within the traffic pattern. The power lines were about 75 ft. above ground level. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. Although the pilot reported a flight instrumentation issue to air traffic control, the investigation was unable to confirm whether such an anomaly occurred based on component testing and available information. Examination of the standby airspeed indicator revealed that the link arm had separated from the pin on the rocking shaft assembly; however, it likely separated during the accident sequence. No other anomalies were observed. Functional testing indicated that the standby airspeed indicator was likely functional and providing accurate airspeed information to the pilot throughout the flight. Finally, examination of the left and right annunciator panel bulb filaments associated with the left fuel pump advisory revealed that they were stretched, indicating that the left fuel pump advisory indication annunciated at the time of the accident; however, this likely occurred during the accident sequence as a result of an automatic attempt to activate the left fuel pump due to the loss of fuel pressure immediately after the left wing separated. Toxicology testing of the pilot detected low levels of three different sedating antihistamines; however, antemortem levels could not be determined nor could the underlying reason(s) for the pilot's use of these medications. As a result, it could not be determined whether pilot impairment occurred due to the use of the medications or the underlying condition(s) themselves. Although the pilot reported a flight instrumentation issue, this problem would not have affected his ability to control the airplane. Further, the pilot should have been able to see the power lines given the day/visual weather conditions. It is possible that the pilot become distracted by the noncritical anomaly, which resulted in his failure to maintain clearance from the power lines.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from power lines while returning to the airport after becoming distracted by a noncritical flight instrumentation anomaly indication.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft UC-45J Expeditor in Verdel: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 18, 2009 at 1905 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N6688
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
7085
YOM:
1944
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The private pilot/owner and a passenger were transporting the pilot's multi-engine airplane to another airport so it could undergo an annual inspection. Shortly after departure, the right engine began to vibrate violently and the pilot elected to make a forced landing to a pasture. The airplane caught on fire and both radial engines separated from the airframe and sustained impact damage. The pilot was not rated by the FAA to operate multi-engine airplanes and he had not received any formal training in the airplane. The accident flight was his first time flying the airplane by himself. The airplane had not received an annual inspection in approximately 8 years prior to the accident. Examination of the right engine revealed extensive mechanical damage possibly due to a connecting rod failure.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper decision to fly an airplane that was not airworthy and for which he was not properly rated to operate, and his failure to maintain control of the airplane during a forced landing to a field following an engine failure. Contributing to the accident was the failed cylinder connecting rod.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Alliance

Date & Time: Feb 8, 2007 at 0225 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1116Y
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Omaha - Alliance
MSN:
208-0368
YOM:
1993
Flight number:
SUB022
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3232
Captain / Total hours on type:
226.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7248
Circumstances:
The pilot was dispatched on a nonscheduled cargo flight to an airport other than his usual destination because it had a precision instrument approach, while his usual destination airport did not. The pilot elected to fly to his usual airport, and attempted a non precision instrument approach. The airport had both a VOR and an NDB approach. The NDB approach was noted as being out of service, although there was still a radio signal coming from the navigation aid. The pilot was cleared for the VOR approach, although instrumentation inside the cockpit was found set for the NDB approach, and radar track data disclosed that the flight path was consistent with the NDB approach path, not the VOR's. The airport's reported weather was 1.25 miles visibility, with a 200-foot overcast in mist. The airport's minimum NDB approach altitude is 652 feet above touchdown height. The airplane did not reach the runway, and collided with a pole and a building. Inspection of the airplane disclosed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions.
Probable cause:
The pilot's descent below minimum descent altitude while on a non precision approach. A contributing factor was a low ceiling.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 551 Citation II/SP in Ainsworth

Date & Time: Jan 1, 2005 at 1120 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N35403
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Reading - Ainsworth
MSN:
551-0029
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2200
Captain / Total hours on type:
475.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5870
Circumstances:
The twin-engine corporate jet impacted terrain while maneuvering to land after a global positioning system (GPS) approach. The pilot reported that the airplane entered icing conditions during the approach and that the airplane descended out of instrument meteorological conditions between 300-400 feet above ground level (agl). The pilot reported that his windshield had become obscured by ice accumulation during the approach and that he "had difficulty seeing the runway." The pilot elected to land the airplane instead of executing the published missed-approach procedure. The airplane impacted terrain 439 feet short of the runway threshold while in a right turn. After the accident, there was ice accumulation on all booted airframe surfaces measuring 2-4 inches wide and 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick. The upper portions of the windscreens were contaminated with ice measuring about 3/8 inch thick. The remaining airframe portions, including the heated surfaces, were free of ice accumulation. The windshield bleed air switch was selected on "High" with the pilot's side windshield heat control knob approximately mid-range. Windshield alcohol was selected "On", but the alcohol reservoir was still full upon inspection. At the time of the accident, there was an overcast ceiling of 500 feet agl, 1-3/4 statute mile visibility with mist, and an outside temperature of -08 degrees Celsius. The published minimum descent altitude (MDA) for the GPS runway 17 approach is 500 feet agl, for an airplane equipped with a lateral navigation only GPS receiver. The pilot held a private pilot certificate with multi-engine land, instrument airplane, and Cessna 500 type rating. The pilot reported having 2,200 hours total flight time and 475 hours in the same make/model as the accident airplane.
Probable cause:
The pilot's decision to continue below the minimum descent altitude (MDA) and his failure to fly the published missed-approach procedure. A factor to the accident was the pilot's improper use of windshield heat which resulted in the windshield becoming obscured with ice during the instrument approach in icing conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in North Platte

Date & Time: May 28, 1998 at 1300 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N888AA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
North Platte - Kearney
MSN:
414-0468
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2353
Captain / Total hours on type:
312.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6159
Circumstances:
The airplane had just taken off and was at approximately 300 agl when the right engine 'had a sudden and catastrophic failure.' The right propeller stopped spinning with the blades in the low-pitch position. The pilot initiated a right turn back toward the airport, but the airplane would not maintain altitude. The pilot rolled out of the turn, but the descent continued until the airplane struck the trees. Examination of the airplane's right engine revealed that the crankshaft was broken at the number 3 short cheek, just forward of the number two cylinder piston rod. The number two crankshaft bearing was broken and melted. The oil feed line to the number two bearing was blocked by a piece of the broken bearing. The Single Engine Climb Data table in the Cessna 414 Pilot's Operating Handbook indicates that an airplane weighing 5,680 pounds, with gear and flaps retracted and the inoperative propeller in feather, operating at a density altitude of 5,055 feet, will have a best climb indicated airspeed of 115 knots. The rate of climb will be 308 feet per minute.
Probable cause:
The slipped number two bearing in the airplane's right engine, which blocked the bearing's oil feed line, causing the bearing and the crankshaft to overheat and fracture. A factor contributing to this accident was the trees.
Final Report:

Crash of a Canadair CL-601-3A Challenger in Bassett

Date & Time: Mar 20, 1994 at 0036 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N88HA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lawrence – Burlington – Long Beach
MSN:
5072
YOM:
1990
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
7110
Captain / Total hours on type:
2570.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1109
Circumstances:
The pilots flew to Lawrence, MA to refuel for the return flight back to the west coast. They stated the fuel truck malfunctioned and stopped after it had pumped about 221 gallons into the airplane. They were warned about possible fuel contamination, but they reported sump samples did not reveal abnormal amounts of water. The pilots observed erroneous fuel totalizer indications during the low alt flight to Burlington, VT, where they topped off with fuel. The flight crew stated while in cruise flight at FL410, the left engine low fuel pressure light illuminated. Sometime later, the left engine lost power, followed by a loss of power in the right engine. Numerous restart attempts on both engines and the apu were unsuccessful. The pilots maneuvered towards the nearest airport, but were unable to visually identify the runway in time to land on it. The airplane touched down in a field, striking an irrigation structure and trees. Water-contaminated fuel was found in the fuel tanks, fuel filters, and throughout the fuel system.
Probable cause:
The pilot in command's inadequate planning/decision making and inadequate preflight inspection after receiving a load of contaminated fuel. Related factors are the contaminated fuel, improper refueling by FBO personnel, and the dark night light conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in McCook: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 26, 1994 at 1515 LT
Registration:
N5468G
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Denver - Columbus
MSN:
421C-0215
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2550
Captain / Total hours on type:
66.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5837
Circumstances:
The part 135 on-demand air taxi flight departed Denver, Colorado, with a destination of Columbus, Nebraska. Weather forecasts were for icing conditions along the entire route of flight. While en route, ATC advised the pilot of reported icing ahead. The pilot was cleared to climb to 19,000 feet to get on top of the clouds. The pilot reported 'some alternator problems,' and requested to divert to North Platte, Nebraska. He then elected to divert to McCook, Nebraska, due to the weather at North Platte. ATC lost communication with the pilot during the diversion. Witnesses reported the airplane circled the McCook Airport twice. According to them, the airplane entered a bank of about 45°, then stalled. Subsequently, it traveled about 190 feet through a stand of trees before coming to rest. Witnesses reported the airplane was covered with ice. One-half inch of mixed ice was found on a piece of windshield. Both alternators had one phase in the stator winding shorted.
Probable cause:
Improper in-flight planning/decision by the pilot, and the accumulation of airframe ice, which resulted in an inadvertent stall. Factors associated with the accident were: partial failure of both alternators, which resulted in a subsequent electrical system failure and an inoperative anti-ice/de-ice system, adverse weather (icing) conditions, and airframe (wing) ice.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Grand Commander 690A in Norfolk: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jul 30, 1993 at 1700 LT
Registration:
N707BP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Mountain Home - Norfolk
MSN:
690-11326
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
17770
Captain / Total hours on type:
414.00
Circumstances:
The Rockwell 690A, N707BP, was flying a straight-in entry to a downwind leg for runway 19 at the non-controlled airport. The only radio call heard from the Rockwell was a request for an airport advisory when it was about 20 miles southeast. The Piper PA-28R, N33056, had departed from runway 19. No radio calls were heard from the Piper. Witnesses observed the Rockwell heading north and the Piper heading east moments before the collision. The witnesses stated the Piper pitched up and banked steeply moments before the collision. The collision occurred approximately 2 miles east-southeast of the airport. On-scene investigation showed that the Piper's left main landing gear tire had made an imprint on the bottom of the Rockwell's outboard left wing. Paint color from the Rockwell had transferred to the Piper's left wing skin. All six people in both aircraft were killed.
Probable cause:
The failure of the pilots of the Rockwell 690A, N707BP, and the Piper PA28R, N33056, to see and avoid each other. A factor which contributed to the accident was the failure of both pilot's to follow recommended communication procedures contained in the airman's information manual for operating at an airport without an operating control tower.
Final Report: