code

NE

Crash of a Beechcraft C99 in Hastings

Date & Time: Mar 16, 2018 at 0750 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N213AV
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Omaha – Hastings
MSN:
U-213
YOM:
1983
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6500
Captain / Total hours on type:
1145.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
853
Copilot / Total hours on type:
21
Aircraft flight hours:
17228
Circumstances:
According to the operator's director of safety, during landing in gusty crosswind conditions, the multi-engine, turbine-powered airplane bounced. The airplane then touched down a second time left of the runway centerline. "Recognizing their position was too far left," the flight crew attempted a go-around. However, both engines were almost at idle and "took time to spool back up." Without the appropriate airspeed, the airplane continued to veer to the left. A gust under the right wing "drove" the left wing into the ground. The airplane continued across a grass field, the nose landing gear collapsed, and the airplane slid to a stop. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and left wing. The director of safety reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The automated weather observation system located at the accident airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 110° at 21 knots, gusting to 35 knots. The pilot landed on runway 04. The Beechcraft airplane flight manual states the max demonstrated crosswind is 25 knots. Based on the stated wind conditions, the calculated crosswind component was 19 to 33 knots.
Probable cause:
The pilot's decision to land in a gusty crosswind that exceeded the airplane's maximum demonstrated crosswind and resulted in a runway excursion.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-40 Solitaire in Ainsworth: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 23, 2017 at 1028 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N73MA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Ainsworth – Bottineau
MSN:
414
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3775
Captain / Total hours on type:
2850.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5383
Circumstances:
The instrument-rated private pilot departed on a cross-country flight in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) with an overcast cloud layer at 500 ft above ground level (agl)
and visibility restricted to 1 ¾ miles in mist, without receiving an instrument clearance or opening his filed instrument flight rules flight plan. There was an outage of the ground communications system at the airport and there was no evidence that the pilot attempted to open his flight plan via his cellular telephone. In addition, there was a low-level outage of the radar services in the vicinity of the accident site and investigators were unable to determine the airplane's route of flight before impact. The airport manager observed the accident airplane depart from runway 35 and enter the clouds. Witnesses located to the north of the accident site did not see the airplane but reported hearing an airplane depart about the time of the accident. One witness reported hearing a lowflying airplane and commented that the engines sounded as if they were operating at full power. The witness heard a thud as he was walking into his home but attributed it to a thunderstorm in the area. The airplane impacted a field about 3.5 miles to the northeast of the departure end of the runway and off the track for the intended route of flight. The airplane was massively fragmented during the impact and debris was scattered for about 300 ft. The damage to the airplane and ground scars at the accident site were consistent with the airplane impacting in a left wing low, nose low attitude with relatively high energy. A postaccident examination of the engines and propeller assemblies did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Signatures were consistent with both engines producing power and both propellers developing thrust at the time of impact. While the massive fragmentation precluded functional testing of the equipment, there was no damage or failure that suggested preimpact anomalies with the airframe or flight controls.Several days before the accident flight, the pilot encountered a "transient flag" on the air data attitude heading reference system. The pilot reported the flag to both the co-owner of the airplane and an avionics shop; however, exact details of the flag are not known. The unit was destroyed by impact forces and could not be functionally tested. If the flag affecting the display of attitude information had occurred with the unit after takeoff, the instrument panel had adequate stand-by instrumentation from which the pilot could have continued the flight. It is not known if this unit failed during the takeoff and investigators were unable to determine what role, if any, this transient issue may have played in the accident. Based upon the reported weather conditions, the location of the wreckage, and the attitude of the airplane at the time of impact with the ground, it is likely that the pilot experienced spatial disorientation shortly after takeoff which resulted in a loss of control and descent into terrain.
Probable cause:
The pilot's loss of airplane control due to spatial disorientation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-46-500TP Meridian in Omaha: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 10, 2015 at 1153 LT
Registration:
N145JR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Omaha - Trinidad
MSN:
46-97166
YOM:
2003
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4840
Captain / Total hours on type:
280.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1047
Circumstances:
The private pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight. Shortly after takeoff, the pilot told the air traffic controller that he needed to return to the airport due to an attitude heading reference system (AHRS) "miscommunication." Air traffic control radar data indicated that, at that time, the airplane was about 1.75 miles north of the airport on a southeasterly course about 2,000 ft. mean sea level. About 20 seconds after the pilot requested to return to the airport, the airplane began to descend. The airplane subsequently entered a right turn, which appeared to continue until the final radar data point. The airplane struck power lines about 3/4 of a mile from the airport while maneuvering within the traffic pattern. The power lines were about 75 ft. above ground level. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. Although the pilot reported a flight instrumentation issue to air traffic control, the investigation was unable to confirm whether such an anomaly occurred based on component testing and available information. Examination of the standby airspeed indicator revealed that the link arm had separated from the pin on the rocking shaft assembly; however, it likely separated during the accident sequence. No other anomalies were observed. Functional testing indicated that the standby airspeed indicator was likely functional and providing accurate airspeed information to the pilot throughout the flight. Finally, examination of the left and right annunciator panel bulb filaments associated with the left fuel pump advisory revealed that they were stretched, indicating that the left fuel pump advisory indication annunciated at the time of the accident; however, this likely occurred during the accident sequence as a result of an automatic attempt to activate the left fuel pump due to the loss of fuel pressure immediately after the left wing separated. Toxicology testing of the pilot detected low levels of three different sedating antihistamines; however, antemortem levels could not be determined nor could the underlying reason(s) for the pilot's use of these medications. As a result, it could not be determined whether pilot impairment occurred due to the use of the medications or the underlying condition(s) themselves. Although the pilot reported a flight instrumentation issue, this problem would not have affected his ability to control the airplane. Further, the pilot should have been able to see the power lines given the day/visual weather conditions. It is possible that the pilot become distracted by the noncritical anomaly, which resulted in his failure to maintain clearance from the power lines.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from power lines while returning to the airport after becoming distracted by a noncritical flight instrumentation anomaly indication.
Final Report:

Mislanding of a Beechcraft 99 in Kerney

Date & Time: Jan 6, 2010 at 0635 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N206AV
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Omaha - Kerney
MSN:
U-206
YOM:
1983
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1300
Captain / Total hours on type:
216.00
Aircraft flight hours:
33106
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that the airplane picked up light to moderate icing on approach to land and that he cycled the deicing boots once prior to the final approach fix. The pilot was established on the instrument landing system approach when he broke out of the weather about 250 feet above ground level. He estimated that the approach brought the airplane 60 feet right of the runway center line so he made a correction to align the airplane with the runway. When the airplane returned to level flight and was about 25 feet above the runway, the left wing stalled and the airplane landed hard on the left main landing gear, bending the rear spar of the left wing. During the post accident inspection of the airplane, ice was noted on the wings and deicing boots. The pilot did not recall the stall warning horn activating during the approach. The stall warning horn’s circuit breaker was found to be tripped during the post accident inspection. The cause of the tripped circuit breaker could not be determined. An examination of the remaining systems revealed no anomalies.
Probable cause:
The failure of the pilot to maintain adequate airspeed during the approach resulting in a stall. Contributing to the accident was the accumulation of structural icing during the flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan in Alliance

Date & Time: Feb 8, 2007 at 0225 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1116Y
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Omaha - Scottsbluff
MSN:
208-0368
YOM:
1993
Flight number:
SUB022
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3232
Captain / Total hours on type:
226.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7248
Circumstances:
Flight SUB022 from Omaha approached Alliance airport by night. At this time, visibility was estimated one mile due to mist and overcast 200 feet. On final approach, the single engine aircraft hit successively a private building and a telephone pole and crashed. The pilot, sole occupant, was injured while the aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of a Cessna 551 Citation II in Ainsworth

Date & Time: Jan 1, 2005 at 1120 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N35403
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Reading-Ainsworth
MSN:
551-0029
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2200
Captain / Total hours on type:
475.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5870
Circumstances:

The aircraft was carrying 5 passengers and a pilot from Reading (Pennsylvania) to Ainsworth, Nebraska. While descending to 4,000 feet, the airplane encountered ice and descended out of IMC between 300 and 400 feet. On final approach, the aircraft touch the ground near runway 17 threshold, bounced and eventually came to rest 700 feet further on a parallel access road. Only two passengers reported minor injuries. The aircraft was written off. It seems that the windshield was obscured by ice during descent, reducing pilot's visibility.

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in North Platte

Date & Time: May 28, 1998 at 1300 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N888AA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
North Platte-Kearney
MSN:
414-0468
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2353
Captain / Total hours on type:
312.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6159

Crash of a Canadair CL-601 Challenger in Bassett

Date & Time: Mar 20, 1994 at 0036 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N88HA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lawrence-Burlington-Long Beach
MSN:
5072
YOM:
1990
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
7110
Captain / Total hours on type:
2570.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1109

Crash of a Cessna 421 Golden Eagle in Nebraska: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 26, 1994 at 1515 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N5468G
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Denver-Columbus
MSN:
421-0215
YOM:
1972
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2550
Captain / Total hours on type:
66.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5837

Crash of a Beechcraft 99 in Grand Island: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 28, 1993 at 2350 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N115GP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Grand Island-Grand Island
MSN:
U-228
YOM:
1986
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
5611
Captain / Total hours on type:
2200.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6962