code

AZ

Crash of a Beechcraft Super King Air 300 in Tucson: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 23, 2017 at 1235 LT
Operator: KAAZ LLC (40152)">
Registration:
N385KA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tucson - Tucson
MSN:
FA-42
YOM:
1985
Location: Tucson (27254)"> Arizona (13854)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Just after liftoff from runway 11L, the twin engine aircraft banked left and hit the ground with its left wingtip. Out of control, the airplane crashed on the apron and eventually came to rest in flames against a concrete wall located in front of the main terminal. The aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire and both occupants were killed. It was reported the aircraft has just been sold to a new owner who was apparently performing a control flight in the Tucson area.

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 500S in Fort Huachuca

Date & Time: May 17, 2014 at 1000 LT
Operator: Ponderosa Aviation (37084)">
Registration:
N40TC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
3091
YOM:
1976
Location: Fort Huachuca (19917)"> Arizona (13854)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Fort Huachuca Airport, aircraft went out of control and crashed in a desert area. Both occupants were injured while the aircraft was partially destroyed.

Crash of a Cessna T207A Turbo Stationair 7 in Page: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 10, 2014 at 1539 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 207 Skywagon (30272)">
Operator: American Aviation (1983) (39510)">
Registration:
N7311U
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Page - Page
MSN:
207A-0395
YOM:
1977
Location: Page (24340)"> Arizona (13854)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful sightseeing flight over the Grand Canyon and Lake Powell, the single engine was returning to its base in Page. On final approach in windy conditions, aircraft went out of control and crashed upside down some 400-500 feet short of runway. A 79 years old female passenger was killed while five others were injured, including the pilot. A passenger was unhurt. All passengers were French tourists.

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air E90 in Casa Grande: 2 killed

Date & Time: Feb 6, 2013 at 1135 LT
Type of aircraft: Beechcraft King Air 90 (29733)">
Operator: Tucson Aeroservice Center (37221)">
Registration:
N555FV
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Marana - Casa Grande
MSN:
LW-248
YOM:
1977
Location: Casa Grande (18354)"> Arizona (13854)">
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Twin engine aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and post impact fire when it collided with the terrain while maneuvering at the Casa Grande Airport (CGZ), Casa Grande, Arizona. The private pilot, who occupied the left pilot seat, and the certified flight instructor, who occupied the right pilot seat, sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The reported local instructional flight was conducted in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The flight departed the Marana Regional Airport (AVQ), Marana, Arizona, about 1030. In a conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC), a line service person who assisted the pilot in preparing the airplane for the flight reported that the pilot mentioned to him that he and the flight instructor were going up to practice some maneuvers. Additionally, a family member reported to the IIC that the pilot was going to CGZ to practice touch-and-go takeoffs and landings. Several witnesses reported that they observed the airplane over runway 05 in an extremely steep bank angle to the left and in a severely nose down attitude prior to impact with terrain. Two witnesses reported that the airplane was about 200 to 300 feet above the ground when it entered the steep descent. An onsite examination of the wreckage by the NTSB and representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration revealed that the initial point of impact occurred about 100 feet north of the midfield point of runway 05. After initial ground contact with the left wing, the airplane then cartwheeled in a northwesterly direction for about 50 feet before coming to rest upright and oriented on a southeasterly heading, which was perpendicular to and facing runway 05. A fire, which erupted immediately following impact, consumed various sections of the airplane. The examination further revealed that all major components necessary for flight were accounted for at the accident site.

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in Payson: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 18, 2012 at 1825 LT
Operator: Ameriflight (31509)">
Registration:
N62959
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Holbrook - Payson - Phoenix
MSN:
31-7752008
YOM:
1977
Flight number:
AMF3853
Location: Payson (24515)"> Arizona (13854)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1908
Captain / Total hours on type:
346.00
Circumstances:
On December 18, 2012, about 1825 mountain standard time, a Piper PA-31-350, N62959, was lost from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) radio and radar contact about 10 miles southwest of Payson, Arizona, during an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight to Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport (PHX), Phoenix, Arizona. The wreckage was located the following day; the pilot had received fatal injuries. The flight was being operated as Ameriflight 3853 as a cargo flight for United Parcel Service (UPS), and was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed in the vicinity at the time contact with the airplane was lost. According to information from representatives of Ameriflight and UPS, the flight departed Holbrook Municipal Airport (P14), Holbrook, Arizona, about its scheduled time of 1700, with a scheduled arrival time of 1730 at Payson Airport (PAN), Payson. According to the driver of the UPS truck who was at PAN and was scheduled to meet the flight, he never saw or heard the airplane. The driver left PAN about 20 minutes after the flight was due. According to FAA air traffic control (ATC) information, the flight's first ATC contact was with Albuquerque air route traffic control center about 1812, when the airplane was at an altitude of 13,800 feet; the pilot requested a clearance to PHX. The flight was assigned a discrete transponder code, radar identified, and then instructed to proceed "direct" to PHX. The flight was instructed to be at 10,000 feet when it was 40 miles from PHX. Shortly after the airplane reached the assigned altitude, the pilot requested a lower altitude; his request was denied due to ATC minimum vectoring altitude limitations. Shortly thereafter, radio and radar contact was lost. The last primary radar target associated with the airplane was recorded at 1824:33, at a location of N34º 06.4794' by W111º 28.2604'. Weather conditions in the area precluded an aerial search until the following day. About 0950 MST on December 19, 2012, the wreckage was located at the same approximate latitude/longitude as the last radar target associated with the airplane, at an approximate elevation of about 7,000 feet. The accident site was located about 12.4 miles, on a true bearing of about 213 degrees, from PAN.

Crash of a Rockwell Grand Commander 690A in Mesa: 6 killed

Date & Time: Nov 23, 2011 at 1831 LT
Operator: Ponderosa Aviation (37084)">
Registration:
N690SM
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Mesa - Safford
MSN:
690-11337
YOM:
1976
Location: Mesa (22988)"> Arizona (13854)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
2500
Captain / Total hours on type:
951.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8188
Circumstances:
On November 23, 2011, about 1831 mountain standard time, a Rockwell International (Aero Commander) 690A airplane, N690SM, was destroyed when it impacted terrain in the Superstition Mountains near Apache Junction, Arizona. The commercial pilot and the five passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Ponderosa Aviation, Inc. (PAI) and operated by PAI under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The airplane had departed Falcon Field (FFZ), Mesa, Arizona, about 1825 and was destined for Safford Regional Airport (SAD), Safford, Arizona. PAI’s director of maintenance (DOM) and the director of operations (DO), who were co owners of PAI along with the president, conducted a personal flight from SAD to FFZ. The DO flew the leg from SAD to FFZ under visual flight rules (VFR) in night VMC. After arriving at FFZ and in preparation for the flight back to SAD, the DOM moved to the left front seat to act as the pilot flying. The airplane departed FFZ about 12 minutes after it arrived. According to a witness, engine start and taxi-out appeared normal. Review of the recorded communications between the pilot and the FFZ tower air traffic controllers revealed that when the pilot requested taxi clearance, he advised the ground controller that he was planning an "eastbound departure." The flight was cleared for takeoff on runway 4R, and the pilot was instructed to maintain runway heading until advised, due to an inbound aircraft. About 90 seconds later, when the airplane was about 1.1 miles from the departure end of the runway, the tower local controller issued a "right turn approved" advisory to the flight, which the pilot acknowledged. Radar data revealed that the airplane flew the runway heading for about 1.5 miles then began a right turn toward SAD and climbed through an altitude of about 2,600 feet mean sea level (msl). About 1828, after it momentarily climbed to an altitude of 4,700 feet, the airplane descended to an altitude of 4,500 feet, where it remained and tracked in an essentially straight line until it impacted the mountain. The last radar return was received at 1830:56 and was approximately coincident with the impact location. The impact location was near the top of a steep mountain that projected to over 5,000 feet msl. Witnesses reported seeing a fireball, and law enforcement helicopters were dispatched.

Crash of an Embraer Phenom 100 in Sedona

Date & Time: May 25, 2011 at 1550 LT
Operator: JetSuite (37212)">
Registration:
N224MD
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San Jose - Sedona
MSN:
500-00057
YOM:
2009
Flight number:
RSP240
Location: Sedona (26036)"> Arizona (13854)">
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful flight, the flight crew briefed the arrival to the destination airport and set the calculated landing speeds. The captain and the first officer reported that during final approach, it felt like the airplane was “pushed up” as the wind shifted to a tailwind or updraft before landing near the runway number markings. Upon touchdown, the captain applied the brakes and thought that the initial braking was effective; however, he noticed the airplane was not slowing down. The captain applied maximum braking, and the airplane began to veer to the right; he was able to correct back to the runway centerline, but the airplane subsequently exited the departure end of the runway and traveled down a steep embankment. A pilot-rated passenger reported that throughout the approach to landing, he thought the airplane was high and thought that the excessive altitude continued through and into the base-to-final turn. He added that the bank angle of this turn seemed greater than 45 degrees. Recorded communication from the cockpit voice and data recorder (CVDR) revealed that during the approach to landing, the flight crew performed the landing checks, and the captain noted difficulty judging the approach. About 1 minute later, the recording revealed that the ground warning proximity system reported “five hundred” followed by a “sink rate, pull up” alert about 16 seconds later. Data from the CVDR revealed that about 23 seconds before weight-on-wheels was recorded, the airplane was at an indicated airspeed of about 124 knots and descending. The data showed that this approximate airspeed was maintained until about 3 seconds before weight-on-wheels. The recorded data further showed that the approach speed was set to 120 knots, and the landing reference speed (vREF) was set to 97 knots. Using the reported airplane configuration and the 3.5-knot headwind that was reported at the time of the approach and landing, calculations indicate that the vREF speed should have been about 101 knots indicated airspeed, which would have required a landing distance of about 3,112 feet. Utilizing the same airplane configuration and wind condition with the flight’s reported 124 knot indicated airspeed just before touchdown, the landing distance was calculated to be about 5,624 feet. The intended runway for landing was 5,132-feet long with a 1.9 percent downward slope gradient, and a 123-foot long overrun area. A postaccident examination of the airplane, including the braking system, revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot misjudged the airplane’s speed during the final approach, which resulted in runway overrun.
Causes:
The pilots’ unstabilized approach and excessive airspeed during approach, which resulted in an insufficient landing distance to stop the airplane before overrunning the runway.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-42 Cheyenne in Prescott: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 18, 2006 at 1347 LT
Type of aircraft: Piper PA-42 Cheyenne (29721)">
Operator: Flying Moose (35838)">
Registration:
N121CS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Prescott-Prescott
MSN:
42-8001032
YOM:
1981
Location: Prescott (24953)"> Arizona (13854)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
4363
Aircraft flight hours:
5317
Circumstances:

The PA-42 departed Prescott for a local flight with 4 pax and one pilot on board. The team has to perform a movie of the MiG-21 fighter aircraft. During flight, in unknown circumstances, the twin engine aircraft dived into the ground and burst into flames. All 5 occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan in Globe

Date & Time: Jul 22, 2005 at 0830 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 208 Caravan (29729)">
Registration:
N717BT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Phoenix-Globe-Safford
MSN:
208-0863
YOM:
2000
Location: Globe (20178)"> Arizona (13854)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5545
Captain / Total hours on type:
203.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4461
Circumstances:
After takeoff, enfine problems forced the pilot to make an emergency landing off airport. The pilot was injured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. A turbine blade broke after departure.

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air 90 in Marble Canyon

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2005 at 1500 LT
Type of aircraft: Beechcraft King Air 90 (29733)">
Operator: Davis Aviation (35699)">
Registration:
N49LL
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Bermuda Dunes-Marble Canyon
MSN:
LJ-1316
YOM:
1992
Location: Marble Canyon (22722)"> Arizona (13854)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2025
Aircraft flight hours:
3655
Circumstances:

On final approach to runway 03, the twin engine aircraft quickly descended into the terrain and crashed. Both occupants were seriously injured.