Crash of a McDonnell Douglas MD-83 in Kiev

Date & Time: Jun 14, 2018 at 2040 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
UR-CPR
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Antalya - Kiev
MSN:
49946/1898
YOM:
1991
Flight number:
BAY4406
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
169
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful charter flight from Antalya, the crew completed the approach to Kiev-Zhuliany-Igor Sikorsky Airport in poor weather conditions with thunderstorm activity, rain showers and turbulences. After touchdown on runway 08, the crew started the braking procedure when the airplane deviated from the centerline and veered off runway to the left. While contacting soft ground, both main landing gears torn off and the airplane slid on a grassy area before coming to rest. All 175 occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was considered as damaged beyond repair. At the time of the accident, wind was gusting to 57 km/h.

Crash of a Cessna 207 Skywagon into Susitna River: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2018 at 1205 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N91038
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
207-0027
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On June 13, 2018, about 1205 Alaska daylight time (AKD), a wheel-equipped Cessna 207 airplane, N91038, and a wheel-equipped Cessna 175 airplane, N9423B, collided midair near the mouth of the Big Susitna River, about 20 miles west of Anchorage, Alaska. The Cessna 207 was being operated as Flight 38 by Spernak Airways, Inc., Anchorage, as a visual flight rules (VFR) scheduled commuter flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135. The Cessna 175 was registered to and operated by the pilot as a VFR personal flight under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91. The commercial pilot of the Cessna 207 was fatally injured. The private pilot of the Cessna 175 was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area at the time of the accident. The Cessna 175 departed a remote fish camp about 1126 AKD en route to the Lake Hood Seaplane Base (PALH) with no flight plan filed. The Cessna 207 departed Merrill Field (PAMR), Anchorage, about 1200 with about 250 pounds of cargo on board, destined for Tyonek (TYE), Alaska, with company flight following procedures in effect. During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-incharge (IIC) on June 14, the pilot of the Cessna 175 stated that while in level cruise flight at an altitude of about 1,000 feet (ft) above mean sea level (msl), he began talking on the radio with the pilot of a Piper Super Cub, which was passing in the opposite direction, to maintain visual separation. He added that, as he watched the Piper Super Cub pass well below his airplane, he noticed the shadow of an opposite direction airplane converging with the shadow of his airplane. Alarmed, he looked forward and saw the spinner of a converging airplane in his windscreen, and he said that he immediately pulled aft on the control yoke. The pilot said that his airplane climbed abruptly just before the two airplanes collided. After the collision, the Cessna 207 descended uncontrolled into the Big Susitna River. He said that, after the collision, he assessed the condition of his airplane and circled over the wreckage of the downed Cessna 207 numerous times, looking for any survivors, marking the location, and using his radio to enlist the help of any pilots in the area. Realizing that no one had escaped the partially sunken wreckage of the Cessna 207, the pilot elected to return to PALH. He said that a Good Samaritan pilot in an airplane responded to his distress calls, flew alongside his damaged airplane, provided him with a damage report, and escorted him back to PALH. A second Good Samaritan pilot in a float-equipped airplane heard multiple distress calls and emergency personnel communications, landed on the river near the partially submerged wreckage, and confirmed that the pilot was deceased. The Cessna 175 pilot subsequently made an emergency landing on Runway 32 at PALH, a 2,200-ft-long, gravel-covered runway. Two NTSB investigators responded to PALH, talked with the Cessna 175 pilot, and examined the wreckage. The Cessna 175's left main landing gear and nosewheel were separated and missing. The right main landing gear tire was cut with features consistent with a propeller strike, and the outboard portion of the right elevator sustained impact damage with red paint transfer. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and right elevator. Due to the location of the wreckage of the Cessna 207 in the silt-laden waters of the Big Susitna River, the NTSB IIC was unable to examine the wreckage at the accident site. An aerial survey of the accident site, which was conducted from an Alaska State Troopers' helicopter, revealed that the wreckage was inverted and partially submerged near the mouth of the river. The left main tire and a portion of the fuselage were protruding from the water. The Cessna 175's left main gear leg with the wheel attached, as well as other wreckage debris, was found on the east bank of the river about 1,380 ft east of the Cessna 207's main wreckage. A preliminary review of archived Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) radar data revealed that, on June 13, about 1203 AKD, two unidentified targets, believed to be the accident airplanes, converged from opposite directions about 1,000 ft msl near the mouth of the river. The data showed that, about 1 minute before the presumed accident time, the westbound target, believed to be the Cessna 207, began a descent to about 874 ft msl then initiated a climb to an altitude of about 900 ft msl just before the targets appeared to merge. That airplane's track disappeared about 1205 AKD. The eastbound target, believed to be the Cessna 175, maintained an altitude of about 1,000 ft msl throughout the sequence. After the targets appeared to merge, the eastbound airplane initiated a climb, returned to the area near wherethe targets converged, and circled for some time before leaving the area. The closest weather reporting facility was at Anchorage International Airport (PANC), Anchorage, Alaska, about 20 miles east of the accident site. At 1153, a METAR from PANC reported, in part: wind from 290° at 5 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, few clouds at 4,500 ft, few clouds at 10,000 ft, scattered clouds at 20,000 ft; temperature, 55° F; dew point 43° F; altimeter, 29.91 inches of mercury. A detailed wreckage examination is pending following recovery.

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader in Batesland

Date & Time: Apr 24, 2018 at 1000 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N9746C
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Aberdeen - Pine Ridge
MSN:
303-00210
YOM:
1983
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
8929
Circumstances:
On April 24, 2018, about 1000 mountain daylight time, a Cessna T303 airplane, N9746C, impacted terrain during an emergency off-airport landing after encountering severe icing conditions near Pine Ridge, South Dakota. The commercial pilot and two passengers sustained minor injuries, and one passenger was not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The airplane was registered to and operated by Aberdeen Flying Service, Aberdeen, South Dakota, as a Title 14 Code of Federal regulations Part 135 ondemand air taxi flight. Day instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight departed Aberdeen Regional Airport (ABR), Aberdeen, about 0930 central daylight time, and was destined for the Pine Ridge Airport (IEN), Pine Ridge, South Dakota. Prior to the flight, the pilot obtained a weather briefing via the company computer system and reviewed the weather information with the company chief pilot. The pilot stated that based on the computer briefing, which did not include icing conditions, he was aware of the forecasted weather conditions along the route of flight and at the intended destination. After takeoff and during the climb to 12,000 ft mean sea level (msl), the airplane encountered light rime ice, and the pilot activated the de-ice equipment with no issues noted with the equipment. After crossing over the Pierre Regional Airport (PIR), Pierre, South Dakota, the pilot heard via the radio reports of better weather at a lower altitude, and the pilot requested a descent to between 5,000 and 6,000 ft. During a descent to 6,000 ft msl, the airplane encountered light to moderate icing conditions. Prior to the descent, the airplane was clear of ice accumulation. The pilot thought about turning back to PIR but could not get clearance until the airplane was closer to IEN due to poor radio coverage. Shortly thereafter, the pilot stated it felt "like a sheet of ice fell on us" as the airplane encountered severe icing conditions. The pilot applied full engine power in an attempt to maintain altitude. The airplane exited the overcast cloud layer about 500 ft above ground level (agl). The pilot decided to execute an off-airport emergency landing because the airplane could not maintain altitude. The airplane touched down in a field about 25 miles from IEN. During the emergency landing, the landing gear separated, and the airplane came to rest upright.The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation, and the airplane was below its maximum gross weight. A review of photograph images obtained by the operator confirmed the airplane retained structural icing after the landing. At 0852, the IEN Automated Surface Observation System (ASOS), located 19 miles westsouthwest of the accident site, reported wind from 350° at 15 knots gusting to 22 knots, 5 miles visibility in unknown precipitation and mist, ceiling overcast at 1,200 ft agl, temperature 2° C, dew point 1° C, altimeter 30.43 inches of mercury (Hg). At 0952, IEN ASOS reported wind from 360° at 11 knots gusting to 20 knots, 6 miles visibility in unknown precipitation and mist, ceiling overcast at 1,300 ft agl, temperature 2° C, dew point 1° C, altimeter 30.45 inches of Hg. The National Weather Service Aviation Weather Center Current Icing Products, which were available online for the preflight briefing, reported the probability of icing at 5,000 ft, 7,000 ft, and 9,000 ft, as follows: the probability indicated a greater than 75% probability of icing over South Dakota from below 5,000 ft through 9,000 ft. In addition, the icing intensity was depicted as light to moderate intensity, with a high threat of Supercooled Large Droplets at 5,000 ft and 7,000 ft over the region. The preflight weather briefing did not include any inflight weather advisories, which would have alerted the pilot of moderate icing conditions expected over the flight route in the form of airmen's meteorological information (AIRMET) Zulu that was issued at 0700 and valid or 0900. AIRMET Zulu included moderate ice between 5,000 ft and flight level 180 with conditions continuing beyond 0900. The preflight weather briefing did include a pilot report which indicated light rime icing conditions encountered by a commercial airplane climbing through IMC conditions between 3,500 ft and 10,000 ft. There was no current significant meteorological information (SIGMET) to prohibit the flight from operating at the time of the accident. According to the Federal Aviation Administration's Instrument Flying Handbook FAA-H8083-15B; Chapter 10 on page 10-24: "The very nature of flight in IMC means operating in visible moisture such as clouds. At the right temperatures, this moisture can freeze on the aircraft, causing increased weight, degraded performance, and unpredictable aerodynamic characteristics. Understanding avoidance and early recognition followed by prompt action are the keys to avoiding this potentially hazardous situation … Structural icing is a condition that can only get worse."

Crash of a McDonnell Douglas MD-83 in Alexandria

Date & Time: Apr 20, 2018 at 1418 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N807WA
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chicago - Alexandria
MSN:
53093/2066
YOM:
1993
Flight number:
WAL708
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
97
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Upon landing at Alexandria Airport, the right main gear collapsed. The airplane slid on the runway for dozen yards before coming to rest. All 101 occupants were evacuated safely while the aircraft is apparently damaged beyond repair. The flight was a charter mission on behalf of the U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement.

Crash of a Beechcraft B100 King Air in Abbotsford

Date & Time: Feb 23, 2018 at 1204 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GIAE
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Abbotsford - San Bernardino
MSN:
BE-8
YOM:
1976
Flight number:
IAX640
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Weather conditions at Abbotsford at the time of departure consisted of a temperature of -2°C in moderate to heavy snowfall with winds of approximately 10 knots. Prior to the departure, the fuel tanks were filled to capacity and the pilot and passengers boarded the aircraft inside the operator's heated hangar. The aircraft was towed outside of the hangar without being treated with anti-ice fluid, and taxied for the departure on runway 07. Due to an inbound arrival at Abbotsford, C-GIAE was delayed for departure. Once cleared for takeoff, the aircraft had been exposed to snow and freezing conditions for approximately 13 minutes. After becoming airborne, the aircraft experienced power and control issues shortly after the landing gear was retracted. The aircraft collided with terrain within the airport perimeter. Four passengers and the pilot sustained serious injuries as a result of the accident which destroyed the aircraft.

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II in Owesco: 3 killed

Date & Time: Feb 22, 2018 at 1939 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N771XW
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Eagle Creek Airpark - Green Bay
MSN:
441-0065
YOM:
1978
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On February 22, 2018, at 1939 eastern standard time, A Cessna 441 Conquest II airplane, N771XW, impacted terrain following a loss of control in Rossville, Indiana. The airline transport rated pilot and two passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Ponderosa Aviation LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operating on an instrument flight plan. The flight originated from the Eagle Creek Airpark (EYE), Indianapolis, Indiana, about 1920, with an intended destination of the Green Bay Austin Straubel International Airport (GRB), Green Bay, Wisconsin. Shortly after takeoff the pilot deviated from the assigned heading and altitude. When questioned by the Indianapolis departure controller, the pilot replied that the airplane was out of control. The pilot then turned the airplane to a heading 90° and explained to the controller that he had a trim problem and difficulty controlling the airplane, but that he had the airplane back to straight and level. The pilot was issued a turn to a heading of 310°, followed by a clearance to climb and maintain 13,000 ft. The pilot was then instructed to contact the Chicago Air Route Traffic Control Center (ZAU). The pilot checked in with ZAU57 sector stating that he was climbing from 10,600 ft to 13,000 ft. The pilot was cleared to climb to FL200 (20,000 ft) followed by a climb to FL230. The pilot was instructed to change frequencies to ZAU46 sector. The pilot then transmitted that he needed a minute to get control of the airplane and that he was having difficulty with the trim. Communication and radar contact was then lost. Several witnesses reported hearing the airplane flying overhead. They all described the airplane as being very loud and that the engine sound was steady up until they heard the impact. The airplane impacted the terrain in a plowed field (upper field) which was soft and muddy. A shallow disruption of the dirt was present which was about 250 ft in length. The impact mark was visible up to the crest of a slight incline where the main pieces of wreckage began. Trees bordered the east end of the field and just beyond the treeline was a tree-covered hill which descended about 50 ft at a slope of about 50°. The trees on the hillside were about 80 to 100 ft tall. At the bottom of the hill was an 8 - 10 ft wide creek. The east bank of the creek was treelined and beyond the trees were to more open fields (lower fields) which were divided by a row of small trees and brush. The wreckage was scattered in the upper field, down the hillside, and into the lower fields. The entire wreckage path was about ¼ mile in length. Recorded weather conditions present 17 miles west of the accident site were overcast at 1,500 ft with 10 miles visibility. The witnesses reported similar conditions in at the accident site.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Akobo: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jan 7, 2018
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
5Y-FDC
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Akobo – Juba
MSN:
208B-1280
YOM:
2007
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
In unclear circumstances, the single engine aircraft crashed while taking off from Akobo Airstrip. It struck a house and several cows before coming to rest in flames. One person on the ground was killed while all 11 occupants escaped uninjured. The aircraft was totally destroyed by a post crash fire.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver off Cottage Point: 6 killed

Date & Time: Dec 31, 2017 at 1515 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-NOO
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
1535
YOM:
1963
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
The single engine seaplane was returning to the Rose Bay seaplane base at Sydney when it crashed in unknown circumstances into the Jerusalem Bay, about 30 km north of its destination. The airplane struck the water surface and sank rapidly off Cottage Point. All six occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Punta Islita: 12 killed

Date & Time: Dec 31, 2017 at 1216 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
TI-BEI
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Punta Islita – San José
MSN:
208B-0900
YOM:
2001
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
12
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Punta Islita Airport, the single engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in flames in a wooded area located few km from the airfield. The aircraft was totally destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all 12 occupants were killed, among them 10 US citizens. On January 12, 2018, the Air Operator Certificate (AOC) was suspended by the Costa Rica’s aviation authority (Dirección General de Aviación Civil). It was reported that the Head of Training died in the accident and that several other key people were not available anymore.

Crash of a Cessna 207 Skywagon near Playa del Carmen

Date & Time: Dec 21, 2017 at 0930 LT
Operator:
Registration:
XA-UHL
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Playa del Carmen – Chichén Itzá
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Few minutes after takeoff from Playa del Carmen, the single engine aircraft crashed into a jungle located in Calica, few km from the airfield. The pilot and all four passengers, a British family on holidays, were uninjured. The tail separated from the fuselage and the aircraft is written off.