Crash of a Saab 340 in Marsh Harbour

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2013 at 1345 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C6-SBJ
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Lauderdale-Marsh Harbour
MSN:
316
YOM:
1992
Flight number:
SBM9561
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
18
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Approach seems to be performed in stormy weather. Aircraft landed hard and bounced three times according to passengers. On third touch down, right wing and right landing were sheared off. Aircraft veered off runway to the left and came to rest in a grassy area. All 21 occupants were uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Beechcraft E18S in Miami: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 2, 2011 at 0809 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N18R
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Miami - Marsh Harbour
MSN:
BA-0312
YOM:
1957
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
6400
Aircraft flight hours:
13221
Circumstances:
After taking off from runway 9L at his home airport and making an easterly departure, the pilot, who was also the president, director of operations, and chief pilot for the on-demand passenger and cargo operation, advised the air traffic controller that he was turning downwind. According to witnesses, the airplane did not sound like it was developing full power. The airplane climbed to about 100 feet, banked to the left, began losing altitude, and impacted a tree, a fence, and two vehicles before coming to rest in a residential area. A postcrash fire ensued, which consumed the majority of the cabin area and left wing. Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane had struck the tree with its left inboard wing about 20 feet above ground level. Multiple tree branches exhibiting propeller cuts were found near the base of the tree. Propeller strike marks on the ground also corresponded to the location of the No. 1 (left side) propeller. There were minimal propeller marks from the No. 2 (right side) propeller. Examination of the propellers revealed that the No. 1 propeller blades exhibited chordwise scratching and S-bending, consistent with operation at impact, but the No. 2 propeller blades did not exhibit any chordwise scratching or bending, which indicates that the No. 2 engine was not producing power at the time of impact. There was no evidence that the pilot attempted to perform the manufacturer’s published single engine procedure, which would have allowed him to maintain altitude. Contrary to the procedure, the left and right throttle control levers were in the full-throttle position, the mixture control levers were in the full-rich position, neither propeller was feathered, and the landing gear was down. Postaccident examination of the No. 1 engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact malfunction or failure. However, the No. 2 engine's condition would have resulted in erratic and unreliable operation; the engine would not have been able to produce full rated horsepower as the compression on four of the nine cylinders was below specification and both magnetos were not functioning correctly. Moisture and corrosion were discovered inside the magneto cases; the left magneto sparked internally in a random pattern when tested and its point gap was in excess of the required tolerance. The right magneto's camshaft follower also exhibited excessive wear and its points would not open, rendering it incapable of providing electrical energy to its spark plugs. Additionally, the main fuel pump could not be rotated by hand; it exhibited play in the gear bearings, and corrosion was present internally. When the airplane was not flying, it was kept outdoors. Large amounts of rain had fallen during the week before the accident, which could have led to the moisture and corrosion in the magnetos. Although the pilot had been having problems with the No. 2 engine for months, he continued to fly the airplane, despite his responsibility, particularly as president, director of operations, and chief pilot of the company, to ensure that the airplane was airworthy. During this period, the pilot would take off with the engine shuddering and would circle the departure airport to gain altitude before heading to the destination. On the night before the accident, the director of maintenance (DOM) replaced the No. 1 cylinder on the No. 2 engine, which had developed a crack in the fin area and had oil seeping out of it. After the DOM performed the replacement, he did not do a compression check or check the magnetos; such checks would have likely revealed that four of the remaining cylinders were not producing specified compression, that the magnetos were not functioning correctly, and that further maintenance was necessary. Review of the airplane's maintenance records did not reveal an entry for installation of the cylinder. The last entry in the maintenance records for the airplane was an annual and a 100-hour inspection, which had occurred about 11 months before the accident.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s improper response to a loss of power in the No. 2 engine and his failure to ensure that the airplane was airworthy. Contributing to the accident was the inadequate engine maintenance by the operator's maintenance personnel.
Final Report:

Ground accident of a Saab 340 in Nassau

Date & Time: Jan 7, 2010 at 1145 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C6-SBE
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nassau - Marsh Harbour
MSN:
099
YOM:
1987
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Two crew took place in the cockpit to prepare the aircraft for a scheduled commercial service to Marsh Harbour. In unknown circumstances, all three landing gear failed simultaneously and aircraft fall on the ground. Both occupants were uninjured while the aircraft was withdrawn from use. It is not known if the retraction of all undercarriage is due to a mechanical failure or a mistake on part of the crew.
Probable cause:
Gear retraction on ground.

Crash of a Douglas DC-3 in Fort Lauderdale

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2005 at 1550 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N3906J
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Fort Lauderdale-Marsh Harbour
MSN:
43344
YOM:
1943
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
18000
Aircraft flight hours:
19623
Circumstances:
The left enfine caught fire one minute after takeoff from Fort Lauderdale airport. The crew made an emergency landing on 56th Street, in Coral Ridge Isles neighborhood. The aircraft, which was carrying 3'200 pounds of granite to the Bahamas, was totally destroyed. All three occupants were slightly injured.

Crash of a Cessna 402 in Marsh Harbour: 9 killed

Date & Time: Aug 25, 2001 at 1845 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N8097W
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Marsh Harbour-Miami
MSN:
402-1014
YOM:
1976
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9

Crash of a Cessna 402 in Marsh Harbour: 5 killed

Date & Time: Sep 13, 1995 at 2030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N69303
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Bimini-Mores Cay
MSN:
402-0423
YOM:
1973
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5

Crash of a Cessna 401 in Marsh Harbour

Date & Time: Dec 26, 1990 at 1300 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N799NW
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Sebastian-Marsh Harbour
MSN:
401-0213
YOM:
1971
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0

Crash of a Cessna 421 Golden Eagle in Marsh Harbour

Date & Time: Aug 9, 1988 at 1355 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N98427
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San Andros-Marsh Harbour-West Palm Beach
MSN:
421-0032
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0

Crash of a Cessna 402C off Palm Beach: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 27, 1987
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N2652B
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Palm Beach - Marsh Harbour
MSN:
402C-0345
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
16740
Captain / Total hours on type:
165.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9151
Circumstances:
On 5/27/87 at about 0915 edt, the pilot departed Palm Beach-Intl Airport (PBI) on a flight to Marsh Harbour, Great Abaco Island, Bahamas. When the aircraft did not arrive at the destination, a search was initiated. The aircraft was not found and was presumed to have been destroyed. The pilot was presumed to have been fatally injured. Radar data revealed that the aircraft had departed toward Marsh Harbour, but the last contact with the flight was approximately 12 miles east of PBI. An aircraft was seen flying eastbound over the destination airport at about the time of the estimated arrival time. Also, another pilot thought she heard a radio transmission from the missing aircraft when the pilot reported in the vicinity of Grand Bahama Island.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: missing aircraft
Phase of operation: unknown
Findings
1. (c) reason for occurrence undetermined
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-20 Marquise in Marsh Harbour: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 21, 1979
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N304L
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
137
YOM:
1968
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Crashed in unknown circumstances shortly after takeoff from Marsh Harbour. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.