Zone

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter 300 in Libya

Date & Time: Dec 31, 1982
Registration:
5A-DCW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
639
YOM:
1979
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Suffered an accident somewhere in Libya in 1982. Exact date unknown. The aircraft was operated by the Libyan Ministry for Agriculture.

Crash of a Pilatus PC-6/B1-H2 Turbo Porter in Libya: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 24, 1970
Operator:
Registration:
HB-FCW
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
638
YOM:
1967
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
While taking off from an airstrip located somewhere in the Libyan Desert, the single engine aircraft crashed and burst into flames. The airplane was destroyed and the pilot, sole on board, was killed. Owned by Pilatus, the airplane was operated for Air Libya.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.104 Dove 2B in Libya

Date & Time: Feb 26, 1964
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
G-ANGE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
04167
YOM:
1953
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Upon landing at the Oil Station n° 12, somewhere in Libya, one of the main landing gear collapsed. The airplane slid for several yards before coming to rest. There were no injuries but the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Scottish Twin Pioneer 1 in Fezzan: 6 killed

Date & Time: Dec 7, 1957
Operator:
Registration:
G-AOEO
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Wadi al Ashtan – Tripoli
MSN:
503
YOM:
1956
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Aircraft flight hours:
564
Circumstances:
On 7 December the aircraft flew down to Fezzan from Idris Airport to the Esso (Petroleum Ltd.) camp at Wadi al Atshan - a flight of some 400 miles. From Atshan it made one local flight of 45 minutes duration. The aircraft was then refuelled at Atshan and set off at 1427LT for the return journey to Idris Airport where it was expected to arrive at 1800LT with 2 crew and 4 passengers aboard. When the aircraft failed to arrive, a series of radio checks were carried out followed by a widespread air and surface search. The wreckage was sighted the next day. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and all six occupants have been killed.
Probable cause:
The accident Was the result of the failure in fatigue of the forward tube of the "V brace" structure in the outer panel of the port wing. This failure led to the breaking away of the outer panel of the port wing from the aircraft in flight. The aircraft was then rendered completely uncontrollable and dived vertically to the ground.
Final Report:

Crash of a Consolidated B-24D-25-CO Liberator in Libya: 9 killed

Date & Time: Apr 4, 1943 at 1400 LT
Operator:
Registration:
41-24301
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Soluch - Soluch
MSN:
1096
YOM:
1943
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
9
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
Following a bombing mission over Naples, Italy, the aircraft failed to return to its base in Soluch, Libya. During the back trip, the crew radioed he lost his automatic direction finder and requested ground vector. Due to poor visibility, the crew overflew Soluch Airport and continued to the south. Two hours later, due to fuel exhaustion, the crew decided to abandon the aircraft and bailed out. The four-engine aircraft continued for 26 km to the south before crashing in the Calanshio Sand Sea, about 710 km southeast of Soluch. USAF authorities thought that the aircraft crashed into the Mediterranean sea and the SAR operations were unable to find any trace of the aircraft or the crew. On November 9, 1958, a British oil exploration team located the crash site for the first time. Five bodies were found in May 1960 dozen km away from the wreckage.
Probable cause:
According to the Graves Registration Service, the aircraft flew on a 150 degree course toward Benina Airfield (Soluch Airport). The craft radioed for a directional reading from the HF/DF station at Benina and received a reading of 330 degrees from Benina. The actions of the pilot in flying 440 miles into the desert, however, indicate the navigator probably took a reciprocal reading off the back of the radio directional loop antenna from a position beyond and south of Benina but on course. The pilot flew into the desert, thinking he was still over the Mediterranean and on his way to Benina.

Crash of a Boeing B-17C Flying Fortress in Libya

Date & Time: Nov 8, 1941 at 1200 LT
Operator:
Registration:
AN529
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Shallufa - Shallufa
MSN:
2065
YOM:
1940
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew left RAF Shallufa that day to bomb all ships parked in the Benghazi harbor. Following a successful mission, the crew was returning to his base when the aircraft run out of fuel. As the engines number one, two and three failed, the captain decided to reduce his altitude and attempted an emergency landing in a desert area located 128 km west of Fort Maddalena. While the aircraft was damaged beyond repair, all eight crew members were unhurt and later rescued by a ground unit.
Crew (220th Squadron):
Jimmy Stevenson, pilot,
Ken Brailsford, pilot,
Dick Parnell,
Tony Barwood,
Tom Gwynn,
Ken Waddle,
Bill Struthers,
Colin Barber.
Probable cause:
Fuel exhaustion.

Crash of a Short S.25 Sunderland I into the Mediterranean Sea: 8 killed

Date & Time: Jul 31, 1941 at 2323 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
L2166
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
12
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
8
Circumstances:
The aircraft and its crew was dropping depth charges when it was shot down by enemy fire from the Italian submarine christened 'Delfino'. It went out of control and crashed into the sea some 22 km off the Libyan coast. Four crew members were rescued.
Crew (230th Squadron):
F/Lt Engert Brand, pilot,
P/O Ernest Edward Dennis, pilot,
F/O Raymond Edward Packington, pilot, †
F/O Robert Miles East, observer, †
F/Sgt Robert Horsburgh, wireless operator and air gunner, †
Sgt George Cyril Starkey, wireless operator and air gunner, †
Sgt Jack Ivor Mell, wireless operator and air gunner, †
Sgt William Murray White, wireless operator and air gunner,
Sgt Stephen Edward Gould, air gunner, †
Sgt Edward Shoosmith, air gunner, †
Sgt W. H. Yates, air gunner,
LAC Geoffrey Elliot Cooper, radio operator. †
Probable cause:
Shot down by enemy fire.

Crash of a Bristol 130 Bombay I in Libya: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jun 21, 1940
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
L5850
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances in the Libyan desert while on its way to el-Gubba, east of Tobruk. W/O N. P. Donnelly survived and became a PoW while four other occupants were killed.
Crew (216th Squadron):
F/S Benjamin T. M. Baker, pilot,
F/L John B. W. Smith, pilot
LAC Alfred F. Crohill,
Cpl William C. Royle, wireless operator and air gunner,
W/O N. P. Donnelly.

Special thanks to Nigel Hartley for his testimony.

Crash of a Lockheed 14-WF62 Super Electra off Libya: 5 killed

Date & Time: Dec 21, 1939 at 1300 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AFYU
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Alexandria – El Salloum – Valetta – Croydon
MSN:
1444
YOM:
1939
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
Less than one hour after his departure from El Salloum Airport, at the border between Egypt and Libya, the pilot sent a mayday message due to unknown technical problems. He was forced to ditch the aircraft off the Libyan coast. The crew of a ship was quickly on the scene and was able to rescue six occupants, among them the pilot, while five other occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Unknown technical problem.

Crash of Caudron C.630 Simoun in the Libyan desert

Date & Time: Dec 29, 1935
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-ANRY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Paris – Tunis – Benghazi – Cairo – Saigon
MSN:
7042
YOM:
1935
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The Caudron C.630 Simoun with s/n 7042 was ordered in July 1935, built and delivered to its owner Antoine de Saint-Exupéry in September 1935. After several trips in Africa, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry decided at the end of December to fly from Paris to Saigon to establish a new record. After 19 hours and 38 minutes of flight, while cruising by night over the Libyan desert, the crew encountered poor weather conditions with heavy rain falls. The crew decided first to climb to 2,500 meters but cumulus were still there so he reduced his altitude to 1,000 meters then 400 meters and lower until the aircraft struck a sandy ground and crashed. Both occupants were uninjured but walked away for four days without water or any food before being rescued. The aircraft was written off.