Crash of a Socata TBM-900 in Fairoaks

Date & Time: Oct 15, 2016 at 0835 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
M-VNTR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Douglas - Fairoaks
MSN:
1097
YOM:
2016
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a positioning flight to Fairoaks from Douglas (Isle of Man) to pick up a passenger. After landing, the single engine aircraft failed to stop properly, overran, went through a soft ground, lost its undercarriage and came to rest 100 yards past the runway end. Both crew members were slightly injured while the aircraft was seriously damaged. Brand new, it was delivered last September.

Crash of a Beechcraft Super King Air 200 in Newnan: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 4, 2003 at 1940 LT
Registration:
N85BK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Douglas-Newnan
MSN:
BB-0734
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1248
Aircraft flight hours:
9864
Circumstances:
During a night approach in low ceiling (150 to 200 feet), the twin engine aircraft hit trees and crashed in a wooded area located one mile short of runway 32. The aircraft was destroyed and both pilot killed.

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Liverpool: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jun 14, 2000 at 0954 LT
Operator:
Registration:
G-BMBC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Douglas-Liverpool
MSN:
31-7952172
YOM:
1979
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
18000

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 560A in Glenrock: 6 killed

Date & Time: Feb 19, 1978 at 2020 LT
Registration:
N2639B
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Casper - Douglas
MSN:
560-307
YOM:
1956
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
3485
Captain / Total hours on type:
23.00
Circumstances:
While flying in marginal weather conditions (low ceiling, snow and icing conditions), both engines lost power. The pilot elected to divert to the nearest airport but the airplane lost height and eventually collided with terrain. The wreckage was found a day later. A passenger was seriously injured while six other occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Controlled collision with ground due to inadequate preflight preparation and planning on part of the pilot-in-command. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Initiated flight in adverse weather conditions,
- Attempted operation with known deficiencies in equipment,
- Ice induction,
- Low ceiling,
- Snow,
- Icing conditions, sleet, freezing rain,
- Conditions conducive to carburetor/induction system icing,
- Partial loss of power on both engines,
- Later recovered,
- No record of weather briefing received,
- Forced landing off airport on land,
- Zero visibility,
- Blowing snow,
- Recovered a day later.
Final Report:

Crash of a Vickers 701 Viscount in Liverpool: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jul 20, 1965 at 1710 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AMOL
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Douglas - Liverpool
MSN:
25
YOM:
1953
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Aircraft flight hours:
20694
Circumstances:
Viscount G-AMOL departed Ronaldsway at 16:49 for a flight to Liverpool. The flight was made at flight level 70 and at 17:08 hours the aircraft was identified by Liverpool radar over Wallasey and positioned for a PPI continuous descent radar approach to runway 26. Half a mile from touchdown the radar approach was completed and the aircraft was then seen (on radar) to be just discernibly to the right of the centreline. No radio messages were received from the aircraft after the start of the talk-down. At 550 metres from the threshold, it was estimated to be at a height between 30 and 60 metres and about 40 metres to the right of the centre line. At this point witnesses saw the aircraft bank and turn to the right. The fuselage was level and the aircraft was banked almost vertically for part of the turn. When heading in approximately the opposite direction to the runway it rolled on to its back and crashed into the roof of a factory about 365 metres to the right of the extended centre line of the runway and about 550 metres from the threshold. After penetrating the roof, the aircraft had struck a heavy steel girder which had caused it to tip "tail-over-nose". It had then come to rest the right way up on the floor of the workshop with the tail resting on the steel roof trusses. An intense fire broke out which consumed almost the whole structure of the fuselage. Both crew members and two employees of the factory were killed.
Probable cause:
The aircraft went out of control during the final stage of an approach to land but the reason for this has not been determined.

Crash of a Bristol 170 Freighter 21 in Douglas

Date & Time: Jun 30, 1962
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AGVC
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
12732
YOM:
1946
Region:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On touchdown at Douglas-Ronaldsway Airport, Isle of Man, one of the main landing gear collapsed. The airplane sank on runway and came to rest. There were no injuries but the aircraft was written off.
Probable cause:
Undercarriage collapsed on landing.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.104 Devon C.1 near Largs

Date & Time: Jun 3, 1958
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VP969
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Douglas - Abbotsinch
MSN:
04222
YOM:
1948
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
En route from the Isle of Man to RAF Abbotsinch, the twin engine aircraft encountered heavy turbulences, went out of control and crashed on the slope of a mountain. The pilot F/Lt Barney Barclay was injured and the aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of a Bristol 170 Freighter 21 at Winter Hill: 35 killed

Date & Time: Feb 27, 1958 at 0945 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-AICS
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Douglas – Manchester
MSN:
12762
YOM:
1946
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
39
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
35
Circumstances:
The aircraft, operated by Manx Airlines Ltd, took off at 0915LT from Ronaldsway Airport, Isle of Man, on a flight to Ringway Airport, Manchester. It carried 39 passengers and a crew of 3. At approximately 0945LT the aircraft crashed near the summit of Winter Hill, killing 35 of the 42 persons aboard. All five crew members survived but were seriously injured. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact.
Probable cause:
The accident was attributed to the error of the first officer in tuning the radio compass on Oldham Beacon Instead of on Wigan Beacon. A contributory cause was the failure of the captain to check that the radio compass was tuned on the correct beacon.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas C-47B-35-DK in Düsseldorf: 3 killed

Date & Time: Dec 22, 1955
Operator:
Registration:
G-AMZC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Douglas - Düsseldorf
MSN:
16522/33270
YOM:
1945
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a positioning flight from Douglas, Isle of Man, to Düsseldorf to pick up passengers. While descending to Lohausen Airport, the crew received the permission to perform an ILS approach but for unknown reason, the captain preferred to make a visual approach despite the low visibility caused by marginal weather conditions. On final, the airplane was too low, hit trees and crashed 5 km short of runway. All three crew members were killed.
Probable cause:
Wrong approach configuration on part of the flying pilot who continued the descent without sufficient visual reference, causing the aircraft to pass below the glide in low visibility conditions.

Crash of a De Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide off Liverpool: 8 killed

Date & Time: Nov 12, 1948 at 1815 LT
Operator:
Registration:
G-AKOF
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dublin – Douglas
MSN:
6538
YOM:
1947
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
8
Captain / Total flying hours:
15000
Circumstances:
On approach to Douglas-Ronaldsway Airport, the crew encountered poor weather conditions and was unable to land. In thick fog, the pilot made several attempts to land, without success. As the weather conditions were better in Liverpool, he decided to divert. While descending to Speke Airport, both engines stopped simultaneously. The pilot elected to make an emergency landing but the aircraft crashed into the Mersey, about 3 miles north of the airport. A passenger was rescued while eight other occupants were killed. The aircraft sank and was lost.
Crew:
John Higgins, pilot,
Noel Clucas, radio operator.
Probable cause:
It was determined that both engines failed on approach to Liverpool-Speke Airport because the fuel tanks were empty. The crew positioned that day from Douglas to Dublin to pick up passengers but failed to refuel prior to departure from Dublin. After several unsuccessful attempts to land in Douglas-Ronaldsway Airport, a divert to Liverpool and one approach, the fuel tanks were empty and both engines failed as the fuel quantity was insufficient. It was then considered that the crew misjudged the situation. The pilot was very experienced with over 15,000 flying hours and more than 5,000 flights between Liverpool and the Isle of Man.