Crash of a Lockheed L-414-08-10 Hudson IV on Horn Island

Date & Time: Dec 22, 1973
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-AGX
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
6051
YOM:
1942
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll, al loss of hydraulic pressure forced the crew to abort. Unable to stop within the remaining distance, the twin engine airplane overran and came to rest against an embankment. Both pilots were injured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Photos via www.aussieairliners.org

Crash of a Lockheed L-414-08 Hudson IVA in Tennant Creek: 6 killed

Date & Time: Sep 24, 1966 at 0915 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-AGE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tennant Creek - Tennant Creek
MSN:
414-6039
YOM:
1941
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
The aircraft had been carrying out magnetometer survey flights from the airport for several weeks. It departed at 06:30 hours local time, reaching the survey area an hour later. At 07:50 the Doppler equipment became unserviceable and a little later light rain was encountered. The survey work was abandoned and the flight returned to Tennant Creek. At 09:14 the crew radioed that they were in the circuit area. Wind was reported to be from 070° at 14 knots. The acknowledgement of this information was the last contact with the flight. A minute later, the twin engine aircraft crashed in a prairie located 2 miles west of the runway 07 threshold.The aircraft was totally destroyed and all six on board were killed, among them a child aged 11. An examination of wreckage showed that one of the duplicated aileron control chains in the pilot's control column was broken in the region of the control wheel sprocket. A link pin had failed and this pin might have subsequently jammed the assembly as the control wheel was being rotated. Control could not be taken over by the copilot, as there was no copilot on the flight. The right hand cockpit seat and rudder pedals were removed so a crew member was able to gain access to the nose area of the aircraft for the survey work.
Probable cause:
The cause of this accident was a loss of control of the aircraft, and although the evidence available does not permit the reason for the loss of control to be determined, the possibility can not be eliminated that the pilot suffered an impairment of ability and, coincidentally, was deprived temporarily of aileron control.

Crash of a Lockheed L-414 Hudson in Belo Horizonte: 4 killed

Date & Time: Mar 18, 1963 at 1140 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PT-BAY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Belo Horizonte - Caratinga
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane departed Belo Horizonte-Pampulha Airport on a photogrammetry flight to Caratinga, Minas Gerais. Just after liftoff, while in initial climb, the airplane lost height, crashed on a bulldozer parked near the runway end and burst into flames. All four occupants were killed.
Crew:
Jacy Machado, pilot,
Stenio Benedito dos Santos, navigator.
Passengers.
Rogério Sixel de Paula, engineer,
Ronald Sutter Silveira, engineer.

Crash of a Lockheed L-414-56 Hudson IIIA off Lae: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jun 8, 1958
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-AGG
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Lae - Wewak - Lae
MSN:
414-6486
YOM:
1942
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
Carrying one pilot, a navigator and a photographer, the aircraft departed Lae on a photographic survey flight over the Wewak area, but conditions proved unfavourable for photography and it was decided to return to Lae. Lae tower was called five minutes before arrival and landing instructions were passed, in which it was advised that Runway 32 was to be used, the wind velocity being 300 degrees at 15 knots with gusts to 20 knots. Just before turning on to base leg the aircraft was cleared to do a practice asymmetric landing, but was warned to expect turbulence on the final approach. This was acknowledged by the aircraft. Witnesses agree that the aircraft was very low at the time of entering the final approach from a right-hand base leg with the left-hand propeller feathered. They also agreed that, following what sounded to be a marked increase in the power setting when 300 yards from the end of the strip, the aircraft rolled to the left and dived into the water in a partly inverted attitude. All three occupants perished.
Crew:
Allen Motteram, pilot,
Patrick Murphy, navigator,
Passenger:
Gordon Murrell, photographer.

Crash of a Lockheed L-414-56-11 Hudson III near Waskaganish: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jul 3, 1957 at 1200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
CF-CRL
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Great Whale River – Val-d’Or
MSN:
414-7546
YOM:
1943
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
3000
Captain / Total hours on type:
150.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft, owned by the Photographic Survey Corporation Limited, departed Great Whale River at approximately 0915 hours eastern standard time on a non-scheduled flight to Val d'Or, with the pilot, a maintenance engineer and two passengers aboard. An instrument flight plan was filed prior to departure, and the aircraft was to fly at 7 000 ft direct to Val d'Or, the estimated time of arrival being 1200 hours. Following take-off CF-CRL climbed on a magnetic heading of 185° on instruments, and the pilot was requested to report passing through 7 000 ft and to continue the climb to 9 000 ft. After passing routine messages, in which the freezing level of 10 000 ft was included, the pilot reported at 0928 hours that he was visual at 10 000 ft and that he would maintain this altitude to Val d'Or. At 0930 he stated he would maintain 1 000 ft on top of the overcast, i.e. 11 000 ft. At 0957 the pilot requested a radio check, and Great Whale River informed him that his transmission was weak. The pilot acknowledged this message which was the last transmission received from him. At 1600 hours the RCAF Search and Rescue Co-ordination Centre at Trenton, Ontario was notified that the aircraft was overdue, and a search was begun. The wreckage was found on 25 July, 36 miles from Rupert House, P. Q., on a bearing of 153° True. All four occupants had been killed in the crash, and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
The cause of the accident was not conclusively determined. It should be noted, however, that the pilot took off in weather conditions below permissible limits, in an area sparsely served with aids to navigation, in an aircraft not equipped with de- icing equipment.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed L-414-56 Hudson in Horn Island: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jul 1, 1957 at 1535 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-AGO
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Horn - Weipa Mission
MSN:
414-6429
YOM:
1942
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Aircraft flight hours:
3083
Circumstances:
At 0735 hours, the aircraft departed Horn Island with only the normal crew on board to conduct aerial photography over the northern portion of the Cape York Peninsula. The aircraft returned to Horn Island at about midday and was refueled to full tanks. The crew lunched with the crew of World Wide Aerial Surveys Hudson VH-SMM which was also conducting aerial photography in the area. After lunch the three passengers boarded VH-AGO which set course for Weipa Mission at 1516 hours. At 1523 hours, Captain Linfoot advised the communication station on Thursday Island that he was returning to Horn Island with engine trouble and requesting that VH-SMM be held on the ground at Horn Island to render assistance if required. Following a baulked approach at Horn Island, the aircraft crashed on a tidal mud shelf 1.25 miles north-west of Horn Island Aerodrome at approximately 1535 hours. It was subsequently established that the port engine had seized as a result of a master rod bearing failure. The inquiry determined that VH-AGO had a total time of 3083 hours with 260 hours since last overhaul.
The following account of the accident is extracted from "Aviation Safety Digest":
"The aircraft was temporarily based at the Weipa Mission aerodrome, northern Queensland, with the normal crew consisting of a pilot, a navigator and a photographic assistant. On the day before the accident the aircraft was flown on a private flight from Weipa Mission to the Horn Island aerodrome with three non-paying passengers aboard in addition to the crew. The aircraft remained overnight at Horn Island, and early on the following morning took off with the normal crew, and carried out survey work over a period of some four hours. The aircraft returned to Horn lsland at about midday and was refueled. During the same morning another Hudson aircraft (VH-SMM of WWAS. Ed.) engaged on photographic survey work had arrived at the aerodrome and the two crews lunched together. Both aircraft were prepared for departure and the three passengers again boarded the Weipa Mission aircraft, which took-off first and set course at 1518 hours E.S.T. intending to climb to 7,000 feet en route for Weipa, 45 minutes flying time to the south. Five minutes after departure the pilot of this aircraft advised the communication station at Thursday Island that trouble had developed in the port engine and that he was returning, to land at Horn Island. He also asked that the other Hudson aircraft be held on the ground in case some assistance was needed. At the stage that this message was relayed to the captain of the second Hudson the aircraft was lined up for take-oft but immediately vacated the strip. The captain watched the circuit and approach of the other aircraft from a position clear of, but adjacent to, the threshold of Runway 08. The returning aircraft was seen to cross Runway 08 and then turn downwind at a height of 1,500-1,700 feet and proceed with a left-hand circuit towards the threshold of that runway. As the aircraft turned on to final approach at about the normal distance from the threshold but still unusually high, the ground observers noticed that the undercarriage had not been extended. The aircraft continued to descend in this configuration and it seemed likely at this stage that a wheels-up landing would be made well down the strip. When the aircraft had reached a point approximately 600 feet from the threshold and 150 feet above ground level the undercarriage was observed to extend and it was also noticed that the port propeller was feathered. At this point there appeared to be no wing flap extended and the aircraft crossed the strip threshold at a height of more than 100 feet and at a speed estimated to be well in excess of the normal approach speed. Soon after the aircraft had passed the threshold it was seen to roll and turn to port and this motion continued until the aircraft disappeared from view at such a height and angle of bank that an accident seemed imminent. The pilot of the Hudson on the ground immediately took-off and located the wrecked aircraft on a coral mud shelf just beyond the northern shore of the island. Ground parties discovered that the aircraft had been virtually destroyed by very high impact forces and the six occupants had lost their lives."
Those on board at the time of the crash were:
Joseph (Joe) Linfoot (Captain)
Hermione Ivy (Josie) Linfoot (Wife of the Captain)
Graham Holstock (Navigator)
Harold Corrigan (Camera Operator)
William Frank Mitchell (Director of Mitchell Aerial Services Pty Ltd, Cairns)
Lionel Kenneth George Jeffery (a pilot intending to join Adastra).
Source & photos:
http://www.adastron.com/adastra/aircraft/hudson/vh-ago.htm
Probable cause:
The official report found that a baulked approach was initiated at or near the threshold of Runway 08. It was concluded that given the speed and height of the approach, a baulked approach was essential to avoid over-running the airstrip. The reference to a council truck may be related to the fact that the DCA groundsman was directed to drive his vehicle on to the runway to prevent Hudson VH-SMM from taking-off at the request of the captain of VH-AGO.

Crash of a Lockheed L-414A Hudson near Miracema do Tocantins: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 30, 1956
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PT-AMJ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Goiânia – Belém
MSN:
414-7547
YOM:
1943
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
Crashed in unknown circumstances in the region of Miracema do Tocantins, killing all four occupants.

Crash of a Lockheed C-28 Hudson in Ilhéus: 8 killed

Date & Time: Jan 19, 1955
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
2902
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
414-7178
YOM:
1943
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
8
Circumstances:
While conduction a liaison flight from Fortaleza, the twin engine aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances in Ilhéus, killing all eight occupants.

Crash of a Lockheed L-414-08 Hudson IVA near Chichester Dam: 3 killed

Date & Time: Sep 14, 1954 at 1445 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-SML
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Sydney – Taree – Kempsey – Armidale – Glen Innes – Tamworth
MSN:
414-6049
YOM:
1941
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The aircraft left Sydney-Mascot at 1400LT on a newspaper delivery flight to Tamworth with intermediate stops in Taree, Kempsey, Armidale and Glen Innes. At 1437LT, the crew informed ground about his position and confirmed his ETA in Taree at 1501LT. About eight minutes later, the airplane hit trees and crashed in a dense wooded area located about 10 km north of the Chichester Dam. As the airplane failed to arrive, SAR operations were conducted but eventually suspended two weeks later as no trace of the aircraft nor the crew was found. Fifteen months later, on December 22, 1955, the pilot of a Butler Air Transport DH.114 Heron spotted the wreckage that was found about 20 feet below the summit. All three occupants have been killed.
Crew:
Cpt Douglas Hereward Swain, pilot,
F/O Alistair Sydney Cole-Milne, copilot.
Passenger:
Cpt D. Burns.

Crash of a Lockheed C-28 Hudson in Salvador: 20 killed

Date & Time: Jul 2, 1954 at 1200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
2901
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Salvador – Fortaleza
MSN:
414-7176
YOM:
1943
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
16
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
20
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Salvador Airport, while climbing, an engine failed. The airplane stalled and crashed in a field past the runway end. All 20 occupants were killed, among them five children.
Probable cause:
Engine failure during initial climb.