Crash of a Cessna 500 Citation I in Marietta: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 24, 2017 at 1924 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 500 Citation (29724)">
Registration:
N8DX
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Cincinnati – Atlanta
MSN:
500-0303
YOM:
1976
Location: Marietta (22744)"> Georgia (14562)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The pilot, sole on board, was performing a flight from Cincinnati to Atlanta. He left Cincinnati Municipal Airport at 1812LT bound for Fulton County-Brown Field Airport, west of Atlanta. After an uneventful flight, he started the descent from FL230 at 1859LT to 3,100 feet then climbed again to 3,800 feet for five minutes when control was lost. The airplane hit a house located in the suburb of Marietta and crashed in flames in a garden. The house and the aircraft were destroyed, the pilot was killed. It is believed that he encountered technical problems with the automatic pilot system just before the loss of control.

Crash of a Cessna 500 Citation I in Winfield: 4 killed

Date & Time: Oct 13, 2016 at 2136 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 500 Citation (29724)">
Operator: Norjet (40110)">
Registration:
C-GTNG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Kelowna – Calgary
MSN:
500-0169
YOM:
1974
Location: Kelowna (21429)"> British Columbia (14080)">
Country: Canada (13435)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
3912
Captain / Total hours on type:
525.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8649
Circumstances:
The pilot and 3 passengers boarded the aircraft. At 2126, the pilot obtained an IFR clearance from the CYLW ground controller for the KELOWNA SEVEN DEP standard instrument departure (SID) procedure for Runway 34. The instructions for the runway 34 KELOWNA SEVEN DEP SID were to climb to 9000 feet ASL, or to an altitude assigned by air traffic control (ATC), and to contact the Vancouver Area Control Centre (ACC) after passing through 4000 feet ASL. The aircraft was then to climb and track 330° magnetic (M) inbound to the Kelowna non-directional beacon (LW). From LW, the aircraft was to climb and track 330°M outbound for vectors to the filed or assigned route. At 2127, C-GTNG began to taxi toward Runway 34. At 2131, the CYLW tower controller cleared the aircraft to take off from the intersection of Runway 34 and Taxiway D. The pilot acknowledged the clearance and began the take-off roll on Runway 34 about 1 minute later. Radar data showed that, at 2133:41, the aircraft was 0.5 nautical miles (nm) beyond the departure end of the runway and was climbing at more than 4000 feet per minute (fpm) through 2800 feet ASL, at a climb angle of approximately 16°. In that time, it had deviated laterally by about 3° to the right of the 330°M track associated with the SID. At 2134:01, when the aircraft was 1.2 nm beyond the runway, it had climbed through 3800 feet ASL and deviated further to the right of the intended routing. The aircraft’s rate of climb decreased to about 1600 fpm, and its ground speed was 150 knots. A short time later, the aircraft’s rate of climb decreased to 600 fpm, its climb angle decreased to 2°, and its ground speed had increased to 160 knots. At 2134:22, the aircraft was 2.1 nm beyond the departure end of the runway, and it was climbing through approximately 4800 feet ASL. The aircraft had deviated about 13° to the right of the intended track, and its rate of climb reached its maximum value of approximately 000 fpm, 3 with a climb angle of about 22°. The ground speed was roughly 145 knots. At 2134:39, the aircraft was 2.7 nm beyond the departure end of the runway, passing through 5800 feet ASL, and had deviated about 20° to the right of the intended routing. The rate of climb was approximately 2000 fpm, with a climb angle of about 7°. According to the SID, the pilot was to make initial contact with the ACC after the aircraft had passed through 4000 feet ASL.Initial contact was made when the aircraft was passing through 6000 feet ASL, at 2134:42. At 2134:46, the ACC acknowledged the communication and indicated that the aircraft had been identified on radar. The aircraft was then cleared for a right turn direct to the MENBO waypoint once it was at a safe altitude, or once it was climbing through 8000 feet ASL. The aircraft was also cleared to follow the flight-planned route and climb to 10 000 feet ASL. At 2134:55, the pilot read back the clearance as the aircraft climbed through 6400 feet ASL, with a rate of climb of approximately 2400 fpm. The aircraft was tracking about 348°M at a ground speed of about 170 knots. At 2135:34, the aircraft began a turn to the right, which was consistent with the instruction from the ACC. Flying directly to the MENBO waypoint required the aircraft to be on a heading of 066°M, requiring a right turn of about 50°. At this point, the aircraft was still climbing and was passing through 8300 feet ASL. The rate of climb was about 3000 fpm. The aircraft continued the right turn and was tracking through 085°M. After reaching a peak altitude of approximately 8600 feet ASL, the aircraft entered a steep descending turn to the right, consistent with the characteristics of a spiral dive. At 2135:47, the ACC controller cleared C-GTNG to climb to FL 250. The lack of radar returns and radio communications from the aircraft prompted the controller to initiate search activities. At 2151, NAV CANADA notified first responders, who located the accident site in forested terrain at about midnight. The aircraft had been destroyed, and all of the occupants had been fatally injured.
Causes:
The aircraft departed controlled flight, for reasons that could not be determined, and collided with terrain.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 500 Citation in Derby: 2 killed

Date & Time: Oct 18, 2013 at 1017 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 500 Citation (29724)">
Operator: Ed Dufresne Ministries (39223)">
Registration:
N610ED
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Wichita - New Braunfels
MSN:
500-0241
YOM:
1975
Location: Derby (19229)"> Kansas (14872)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Aircraft was destroyed during impact with terrain near Derby, Kansas. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Dufresne, Inc.; Murrieta, California. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight. The airplane departed Wichita Mid-Continent Airport (ICT), Wichita, Kansas, about 1007 and was destined for New Braunfels Regional Airport (BAZ), New Braunfels, Texas. Preliminary data from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control showed normal operations during climb before the pilot contacted the FAA Kansas City Air Route Traffic Control Center at 1014 and reported leveling at 15,000 feet. The controller cleared the pilot to proceed direct to Millsap, Texas and climb to 23,000 feet. Over the next minute, the aircraft made an abrupt right turn followed by an abrupt left turn. Radar data showed the airplane descended to 14,600 feet before resuming climb and reaching 15,200 feet at 1016:20. The aircraft then made an abrupt descending left turn and radar and radio contact was lost. Several witnesses reported seeing the airplane below the clouds in a nose down vertical dive. One witness reported that after impact he saw a fireball about 500 feet high followed by a column of smoke. Evidence at the accident scene showed evidence of a postimpact fire with most of the wreckage located in or near a single impact crater. The outboard portion of the left wing and the left aileron was located about 3,000 feet west of the main wreckage. At 1038, the closest official surface weather observation site at McConnell Air Force Base (IAB), Wichita, Kansas, reported a northeast wind at 12 knots, light rain, and a broken ceiling at 1,700 feet above ground level. Satellite imagery indicated abundant cloud cover with the cloud cover top near 21,000 feet mean sea level (msl). Pilot reports in the area indicated light to moderate icing conditions above 6,000 feet msl at the accident time.

Crash of a Cessna 500 Citation in Santiago de Compostella: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 2, 2012 at 0617 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 500 Citation (29724)">
Operator: Airnor – Aeronaves del Noroeste (37166)">
Registration:
EC-IBA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Oviedo - Santiago de Compostella
MSN:
500-0178
YOM:
1974
Country: Spain (13257)">
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
3600
Captain / Total hours on type:
500.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
678
Copilot / Total hours on type:
412
Aircraft flight hours:
9460
Circumstances:
At 2146LT on 01AUG2012, crew completed an ambulance flight from Oviedo-Asturias Airport to Porto with a medical team and a crew of two on board, on behalf of the National Transplant Organisation. During the night, crew was awaiting at Porto to bring back the medical team to Oviedo but the medical operation took more time than expected. Due to rest time, crew left Porto at 0545LT for a short flight to its base and received two minutes after take off the authorization to complete an ILS approach to runway 17. Following a last weather briefing, crew started the descent and obtained the permission to land at 0615LT. Two minutes later, while on a correct configuration for landing (gear lowered and flaps down), aircraft hit tree tops and crashed in a wooded area located 1,600 meters short of runway 17. While the aircraft was destroyed, both pilots aged 35 & 37 were killed.
Causes:
According to CIAIAC, the airplane was correctly configured for the approach and the collision occurred in a normal attitude. At the time of the accident, visibility was estimated at 4 km with patches of clouds at 600 feet on approach. As a result, Board concluded the accident has been assimilated to a controlled flight into terrain (CFIT). More investigation should be conducted to complete this event.