Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Foley

Date & Time: Apr 26, 2016 at 1424 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N3372Q
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Foley - Carrollton
MSN:
421B-0256
YOM:
1972
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain in Foley, Alabama. The private pilot sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the flight from Foley Municipal Airport (5R4), Foley, Alabama, to West Georgia Regional Airport (CTJ), Carrollton, Georgia. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. According to the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, during the takeoff from runway 18, the airplane left the ground at the runway end, just clearing the airport's perimeter fence. The airplane was unable to gain sufficient altitude to clear the trees less than ¼ of a mile south of the runway. The airplane began hitting tree tops, and impacted a large oak tree with the left wing, then spun into two other large oak trees 30 feet to the southwest. The airplane then flipped over, hit the ground, exploded and was consumed by fire. The pilot jumped from the rear entry door and landed on his back. Pilot refused medical attention and sustained burns and a cut to his left hand. The inspector further stated that the airplane was fueled at the local Fixed Base Operator (FBO) with 45.2 gallons of 100 Low Lead aviation fuel, which resulted in a total of 150 gallons onboard. Both the fuel source and the airplane were checked for contaminants by the pilot and FBO personnel. The inspector also interviewed the pilot, who stated that he taxied out and lined up for takeoff on the runway. With brakes on, he cycled the propellers and they "checked good." The magneto check at 1,500 rpm was also "good," as were the oil pressure and oil temperature. The pilot then ensured that the fuel selectors were on both mains, the throttles were full, mixtures were all the way forward, boost pumps were on low, and the propellers were all the way forward. He put flaps to the takeoff position and released the brakes. During the takeoff roll, everything was "normal" (temperatures and pressures were "in the green"), and when the airplane had accelerated to 75-80 knots, the pilot pulled back on the yoke slowly, and the airplane began to climb. The pilot raised the landing gear and noticed that the airplane wasn't climbing. He looked at the airspeed indicator, which indicated 80 knots. The pilot heard the stall warning and pulled back on the yoke. He then shut the boost pumps off and lowered the flaps before a hard impact. After impact, the pilot found himself upside down. He released his seat belt, saw fire and went to the back of the airplane. He opened the aft hatch and rolled forward, landing flat on his back. Two men then helped him up and led him to a nearby building. Winds, recorded about the time of the accident at an airport 8 nautical miles to the south, were from 130 degrees true, at 11, gusting to 17 knots.

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Hammond: 2 killed

Date & Time: Oct 14, 2015 at 1548 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N33FA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hammond - Atlanta
MSN:
421B-0502
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1370
Circumstances:
The twin-engine airplane, flown by a commercial pilot, was departing on a business flight from runway 31 when the right engine lost power. According to a pilot-rated witness, the airplane was about halfway down the 6,500 ft runway at an altitude of about 100 ft above ground level when he heard a "loud pop" and then saw the airplane's right propeller slow. The witness reported that the airplane yawed to the right and then began a right turn toward runway 18 with the right engine's propeller windmilling. The witness further reported that the airplane cleared a tree line by about 150 ft, rolled right, descended straight down to ground impact, and burst into flames. Postaccident examination of the airplane's right engine revealed that the crankshaft was fractured adjacent to the No. 2 main bearing, which had rotated. The crankcase halves adjacent to the No. 2 main bearing were fretted where the case through-studs were located. The fretting of the mating surfaces was consistent with insufficient clamping force due to insufficient torque of the through-stud nuts. Records indicated that all six cylinders on the right engine had been replaced at the airplane's most recent annual inspection 8 months before the accident. In order to replace the cylinders, the through-stud nuts had to be removed as they also served to hold down the cylinders. It is likely that when the cylinders were replaced, the through-stud nuts were not properly torqued, which, over time, allowed the case halves to move and led to the bearing spinning and the crankshaft fracturing. During the accident sequence, the pilot made a right turn in an attempt to return to the airport and did not feather the failed (right) engine's propeller, allowing it to windmill, thereby creating excessive drag. It is likely that the pilot allowed the airspeed to decay below the minimum required for the airplane to remain controllable, which combined with his failure to feather the failed engine's propeller and the turn in the direction of the failed engine resulted in a loss of airplane control.
Probable cause:
The loss of right engine power on takeoff due to maintenance personnel's failure to properly tighten the crankcase through-studs during cylinder replacement, which resulted in crankshaft fracture. Also causal were the pilot's failure to feather the propeller on the right engine and his failure to maintain control of the twin-engine airplane while maneuvering to return to the airport.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Ozren: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 24, 2015 at 1325 LT
Operator:
Registration:
YU-BSW
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Banja Luka – Tuzla
MSN:
421B-0248
YOM:
1972
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft, operated by STS Avijacija (STS Aviation), was flying from Banja Luka to Tuzla with three people on board, taking part to a foxes vaccination program. Enroute, the aircraft hit the slope of a wooded mountain located near the Monastery of Ozren, southeast part of the Serbian Republic of Bosnia. One occupant was killed while two others were seriously injured.

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Clovis

Date & Time: Aug 9, 2015 at 0925 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N726JB
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Melrose – Clovis
MSN:
421B-0020
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3700
Captain / Total hours on type:
300.00
Circumstances:
The private pilot reported that he was approaching the airport for landing in the multi-engine airplane when both engines began to surge. The pilot attempted to switch to the auxiliary fuel tanks, but inadvertently switched the left engine fuel selector to the off position. The left engine subsequently experienced a total loss of engine power. On final approach for landing, the airplane impacted terrain and was subsequently consumed by a postimpact fire; the fuel onboard the airplane at the time of the accident could not be determined. An examination of the airplane's engines and systems revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper management of fuel to the left engine during approach for landing, which resulted in a total loss of left engine power due to fuel starvation, and his subsequent failure to maintain control during the final landing approach, which resulted in collision with terrain.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II on Vargas Island: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 14, 2013 at 1425 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-GFMX
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Abbotsford - Tofino
MSN:
421B-0939
YOM:
1975
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Aircraft flight hours:
8500
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was performing a flight from Abbotsford to Tofino with two people on board (a father aged 51 and his son aged 25). On approach to Tofino Airport, on Vancouver Island, aircraft hit the ground on Vargas Island, off Tofino. SAR found the debris a day later and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Morelia

Date & Time: Apr 6, 2013 at 1200 LT
Operator:
Registration:
XB-LBY
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cuernavaca - Guadalajara
MSN:
421B-0336
YOM:
1973
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
En route, while cruising, pilot informed ATC about technical problems on right engine and elected to divert to Morelia Airport. On approach, he realized he could not reach the airport so he elected to make an emergency landing in an open field. While all six occupants were slightly injured, aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Fort Worth

Date & Time: Sep 5, 2012 at 0949 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N69924
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Worth - San Antonio
MSN:
421B-0553
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3800
Captain / Total hours on type:
897.00
Aircraft flight hours:
10056
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot was distracted by the nose cargo door popping open during takeoff; the airplane stalled and collided with trees off the end of the runway. The pilot said there were no mechanical problems with the airplane or engines and that he was fixated on the cargo door and lost control of the airplane. He also said that due to stress, he was not mentally prepared to handle the emergency situation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control on takeoff, which resulted in an inadvertent stall. Contributing to the accident were the unlatched nose cargo door, the pilot’s diverted attention, and the pilot's mental ability to handle the emergency situation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Savannah: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 11, 1982 at 0025 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N8001Q
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Charleston - Savannah
MSN:
421B-0001
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
3300
Circumstances:
The pilot reported he was on a missed approach and was returning to Charleston "heading 360°..." the aircraft crashed about 1/4 mi south and 100 feet short of the departure end of runway 27. The wreckage scatter pattern was oriented on a heading of 155°. Missed approach procedures specify a climbing right turn via a 325° heading. The left engine prop drive gear shaft had evidence of both bending and torsional failure loads. There was no evidence of machining or rotational smearing. Two of the three propeller blade tips were bent aft about the blade face. The left turbocharger had a tension failure of the turbine wheel shaft. No smear marks were noted on the fracture face. Single turbine blade impact marks were noted on the housing. The n°1 tach needle indicated 900 rpm and the n°2 tach needle indicated 1,900 rpm. All four occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: loss of engine power
Phase of operation: missed approach (IFR)
Findings
1. (c) reason for occurrence undetermined
----------
Occurrence #2: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: missed approach (IFR)
Findings
2. (f) light condition - dark night
3. (f) weather condition - low ceiling
4. (f) weather condition - fog
5. (f) weather condition - below approach/landing minimums
6. (f) missed approach - performed - pilot in command
7. (c) aircraft handling - not possible - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #3: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: missed approach (IFR)
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II near Afton: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 24, 1982 at 2350 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N8019Q
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Alton - Yukon
MSN:
421B-0019
YOM:
1970
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3750
Aircraft flight hours:
2200
Circumstances:
At about 1930 cdt, the aircraft departed Yukon, OK on a direct flight to Alton, IL. It landed at Alton at about 2200 cdt, and about 10 minutes later, it departed on a return flight to Yukon. Before departing Alton, the pilot stated that he would refuel at Springfield, MO while on the return trip. However, there was no indication that the plane was refueled at Springfield. Subsequently, the aircraft crashed near Afton, OK at about 2350 cdt. A witness stated that he had seen the aircraft circling back and forth across the highway at low altitude, then it went into a left bank and nose dived into the ground. An investigation revealed the aircraft impacted in a near level attitude, but in a steep angle of descent. The fuel tanks were found to be empty. There was no evidence of fuel spillage on the ground, except near the right tip tank. The left and right fuel selectors were found positioned to the right main tank. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: loss of engine power(total) - nonmechanical
Phase of operation: approach
Findings
1. (f) light condition - dark night
2. (c) in-flight planning/decision - improper - pilot in command
3. (c) fluid,fuel - starvation
4. (c) precautionary landing - delayed - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: approach
Findings
5. (c) airspeed(vmc) - not maintained - pilot in command
6. (c) stall - inadvertent - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #3: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Final Report: