Crash of a Cessna 401B near Lane: 2 killed

Date & Time: Oct 4, 2017 at 1745 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 401 (30286)">
Registration:
N401HH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
401B-0004
YOM:
1969
Location: Lane (21974)"> South Carolina (16094)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The pilot was apparently in a way to land on a private airstrip. While cruising at low height, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed inverted in an open field located near Lane. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 401A in Fulton

Date & Time: Nov 17, 2014 at 1728 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 401 (30286)">
Operator: Heartland Air (39605)">
Registration:
N401ME
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fulton – Little Rock
MSN:
401A-0085
YOM:
1969
Location: Fulton (20014)"> Missouri (15290)">
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Just after take off, while in initial climb, the twin engine aircraft stalled and came to rest in a field. Both pilots were seriously injured while the passenger sustained moderate injuries. The aircraft was damaged beyond repair. According to the pilot, the engines suffered a loss of power just after rotation.

Crash of a Cessna 401 near Chanute: 4 killed

Date & Time: May 11, 2012 at 1630 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 401 (30286)">
Operator: Private American (31833)">
Registration:
N9DM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Tulsa - Council Bluffs
MSN:
401-0123
YOM:
1991
Location: Chanute (18497)"> Kansas (14872)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
613
Captain / Total hours on type:
13.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2455
Circumstances:
While en route to the destination airport, the pilot turned on the cabin heater and, afterward, an unusual smell was detected by the occupants and the ambient air temperature increased. When the pilot turned the heater off, dark smoke entered the cabin and obscured the occupants' vision. The smoke likely interfered with the pilot’s ability to identify a safe landing site. During the subsequent emergency landing attempt to a field, the airplane’s wing contacted the ground and the airplane cartwheeled. Examination of the airplane found several leaks around weld points on the combustion chamber of the heater unit. A review of logbook entries revealed that the heater was documented as inoperative during the most recent annual inspection. Although a work order indicated that maintenance work was completed at a later date, there was no logbook entry that returned the heater to service. There were no entries in the maintenance logbooks that documented any testing of the heater or tracking of the heater's hours of operation. A flight instructor who flew with the pilot previously stated that the pilot used the heater on the accident airplane at least once before the accident flight. The heater’s overheat warning light activated during that flight, and the heater shut down without incident. The flight instructor showed the pilot how to reset the overheat circuit breaker but did not follow up on its status during their instruction. There is no evidence that a mechanic examined the airplane before the accident flight. Regarding the overheat warning light, the airplane flight manual states that the heater “should be thoroughly checked to determine the reason for the malfunction” before the overheat switch is reset. The pilot’s use of the heater on the accident flight suggests that he did not understand its status and risk of its continued use without verifying that it had been thoroughly checked as outlined in the airplane flight manual. A review of applicable airworthiness directives found that, in comparison with similar combustion heater units, there is no calendar time limit that would require periodic inspection of the accident unit. In addition, there is no guidance or instruction to disable the heater such that it could no longer be activated in the airplane if the heater was not airworthy.
Causes:
The malfunction of the cabin heater, which resulted in an inflight fire and smoke in the airplane. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s lack of understanding concerning the status of the airplane's heater system following and earlier overheat event and risk of its continued use. Also contributing were the inadequate inspection criteria for the cabin heater.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 401A in Gladewater

Date & Time: Nov 12, 2011 at 1635 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 401 (30286)">
Operator: Private American (31833)">
Registration:
N531MH
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Natchitoches - Gladewater
MSN:
401-0097
YOM:
1969
Location: Gladewater (20157)"> Texas (16262)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1241
Captain / Total hours on type:
468.00
Circumstances:
While preparing to enter the traffic pattern, the pilot checked the wind on his weather-equipped global positioning system and also heard a wind update on the radio for the nearest weather facility. On the basis of the information obtained, the pilot understood that the current wind was from 170 degrees at 20 to 25 knots. He entered the traffic pattern in a left downwind for runway 14 and began to slow the airplane for landing. The pilot stated that when the airplane was on short final at an airspeed of about 120 knots, a gusting crosswind pushed it right of the runway centerline. The airplane began to descend rapidly, and the pilot added full power in an attempt to go around. However, the airplane rolled to the right, and the airplane crashed on the right side of the runway. No preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures were found that would have precluded normal operation.
Causes:
The pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane during the landing and attempted go-around in a gusty crosswind.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 401 in Nairobi: 2 killed

Date & Time: Oct 21, 2011 at 1523 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 401 (30286)">
Registration:
5Y-CAE
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Nairobi - Marsabit - Lodwar - Nairobi
MSN:
401-0011
YOM:
1967
Country: Kenya (13364)">
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Aircraft left Nairobi-Wilson Airport in the morning for a flight to Marsabit and Lodwar, carrying exam documents. While returning to Wilson Airport in the afternoon, aircraft went out of control and crashed in an open field for unknown reasons. The pilot and a passenger were killed as the second passenger was seriously injured. The aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of a Cessna 401 in Plymouth

Date & Time: Jun 19, 2010 at 1703 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 401 (30286)">
Registration:
N401TE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Plymouth - Plymouth
MSN:
401-0180
YOM:
1971
Location: Plymouth (24755)"> Massachusetts (15226)">
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3500
Captain / Total hours on type:
1200.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2004
Circumstances:
The airplane was returning from a 3-hour aerial mapping mission and was lined up for a straight-in, 5-mile final approach for landing. About 3 miles out on final approach, and prior to performing the before-landing check, both engines stopped producing power in sequence, one almost immediately after the other. The pilot said that by the time he completed his remedial actions the airplane had descended to about 200 feet above the ground and the engines would not restart. The auxiliary fuel tank gauges were bouncing between 2-5 gallons and the main tanks were bouncing around at 25 gallons per side. The pilot then selected a forced landing site between two large trees and landed the airplane in heavily wooded terrain. A detailed examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical anomalies. According to information contained in the aircraft manufacturer’s owner's manual, the auxiliary fuel tanks are designed for cruising flight and are not equipped with pumps; operation near the ground (below 1000 feet) using auxiliary fuel tanks is not recommended. The first step in the before-landing check was to select the main fuel tanks on both the left and right fuel selectors, respectively. The pilot indicated that he should have selected the main tanks sooner and performed the before-landing check earlier in the approach.
Causes:
A total loss of engine power during final approach due to fuel starvation as a result of the pilot’s delayed configuration of the airplane for landing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 401 in Salt Cay

Date & Time: Jul 24, 2009 at 1200 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 401 (30286)">
Operator: Private Turks and Caicos (37038)">
Registration:
VQ-TLG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While turning around Salt Cay Island, Bahamas, pilot made an emergency landing off shore. He was rescued while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. Exact circumstances unknown.

Crash of a Cessna 401 in Narsarsuaq

Date & Time: Jan 15, 2007 at 1200 LT
Type of aircraft: Cessna 401 (30286)">
Operator: Private American (31833)">
Registration:
N6274Q
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Goose Bay-Narsarsuaq
MSN:
401-0074
YOM:
1969
Location: Narsarsuaq (23714)"> Kommune Kujalleq (14960)">
Country: Greenland (13279)">
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:

For unknown reasons, the twin engine aircraft made a wheels up landing. Both pilots escaped uninjured but the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.